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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

P.E. Murray, S. Donohoe and S. Goodhew

This study draws on the experiences of a consortium of UK universities seeking to enhance the quality of undergraduate building education. Their initiative called…

Abstract

This study draws on the experiences of a consortium of UK universities seeking to enhance the quality of undergraduate building education. Their initiative called, student‐centred learning in construction education (SLICE) was funded by the UK government to improve student learning by inspiring and equipping lecturers to develop effective student‐centred learning activities. The benefits of student‐centred and flexible learning are explored and the projects' outputs are described in general. One of the outputs, the “Building Pathology Lecturers' Toolkit” is examined in depth. A review of its content reveals that to be a valuable and practical resource for lecturers, providing them with guidance and ready‐to‐use yet adaptable exemplar learning materials for students. The potential impact of this toolkit and the toolkit programme generally is scrutinised using feedback data from lecturers and students, concluding that the flexible format and content offers considerable opportunities to enhance learning in the building pathology field.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2018

Annafatmawaty B.T. Ismail, Sukanlaya Sawang and Roxanne Zolin

The purpose of this paper is to answer the research question: “Do different pedagogies used in teaching entrepreneurship education influence individual skill development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer the research question: “Do different pedagogies used in teaching entrepreneurship education influence individual skill development, which then in turn translates into a likelihood of entrepreneurial implementation intention?”

Design/methodology/approach

The number of total participants for the quasi-experiment was 308 undergraduate students in Malaysia, in which pre- and post-test (n=203) and control (n=105) groups are included. Students who enroled in the entrepreneurship course were randomly allocated into a class employing teacher-centred pedagogy or student-centred pedagogy. Learning outcomes are measured by objective and subjective measures.

Findings

Both pedagogical approaches had a positive effect on the development of the learning outcomes. However, the students who learned using the teacher-centred approach statistically developed a higher level of objective and subjective learning outcomes compared to the students who learned using the student-centred approach. The findings also suggest that the relationship between entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurial intention mediates by learned skills.

Originality/value

The quasi-experimental design greatly improves the ability to make accurate claims about the impact of entrepreneurial education on entrepreneurship-related outcomes. Further, the study uses the implementation intention strategy in measuring the entrepreneurial intention. Thus, the study strongly supports for the view that implementation intention improves predictive validity of the behavioural intention within the framework of theory of planned behaviour by setting out in advance when, where, and how the goal will be achieved.

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Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2020

Nimer Abusalim, Mohammad Rayyan, Marwan Jarrah and Moayad Sharab

This research paper aims to explore blended learning implementation in universities that are on a low budget, essentially determining the more important steps to invest…

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper aims to explore blended learning implementation in universities that are on a low budget, essentially determining the more important steps to invest during the initial stage of implementation and investing in costly IT infrastructure or training faculty for student-centred learning and relevant pedagogies.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 254 students at the University of Jordan (UJ) has been administered. Student satisfaction with blended learning is related to the two main variables of IT infrastructure and teacher training for blended learning strategies.

Findings

The results indicate that faculty training has a significantly higher impact on predictability of satisfaction than IT infrastructure. Therefore, low-budget institutions should focus first on helping instructors shift to student-centred styles of pedagogies before making large investments in IT infrastructure.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the fact that the chosen setting did not completely lack IT infrastructure, the results may need to be retested with at least two individual institutions, one where advanced IT infrastructure is available and one where it is completely lacking. More can also be done to vary the limited location of the study.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that making costly investments into technology is not a necessary first step during the initial stages of blended learning adoption in developing countries.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the need for more research on blended learning adoption in developing countries with scarce finances and lack of resources sufficient to achieve faculty training and IT infrastructure improvement together. Several universities make costly investments only to lack sufficient blended learning pedagogies which often results in failed blended learning implementation.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

T. van Oordt and Ingrid Mulder

Educators in the accounting discipline are faced with the challenge of finding innovative ways to accommodate the flexible learning styles of Millennial students, using…

Abstract

Purpose

Educators in the accounting discipline are faced with the challenge of finding innovative ways to accommodate the flexible learning styles of Millennial students, using “in classroom/contact time” effectively and decreasing transactional distance between students and educators in large classes. In an attempt to address these challenges, this paper aims to describe the implementation of basic e-learning tools (podcasts, vodcasts and voice-over-PowerPoint) as supplementary and substitutional tools in an undergraduate taxation curriculum. The tools were implemented as part of a student-centred approach to the facilitation of learning, embedded in the Blended Learning Theory. The paper reports on students’ use and experience of various basic e-learning tools, as well as the impact of the use of these tools on student performance.

Design/methodology/approach

An action research methodology was followed, and data were collected by way of a voluntary, descriptive student survey and student class lists. A total of 387 students completed the survey.

Findings

Students appear to have access to devices and data to use e-learning tools. They perceive these tools as helpful study aids and prefer synchronous, substitutional tools. Use of the tools does not have a significant impact on performance; however, it does appear to have a positive impact on the learning environment and student engagement.

Originality/value

The results of the study may be of benefit to educators and curriculum designers who are responsible for reviewing and updating the content delivery methods of undergraduate taxation curricula in large classes with diverse student populations. These results add to the limited body of knowledge on the implementation of basic e-learning tools in a South African accounting education setting.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Amanda J. Carter and Sharon Yam

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role and contribution of tutors to property education. Using the theory of tutor performance which outlines six behaviours…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role and contribution of tutors to property education. Using the theory of tutor performance which outlines six behaviours which may positively influence student outcomes, this paper considers how tutors can maximise student learning and engagement in tutorials.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a mixed methods approach including student evaluations of teaching (SETs), a survey of students and reflexive journals of a tutor in property education.

Findings

This research found that conscious adoption of the behaviours recommended under the theory of tutor performance and informed by further education in the form of a Graduate Certificate in Higher Education resulted in significant improvement of SET results. Student survey responses showed the influence of “real life” experience, amongst other things, in underpinning their learning.

Research limitations/implications

While this research has limitations, in terms of number of responses and restriction to a single tutor, the findings indicate that tutors may have a significant influence on the engagement of students in property education. The use of the tutor's own professional experience and the use of real life scenarios within the delivery of course content may serve to ensure graduates have a greater capacity to meet employers’ expectations.

Originality/value

This research brings originality to the subject of property education by exploring issues in property education from the most fundamental level, that of the tutor. This level of analysis is enhanced by the newness of the tutor in question to academia which highlights property education with new eyes, unencumbered with years of routine teaching experience. The incorporation of reflexive methods with a survey and SETs provides rich experience‐filled data that considers the process of property education and the ways in which purposeful skills enrichment of the tutor and the student may achieve greater outcomes for the property profession and industry.

Details

Property Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 21 July 2020

Susanne Mary Owen, Toabwa Toaiauea, Tekonnang Timee, Tebetaio Harding and Taaruru Taoaba

Systems educational reform in developing countries through effective principal capacity- building programs is essential for improving student learning, with the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Systems educational reform in developing countries through effective principal capacity- building programs is essential for improving student learning, with the purpose of this paper being to use case studies to identify key success factors in the implementation of an instructional leadership program in the developing country of Kiribati.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach involving mixed methods including semi-structured interviews and document analysis was used within three purposively sampled schools to examine implementation success factors relevant to instructional leadership literature

Findings

The case studies reveal the overall value of the Kiribati instructional leadership program involving school leader workshops and ongoing coaching support, with instructional leadership reflecting directive and collaborative, as well as transformative theoretical aspects. Key implementation success factors within researched schools were leaders undertaking regular observations in classrooms, systematic tracking of student achievement and nurturing a positive culture for learning, as well as establishment of various collaborative processes involving community and teacher peer learning groups.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides in-depth information through teacher and school leader interviews and examining relevant school documentation artefacts. A limitation is that the study involved only three schools and was undertaken less than a year into program implementation. Future research involving more schools and several years after implementation would be beneficial to investigate sustainability across the school system and longer-term program impacts.

Practical implications

The data provides practical tips for school leaders regarding effective teacher capacity-building approaches, as well as providing information for policy makers, especially in developing countries, about effective professional development programs for school leaders and teachers. 10; 10;

Originality/value

The study examines a system-wide workshop series and coaching approach to school leader and teacher capacity-building in a developing country from a theoretical and practical perspective relevant to instructional leadership and also transformational leadership, which is an under-researched area. 10; 10; 10;

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2014

Roger Hadgraft and Jo Dane

A key challenge for higher education institutions around the world is to provide active and engaging learning encounters for a new generation of students to develop their…

Abstract

A key challenge for higher education institutions around the world is to provide active and engaging learning encounters for a new generation of students to develop their skills for work in a rapidly changing environment. Typically, these students are accustomed to being digitally connected 24/7 and they have real-time access to truly global learning resources. The challenge facing higher education providers is how to create active and engaging learning encounters within an aging stock of infrastructure by a generation of traditional academics, both of which generally foster teacher-led instruction.

In considering this conundrum, this chapter is viewed through two lenses: (1) a teacher practising problem-based learning (PBL) for more than 20 years and (2) an educational planner who designs learning spaces. Together the paper explores the challenges of pedagogy and design, some disruptors that are making change imperative and, specifically, the opportunities available in both pedagogy and design to create new learning activities and spaces. The paper argues that curricula need to be dominated by collaborative investigation and problem solving in spaces that encourage and afford such activity.

Details

The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-986-7

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Elisa Monteiro and Chris Forlin

A critical resource for inclusive education is ensuring that an effective curriculum is in place for preparing teachers. Reviewing an existing curriculum and revising it…

Abstract

A critical resource for inclusive education is ensuring that an effective curriculum is in place for preparing teachers. Reviewing an existing curriculum and revising it to meet this need is an important aspect of every teacher training institution. The purpose of this chapter is to investigate the effect of a revised Post-Graduate Diploma in Education programme on teachers' pedagogical practice and knowledge transfer for inclusive education. Following completion of the programme, this was investigated from the perspective of teachers' implementation of knowledge transfer to their teaching through various pedagogical strategies, classroom management and perceived personal awareness of student needs. In addition, teachers responded regarding the programme design. While strong support was found for the programme, significant differences were found, however, between teachers working in Chinese and English medium of instruction schools, age and teaching experience following participation in the programme. Implications are discussed within the context of responding to the new curriculum framework for formal education in Macao Special Administration Region, which promotes more inclusive schools.

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2007

Caitriona Bermingham and Abdulhussain E. Mahdi

It is recognised that students in higher education need to acquire and develop effective study and transferable skills in order to be successful in their study and beyond…

Abstract

Purpose

It is recognised that students in higher education need to acquire and develop effective study and transferable skills in order to be successful in their study and beyond. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new custom‐built learning content management system (LCMS), which renders intelligent tutoring modules for the provision of study skills training, with emphasis on the educational pedagogies used by the system to deliver the training.

Design/methodology/approach

The system comprises two principal units; an administrator unit and a student‐user unit. The administrator unit is designed to enable authorised users with no prior knowledge of web application design and development to create and modify highly dynamic and engaging multimedia training modules. The student unit delivers highly interactive and user‐customised modules to help students develop their skills, using a pedagogical approach based on active, student‐centred and peer‐assisted learning.

Findings

The performance of the proposed system was subjected to a comprehensive test and evaluation process. General feedback from the users recruited to complete the subjective testing was very positive. It was generally acknowledged that the system was intuitive, the content well structured and delivered and the look and feel of the application aesthetically pleasing.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the use of and benefit of using technology to enhance student learning of study and other transferable skills. It also identifies the need to integrate proven educational pedagogies so as to enhance overall learning and demonstrates how to incorporate these approaches in an LCMS.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Abstract

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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