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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2021

Kjersti Kjos Longva

The purpose of the paper is to provide insight into how students navigate entrepreneurial ecosystems and make use of social networks as they create their own ventures…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to provide insight into how students navigate entrepreneurial ecosystems and make use of social networks as they create their own ventures. Such ecosystems for students are an understudied phenomenon and there is a need for more profound insights into the issue in order to build better support systems for student entrepreneurs. The study aims to increase understanding on the elements that are important in students' entrepreneurial ecosystems and how these impact on students' venture creation processes, with emphasize on the role social networks play. Student entrepreneurs account for a substantial number of the startups that come into being at universities. Understanding more about how the surroundings affects this process is important for facilitating student entrepreneurship in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is qualitative and makes use of in-depth interviews with student entrepreneurs, educators and support actors in the ecosystems. Multiple actors were interviewed in order to capture different perspectives on the matter, with a total of 15 interviews conducted.

Findings

Two main findings arose from the study. First, it provides insight into elements that are perceived as important for student venture creation by the student entrepreneurs themselves, by educators and by support actors in the ecosystems. Second, it describes how the elements make up the entrepreneurial ecosystems surrounding the students, which serve as platforms from which students can develop their social networks. Therefore, the study highlights how such ecosystems can serve as sources from which students can gain access to ideas, resources and identity processes.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study is that the interviews took place in one country. Consequently, further investigation is necessary to establish whether the findings are valid in other contexts. The research has implications for higher educational institutions, policymakers and researchers concerned with student entrepreneurship and student venture creation.

Originality/value

The study contributes empirical findings on a topic that is currently not well understood and on which there are few empirical studies. While student ventures represent a substantial proportion of university spin-offs, the topic has received little attention compared to research on academic entrepreneurship. The study represents a step towards enhancing understanding of students' entrepreneurial ecosystems and how students gain access to resources through social network ties within these systems.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2017

Alka Gupta and Vishal Gupta

Despite the increasing popularity of entrepreneurship among students in colleges and university, there is a surprising scarcity of theoretical or empirical research on…

Abstract

Despite the increasing popularity of entrepreneurship among students in colleges and university, there is a surprising scarcity of theoretical or empirical research on this topic. In this article, we define the concept of student entrepreneurship, delineate its domain, and demarcate its boundaries. We propose a preliminary typology of student entrepreneurship rooted in the works of three leading economists from the Austrian School of Economics: Joseph Schumpeter, Israel Kirzner, and Ludwig Lachmann. We also identify and discuss important challenges associated with the practice of student entrepreneurship. The article concludes by advancing a future research agenda for the study of student entrepreneurship.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Suna Løwe Nielsen and William B. Gartner

The purpose of this paper is to study different aspects and tensional forces that play a role in the internal and contextual negotiation that takes place within students

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study different aspects and tensional forces that play a role in the internal and contextual negotiation that takes place within students in the exploration of the possible identity of entrepreneur. It expands the knowledge of how the university context influences student entrepreneurial processes from a multiple identity perspective. The findings are related to discussions of entrepreneurship education.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual paper that presents a framework on student entrepreneurial identity sense making that is grounded in a multiple identity perspective. The framework is illustrated by ten narrative cases on student entrepreneurship.

Findings

The framework suggests four different ways students make sense of identity in the process of exploring the entrepreneurial identity along with their university studies. In this process students negotiate between the two identities of “student” and “entrepreneur”, both demanding in time, effort and commitment, and they in different manners struggle with balancing university belonging and entrepreneurial distinctiveness.

Originality/value

The framework serves as a point of departure for discussing the psychological processes and tensions associated with students’ entrepreneurial identity construction, and what it means to entrepreneurship education. It is suggested that universities to a higher degree have to view themselves as psychological institutional moratoriums and thus as platforms of identity explorations rather than deterministic systems preparing students for certain careers to support students in becoming entrepreneurs.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 59 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 6 December 2019

Dennis Barber III, Suhail Mohammad Ghouse, John Batchelor, Francesca Chaher, Michael L. Harris and Shanan G. Gibson

The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of business students in India toward business managers (not self-employed) and entrepreneurs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of business students in India toward business managers (not self-employed) and entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

Students’ perceptions of the ethical behaviors of business managers and entrepreneurs were measured using the Bucar and Hisrich (2001) model. The scale comprises 20 behavioral descriptors, and the students were asked to indicate the degree to which they believed entrepreneurs and business managers would consider these actions as ethical.

Findings

Responses to general items of ethical behavior demonstrated a difference in the perception of Indian students between business managers and entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the field of entrepreneurship in two ways. One involves the results of the hypothesis testing presented herein to evaluate the perceptions of business students in India toward entrepreneurs and business managers. The second contribution is comparing these results to that of a similar study using a US sample (Batchelor et al., 2011) to compare the differences in perceptions toward entrepreneurs and business managers across these two nations.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Catherine Elliott, Janet Mantler and Joie Huggins

Women are underrepresented in most university entrepreneurship education (EE) programmes and less likely than men to pursue business venturing as a career. One reason may…

Abstract

Purpose

Women are underrepresented in most university entrepreneurship education (EE) programmes and less likely than men to pursue business venturing as a career. One reason may be the “entrepreneurial identity gap”, whereby female students do not see themselves as successful entrepreneurs. This paper aims to explore the nature of this identity gap and its relationship to entrepreneurial intent and entrepreneurship education.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of contemporary, gender-inclusive entrepreneurial attributes was developed using entrepreneurial subject matter experts and tested with 591 university students to explore the nature of the gendered entrepreneurial identity gap.

Findings

While masculine stereotypes persist and the entrepreneurial identity gap is larger for female students, results suggest that a more gender-inclusive vocabulary of entrepreneurship is emerging among the student population and an androgynous perception of the idealized entrepreneur. Entrepreneurship education had a positive influence on entrepreneurial intent.

Research limitations/implications

Study findings advance the conversation about entrepreneurial identity, the nature of the gendered identity gap and the role of education in closing that gap. The questionnaire and set of gender-inclusive attributes should continue to be tested beyond student samples.

Practical implications

Based on this study, entrepreneurship education could benefit from more gender-inclusive instructional practices and vocabulary and a broadened definition of what it means to be entrepreneurial. More students – both men and women – will see themselves as entrepreneurs and be inspired to participate in the innovation economy.

Originality/value

This study takes a novel approach to the study of entrepreneurial identity, developing a new set of attributes and contemporary vocabulary around business venturing.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Laetitia Gabay-Mariani and Jean-Pierre Boissin

In line with an emerging body of literature questioning student entrepreneurs’ practices, and recent calls to bridge the intention-action gap, this contribution aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

In line with an emerging body of literature questioning student entrepreneurs’ practices, and recent calls to bridge the intention-action gap, this contribution aims to identify profiles of commitment among nascent entrepreneurs, and their relationship with the performance of entrepreneurial behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Relying on Meyer and Allen's multidimensional model, the authors build an empirical taxonomy regarding affective and instrumental forms of commitment experienced by nascent entrepreneurs (n = 328) operating within French higher education.

Findings

The authors identify three commitment profiles – weak, affective and total – associated with distinct levels of advancement and investment in the entrepreneurial process. This analysis leads them to map out the entrepreneurial process followed by nascent entrepreneurs with three main thresholds: the initial threshold, the resonance threshold and the irreversibility threshold.

Research limitations/implications

The work contributes to an emerging field of research dedicated to student entrepreneurship. It highlights the existence of different trajectories among nascent entrepreneurs, but also to different ways of being tied to them. It also enriches more broadly the understanding of the entrepreneurial process, especially its volitional phase.

Practical implications

The results are also important to guide public action, especially to design relevant support programs accounting for nascent entrepreneurs' diversity.

Originality/value

This is the first research to identify profiles of nascent student entrepreneurs based on the way they feel tied to their project, but also to the broader project of becoming entrepreneurs.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

James W. Peltier and Carol Scovotti

This paper aims to report the findings of a large‐scale multinational study of students in a marketing organization that investigates the need to expand entrepreneurship…

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3385

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report the findings of a large‐scale multinational study of students in a marketing organization that investigates the need to expand entrepreneurship education in the marketing curriculum. Key questions include what is the entrepreneurial mindset of students interested in marketing, what do they think they need to know, should they some day decide to pursue entrepreneurial opportunities, and how satisfied are they with their current exposure to entrepreneurial marketing experiences?

Design/methodology/approach

Via e‐mail, a major international collegiate marketing association headquartered in the USA sent the online questionnaire to a random sample of 4,300 students. Content areas included entrepreneurial mindset, desired entrepreneurial marketing learning and experiential activities, and demographics. A total of 605 students participated in the study.

Findings

The findings show that there is a large segment of marketing students who desire to be an entrepreneur and feel strongly about entrepreneurial education. Exposure to entrepreneurial marketing tools, experiential learning activities, and networking opportunities were deemed to be especially important.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on students in marketing organizations. Additional research is needed at the course level.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that entrepreneurial marketing education is needed in the business curriculum. Training in entrepreneurial marketing will better prepare students interested in being an entrepreneur or small business owner.

Originality/value

Entrepreneurial marketing has received little attention in the business education literature. The study is the first of its kind to study entrepreneurial marketing curriculum needs from the perspective of students in a nearly 11,000 strong international marketing organization.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Jeannette Oppedisano and Kenneth Laird

This article presents a pedagogical model that utilizes students as primary researchers in the identification, interviewing, and then reporting on women entrepreneurs as a…

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1082

Abstract

This article presents a pedagogical model that utilizes students as primary researchers in the identification, interviewing, and then reporting on women entrepreneurs as a major component of a multidisciplinary entrepreneurship course. The purpose of the course is to attract students who may not be familiar with the entrepreneurship concept itself, the role of women in such economic ventures, or the possibilities for people like themselves in such a career avenue. Students are exposed to the accomplishments of women entrepreneurs throughout U.S. history in the broad categories of agriculture and mining; construction; communication; manufacturing; service (both for profit and not-for-profit); transportation; and wholesale and retail trade. This content experience is then enhanced by the studentsʼ own direct interaction with and interviewing of women entrepreneurs. The implementation, potential outcomes, and possible adaptations of the course are described, and this transformational learning process model is illustrated.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Giustina Secundo, Pasquale Del Vecchio, Giovanni Schiuma and Giuseppina Passiante

The purpose of this paper is to explore how collaborative entrepreneurial learning (EL) processes between entrepreneurs and university students can enhance the…

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2211

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how collaborative entrepreneurial learning (EL) processes between entrepreneurs and university students can enhance the entrepreneurial practices in the context of knowledge-intensive enterprises. These learning processes represent a valuable source for entrepreneurship development in incumbent enterprises in the forms of innovative products, services, processes or organizational renewal.

Design/methodology/approach

An extreme case study is the project “Mimprendo” (www.mimprendo.it), an initiative promoted by the Italian Conference of the University Colleges and the Italian Association of Young Entrepreneurs in collaboration with Italian universities. This is analyzed in the period 2009-2015, during which seven editions were developed.

Findings

A framework is presented based on collaborative EL processes to perform relevant entrepreneurial projects in knowledge-intensive enterprises. The framework provides a coherent and systematic approach to generate, select and implement entrepreneurial practices in incumbent companies starting from a project competition involving creative students and innovative entrepreneurs. EL processes in the community composed of entrepreneurs, experts and university students are grouped into the entrepreneurial phases of inspiration, exploration, exploitation, acceleration and growth, and include the learning processes of “intuition and sensing,” “contamination,” “experiential and contextual learning,” “experimenting and acting” and finally “thinking and reflecting.”

Research limitations/implications

Implications for research can be identified according to many perspectives to deepen the centrality of the learning process in the research on knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship.

Practical implications

The framework results to be a promising approach to diffuse an entrepreneurial culture both in incumbent enterprises and in university students through a synergic collaboration among industry, university and institution. Practical implications could be derived for enterprise, students and educators involved in the design of innovative learning initiatives to sustain the development of an entrepreneurial mind-set.

Originality/value

The framework contributes to extending an emerging research area exploring entrepreneurship as a never-ending dynamic learning process. The involvement of brilliant university students in activating EL process with entrepreneurs in incumbent enterprises represents a novel aspect in the field of entrepreneurship and innovation.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Thomas Hopkins and Howard Feldman

As entrepreneurship courses become more popular, an increasingnumber of institutions are turning to practising entrepreneurs as asource of classroom instructors. Bringing…

Abstract

As entrepreneurship courses become more popular, an increasing number of institutions are turning to practising entrepreneurs as a source of classroom instructors. Bringing such people into the classroom, however, generates an entirely new set of questions for a college and its faculty. Four issues that schools should consider in attempting to recruit qualified entrepreneurs are identified: motives, entrepreneurial experiences, academic knowledge and teaching skills. To attract and retain these individuals, schools should offer adequate rewards, support and commitment, and should assign the entrepreneur a faculty “host”.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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