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Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Steve Walker and Mette Bunting

In this chapter, we will look at how the indirect approach can enable us to find a way to learn about young people's lives. The setting for this chapter is informal youth…

Abstract

In this chapter, we will look at how the indirect approach can enable us to find a way to learn about young people's lives. The setting for this chapter is informal youth work, reminding us of the value of a wide range of practices with young people, and the findings are equally relevant to formal and informal education as guiding principles for good practice. We will look at the skillful interactions practitioners establish with young people and how they can be developed and promoted. Reflective practice for practitioners is identified as beneficial in adding the value of young people's voice, whilst building relationships. The nature of young people's participation and power is argued to benefit from a co-constructed and socio-cultural understanding; majoring on the importance of context, indirect method and equality literacy framework. We will suggest how the indirect approach can improve young people's lives in schools and/or youth provision.

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Combatting Marginalisation by Co-creating Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-451-6

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Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Peter Hornbæk Frostholm and Steve Walker

From a both theoretical and practical outset, this chapter discusses how the research methodology behind MaCE, The Indirect Approach is realised and applied. This chapter…

Abstract

From a both theoretical and practical outset, this chapter discusses how the research methodology behind MaCE, The Indirect Approach is realised and applied. This chapter also touches upon some of the ethical implications of applying the approach in research. The aim of this chapter is to add some empirical experiences to the initial framework of the approach, by exploring the practical craftsmanship behind the idea of getting answers to questions that you in fact do not ask.

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Combatting Marginalisation by Co-creating Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-451-6

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2005

Joy Godesiabois

Most of us have experienced the “small world” phenomenon; you meet a stranger while traveling or waiting in a queue, for example, and begin to discuss where you are from…

Abstract

Most of us have experienced the “small world” phenomenon; you meet a stranger while traveling or waiting in a queue, for example, and begin to discuss where you are from, what type of work you do, or why you are at this certain location. Surprisingly, you and the stranger discover you both know the same person, possibly from your hometown, academic department, or children's school. You both remark “what a small world” and then go on your way. Small worlds are just one example of social networks, or how individuals know one another. Social scientists have been interested in this phenomenon since the 1930s and have developed network analysis tools to gain an understanding of how social networks are formed and evolve. These methods have improved significantly over the past 15 years and may provide an informative lens through which to investigate international entrepreneurship (IE).

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International Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-227-6

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Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Suleika Bort, Marie Oehme and Florian Zock

To maintain and enhance innovation performance, many firms nowadays look for resources from external sources such as strategic alliances and regional network embeddedness…

Abstract

To maintain and enhance innovation performance, many firms nowadays look for resources from external sources such as strategic alliances and regional network embeddedness. While considering the important interdependencies among different alliances, research has established an alliance portfolio perspective. From an alliance portfolio perspective, firms can consciously configure the dimensions of their alliance portfolios such as partner characteristics, relational properties, or structural properties. However, within the context of alliance portfolio configuration, the role of regional networks has been largely overlooked. As most high-tech firms are regionally clustered, this is an important research gap. In addressing this gap, this study explores the link between regional network density, alliance portfolio configuration, and its contribution to firm innovation performance. We examine how regional network density and alliance partner diversity influences firm level innovation output. We also investigate the moderating effect of overall network partner status and partner diversity on the link between regional network density and innovation performance. Our empirical evidence is derived from a longitudinal quantitative study of 1,233 German biotechnology firms. We find that regional network density and alliance partner diversity has an inverted U-shape effect on firm level innovation performance. However, overall network status as well as alliance partner diversity negatively moderates the link between regional network density and innovation output. Thus, our study contributes to a better understanding of the link between regional networks, alliance portfolio configuration, and firm level innovation performance.

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Understanding the Relationship Between Networks and Technology, Creativity and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-489-3

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2003

Gordon Walker

This commentary addresses the problem of interfirm network formation from the perspective of multiple types of relationship content and of network structure. The approach…

Abstract

This commentary addresses the problem of interfirm network formation from the perspective of multiple types of relationship content and of network structure. The approach builds on Burt’s (1980) typology of network structures and on a range of empirical studies on interorganizational networks. The chapter by Moldoveneau, Baum and Rowley on network evolution from an information-sharing perspective captures part of this research domain. The challenges posed by network evolution research are discussed in the broader light of multilevel analysis.

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Multi-Level Issues in Organizational Behavior and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-039-5

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Ademola O. Kaka, Mehmet Toycan, Vali Bashiry and Stuart D. Walker

The purpose of this paper is to describe a modified Hilbert‐based fractal antenna for ultra wideband (UWB) wireless applications. Simulation results show excellent…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a modified Hilbert‐based fractal antenna for ultra wideband (UWB) wireless applications. Simulation results show excellent multi‐band characteristics for UWB wireless applications.

Design/methodology/approach

A Hilbert curve‐based fractal is optimised for self‐replicating, space‐filling and self‐avoiding properties. In the proposed design, the Hilbert curve is applied to a rectangle as an initial iteration and maintained for the later iterations. Additionally, a Yagi‐like strip is removed from the second iteration of the Hilbert patch and a hexagonal portion is removed from the substrate to achieve good optimization. The antenna feed is created through a micro‐strip line with a feeding section. Finally, a partial ground plane technique is used for improved impedance matching characteristics. A finite element method (FEM) is used to simulate the modified Hilbert model with commercially available Ansoft HFSS software.

Findings

The proposed antenna is miniaturized (39 mm length×30 mm width) and has multi‐band characteristics. The simulation results show that the antenna has a reflection coefficient characteristic of <−10 dB, a linear phase reflection coefficient, better than 65 percent radiation efficiency, 2.2‐4 dBi antenna gain and nearly omni‐directional radiation pattern properties over the UWB bandwidth (3.1‐10.6 GHz).

Originality/value

The antenna shows promising characteristics for the full 7.5 GHz UWB bandwidth. In addition, the performance is achieved by using laceration techniques on the Hilbert patch and substrate, respectively. A partial ground plane ensures impedance matching of 50 over full UWB bandwidth. The simulation analysis of the modified Hilbert fractal antenna design constitutes the main contribution of the paper.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Mark Van Hoorebeek, Chris Gale and Stuart Walker

As the predicted escalation in the litigation becomes a reality for universities in the UK, increasing importance is placed on the consideration given to the integrity of…

Abstract

Purpose

As the predicted escalation in the litigation becomes a reality for universities in the UK, increasing importance is placed on the consideration given to the integrity of institutional protocols regulating decision making at all stages of student progression. The purpose of this paper is to outline the structures that are in place to provide an analysis of the issues that arise when these protocols are activated.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first, provides a brief yet accessible overview of the literature concerning the institutions involved in student appeal, second, explains the principles that should be applied when using and analysing university protocols, third, analyses the role that mediation can play within the sector, and finally, discusses the disability dimension within a complaints context.

Findings

It can be seen that disputes between student and institution are on the rise for a number of reasons, be it finance, complexity of legislation or otherwise. The robust nature of what the office of the independent adjudicator (OIA) does seems evident from the lack of successful challenge by way of judicial review, even though the process has been held to be reviewable in a limited way at least. Perhaps this will give some reassurance to the aggrieved student that their version of events will be heard and judged fairly, but the overwhelming message to institutions must be to address potential issues early by means of well drafted protocols, management of student expectation and possibly the establishment of some sort of campus ombudsman which may help deter, deflect or even solve disputes. The role of the OIA seems here to stay and the amount of business it does is likely to increase.

Originality/value

Increasing importance is placed on the consideration given to the integrity of institutional protocols regulating decision making at all stages of student progression. A wide variety of elements can impact on the quality of service expected compared with that provided to a student cohort, and this results in a diversity of potential complaints which have to be covered by university protocols. The value of this paper lies in the applicability of the themes that are discussed.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Ademola O. Kaka, Mehmet Toycan and Stuart D. Walker

A vertically stacked, three layer hybrid Hilbert fractal geometry and serpentine radiator-based patch antenna is proposed and characterized for medical implant…

Abstract

Purpose

A vertically stacked, three layer hybrid Hilbert fractal geometry and serpentine radiator-based patch antenna is proposed and characterized for medical implant applications at the Industrial, Scientific and Medical band (2.4-2.48 GHz). Antenna parameters are optimised to achieve miniaturized, biocompatible and stable transmission characteristics. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Human tissue effects on the antenna electrical characteristics were simulated with a three-layer (skin, fat and muscle) human tissue model with the dimensions of 180×70×60 mm3 (width×height×thickness mm3). Different stacked substrates are utilized for the satisfactory characteristics. Two identical radiating patches are printed on Roger 3,010 (ε r=10.2) and Alumina (ε r=9.4) substrate materials, respectively. In addition, various superstrate materials are considered and simulated to prevent short circuit the antenna while having a direct contact with the metallization, and achieve biocompatibility. Finally, superstrate material of Zirconia (ε r=29) is used to achieve biocompatibility and long-life. A finite element method is used to simulate the proposed hybrid model with commercially available Ansoft HFSS software.

Findings

The antenna is miniaturized, having dimensions of 10×8.4×2 mm3 (width×height×thickness mm3). The resonance frequency of the antenna is 2.4 GHz with a bandwidth of 100 MHz at return loss (S11) of better than −10 dB characteristics. Overall, the proposed antenna have 50 Ω impedance matching, −21 dB far field antenna gain, single-plane omni-directional radiation pattern properties and incident power of 5.3 mW to adhere Specific Absorption Rate regulation limit.

Originality/value

Vertically stacked three layer hybrid design have miniaturized characteristics, wide bandwidth, biocompatible, and stable characteristics in three layer human tissue model make this antenna suitable for implant biomedical monitor systems. The advanced simulation analysis of the proposed design constitutes the main contribution of the paper.

Details

COMPEL: The International Journal for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Mark van Hoorebeek, Stuart Walker and John Dermo

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the parameters of the duty of reasonable adjustment to facilitate access to e‐learning resources.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the parameters of the duty of reasonable adjustment to facilitate access to e‐learning resources.

Design/methodology/approach

Educational providers continue to develop new methods of delivering content in digital format, the increasing use of broadband, web‐based resources and new content creation software provides numerous methods of delivering excellence in content creation and delivery. It is important that this excellence is available to all; to this end the disability aspects of e‐learning provision are discussed in this paper, specifically relating to a anticipatory “duty of reasonable adjustment” to facilitate access to computer‐based learning resources within the UK education sector.

Findings

The paper concludes that the concept of reasonable adjustment is likely to remain unclear within the current statutory framework, is dynamic in relation to e‐learning software applications, and will continue to increase in scope and complexity as advanced software applications are used on a larger scale in the education sector.

Practical implications

After relating general accessibility approaches to the various open and proprietary source software applications and the concept of “lock in,” the paper argues that knowledge of reasonable adjustment is optimally considered in the early planning stage of development rather than after implementation, under the legislatively mandated anticipatory model. Further conclusions are presented which propose that the approaches described can be scaled up to provide general themes, which benefits the full spectrum of disability alongside the wider student cohort.

Originality/value

Further work is discussed and includes a potential UK extension of the analysis presented by Scroggins in 2007 concerning measurement and structural modeling of reasonableness under the provisions of the US Rehabilitation Act of 1998 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Tim Gorichanaz

Information is often defined in terms of meaning. Traditional theories of meaning, each with some drawbacks, have been rooted in language; but a more satisfactory theory…

Abstract

Information is often defined in terms of meaning. Traditional theories of meaning, each with some drawbacks, have been rooted in language; but a more satisfactory theory of meaning may be rooted in information. Meaning can be defined as coordinated action toward some end. In this sense, the meaning of something is the way it affords and constrains actions, and it is therefore inextricable from its context. Meaning can be discussed in several senses, including personal, social, environmental, historical, political, etc. Because information studies is concerned with the intersection of people and information, two key conceptualizations of meaning are personal meaning and social meaning. When activities have this meaningful dimension, they make a person's life feel more valuable and worth living, as a person and/or as a member of a group. In general, personal and social meaning include aspects such as purpose and connection with others.

Details

Information Experience in Theory and Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-368-5

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