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Stuart Redding, Richard Hobbs, Catia Nicodemo, Luigi Siciliani and Raphael Wittenberg

Purpose: In this chapter, we examine the National Health Service (NHS) and Adult Social Care (ASC) in England, focussing on policies that have been introduced since 2000…

Abstract

Purpose: In this chapter, we examine the National Health Service (NHS) and Adult Social Care (ASC) in England, focussing on policies that have been introduced since 2000 and considering the challenges that providers face in their quest to provide a high standard and affordable health service in the near future.

Methodology/Approach: We discuss recent policy developments and published analysis covering innovations within major aspects of health care (primary, secondary and tertiary) and ASC, before considering future challenges faced by providers in England, highlighted by a 2017 UK Parliament Select Committee.

Findings: The NHS and ASC system have experienced tightening budgets and serious financial pressure, with historically low real-terms growth in health funding from central government and local authorities. Policymakers have tried to overcome these challenges with several policy innovations, but many still remain. With large-scale investment and reform, there is potential for the health and social care system to evolve into a modern service capable of dealing with the needs of an ageing population. However, if these challenges are not met, then it is set to continue struggling with a lack of appropriate facilities, an overstretched staff and a system not entirely appropriate for its patients.

Details

The Sustainability of Health Care Systems in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-499-6

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Article

Qi Xu

Recognising interest in the nascent “rise of China”, the purpose of this paper is to engage with the normative social science approach to comparative management, positing…

Abstract

Purpose

Recognising interest in the nascent “rise of China”, the purpose of this paper is to engage with the normative social science approach to comparative management, positing that it is inadequate for an enlightened view of the Chinese subject.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a critical appraisal of extant literature, specifically Redding's The Spirit of Chinese Capitalism, by drawing resources from Fabian's epistemological critique of anthropology and Levinas' ethics to replace ontology as first philosophy, and by reference to historical studies on China's economic culture and its language.

Findings

Attention is drawn to how Redding's research subject is made an object of knowledge. In the objectification process, the subject's continuity is interrupted, its voice deprived, and its capacity for dialogue denied. This is evident in Redding's framework for analysis. Indeed, his Weberian social science template manifests a certain “imperialism of the same” and is symptomatic of much in comparative management regarding non‐western subjects. After critique, this essay then explores a supplement to Redding.

Practical implications

The paper proposes three principles for finding one's way out of objectification: ethics before “knowledge”, justice before “power”, and dialogue before “vision”.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to discourse on how comparative management must transcend its imperial social science legacy before it can find a just footing, and be born again.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 4 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Article

Thomas W.Y. Man and Theresa Lau

The context of Hong Kong has nurtured numerous small‐ and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in which the owner/managers have exhibited rather consistent set of…

Abstract

Purpose

The context of Hong Kong has nurtured numerous small‐ and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in which the owner/managers have exhibited rather consistent set of characteristics over decades despite shifts in the industrial structure. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how such characteristics can sustain in different industrial environments.

Design/methodology/approach

By using the competency approach on a sample of 153 SME owner/managers in the wholesale trade and IT services industries, we conducted hypothesis testing on comparing first, the overall rankings of ten competency areas for SME owner/managers, and second, the ratings of individual competency areas between the two industries.

Findings

While there are consistent patterns of competencies across these two contrasting industries in Hong Kong, the owner/managers in IT services industry have significantly higher ratings in innovative, strategic and learning competencies than those in the wholesale trade industry.

Research limitations/implications

Entrepreneurial competencies are not only stimulated or sharpened by the requirements of different industrial environments, but also rooted in the common socio‐cultural background of the owner/managers.

Practical implications

With the ever closer economic and socio‐cultural integration with China, a completely new pattern of entrepreneurial competencies may be required in a new context of entrepreneurship in Hong Kong.

Originality/value

The application of the competency approach allows us to investigate the respective impacts of industrial and socio‐cultural factors in the development of entrepreneurial characteristics, particularly those about Chinese SME owner/managers in Hong Kong.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article

Wilson Ng and Richard Thorpe

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and process of leadership in a mid‐sized, family‐controlled bank in Singapore in order to understand how it grew and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and process of leadership in a mid‐sized, family‐controlled bank in Singapore in order to understand how it grew and developed under family control.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on distributed leadership as a theoretical framework in exploring how a major corporate acquisition was conceived and undertaken to advance the bank's growth and development. Data were obtained through structured interviews with managers based on a three‐part discussion protocol following a pre‐interview questionnaire.

Findings

An “extended” system of leadership involving different levels of managers is developed that successfully completed the acquisition and produced significant growth from the combined businesses.

Research limitations/implications

Based on a single case, the paper does not claim that the observed phenomena are typical of mid‐sized family‐controlled businesses (FCBs). However, for scholars, the paper suggests how studying leadership practice in such FCBs may produce insights that challenge the popular view of an all‐powerful family leader by substituting a more nuanced perspective of a collaborative leadership system that facilitates entrepreneurial activity down the firm.

Practical implications

For managers, the study suggests how deeply developed collaboration among different levels of managers may produce competitive advantage for FCBs that seek further growth and development.

Social implications

It is suggested how further research of the growth processes of mid‐sized FCBs may maximize the value of entrepreneurial opportunities for their “extended” family of stakeholders, specifically for their customers with whom FCBs typically enjoy close relations.

Originality/value

The paper fills an empirical gap in the literature on competitive, mid‐sized FCBs by articulating a process in which a unique competency is developed for their ongoing survival as a family‐controlled enterprise.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Reference Reviews, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Book part

Vidu Badigannavar

The labor regulatory framework in India provides a conducive environment for social dialogue and collective participation in the organizational decision-making process…

Abstract

The labor regulatory framework in India provides a conducive environment for social dialogue and collective participation in the organizational decision-making process (Venkata Ratnam, 2009). Using data from a survey of workplace union representatives in the federal state of Maharashtra, India, this paper examines union experiences of social dialogue and collective participation in public services, private manufacturing, and private services sector. Findings indicate that collective worker participation and voice is at best modest in the public services but weak in the private manufacturing and private services. There is evidence of growing employer hostility to unions and employer refusal to engage in a meaningful social dialogue with unions. These findings are discussed within the political economy framework of employment relations in India examining the role of the state and judiciary in employment relations and, the links between political parties and trade unions in India.

Details

Employee Voice in Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-240-8

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Article

Joanne L. Scillitoe and Muthuraj Birasnav

The purpose of this study offers a theoretical model, hypotheses and empirical analyses of how formal and informal institutions influence the ease of market entry of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study offers a theoretical model, hypotheses and empirical analyses of how formal and informal institutions influence the ease of market entry of startups in the context of India.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model based upon institutional and market entry theories is presented with hypotheses. Structural equation modeling is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results of the study suggest that college preparations and a culture of creativity and innovation are positively related to ease of market entry by Indian startups. A culture of personal success is negatively related to ease of market entry. Government assistance related to ease of market entry is not significant.

Originality/value

This paper offers a new perspective, linking formal and informal institutional influences to startup ease of market entry. In addition, informal institutions are viewed from the cultures of personal success and creativity/innovation within the entrepreneurial domain, which is also new to the literature. This paper offers specific insights in the context of India startups and offers some interesting findings that can contribution to the literature, policy and practice.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

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Article

Mike W. Peng, Canan C. Mutlu, Steve Sauerwald, Kevin Y. Au and Denis Y.L. Wang

This paper aims to explore the interlock-performance relationship among mainland Chinese firms listed in Hong Kong by taking advantage of a relationship-intensive context…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the interlock-performance relationship among mainland Chinese firms listed in Hong Kong by taking advantage of a relationship-intensive context whereby such a link is likely to be especially important. Although strategic networks such as interlocking directorates have been found to affect a number of strategic behaviors, the link connecting board interlocks and corporate performance has remained ambiguous. Considerable light has been shed on the strategic networks of firms whose shares are listed abroad, which have been under-studied despite their rising importance in the global economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Data come from a particularly interesting historical period – the early 1990s prior to Hong Kong’s 1997 handover to China. Both quantitative and qualitative research have been used.

Findings

Empirically, it was found that good performance in an earlier period helps draw outside directors in a later period, and that network centrality and certain types of interlocks help improve performance, albeit with varying degrees. Overall, our results answer the question whether strategic networks such as interlocks matter for corporate performance with a qualified “yes”.

Originality/value

Taking advantage of a relationship-intensive context, this article explores the interlock-performance relationship among mainland Chinese firms listed in Hong Kong. Focus is specifically on the two years, 1993 and 1995, due to their specific historical importance because these two years represent the beginning of Chinese firms’ listing in Hong Kong.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article

T.K.P. Leung and Y.H. Wong

Guanxi has been a popular research topic but commentators do not have consensus on its ethical and positioning aspects. Attempts to tackle these two aspects and the…

Abstract

Guanxi has been a popular research topic but commentators do not have consensus on its ethical and positioning aspects. Attempts to tackle these two aspects and the problem of guanxi and favor according to a survey in a Sino‐Hong Kong business negotiation environment. Respondents perceived that there are four dimensions within the guanxi concept, i.e. opportunism, dynamism, business interaction, and protectionism. According to these four dimensions, they can be segmented into three clusters, i.e. the preserver, the wiser, and the braver. Different clusters have different psychological approaches to Sino‐foreign negotiation but there is no difference in their perceptions towards the relationship between guanxi and favor. Concludes that guanxi is basically ethical and it can be used as a positioning strategy in China. However, there is some evidence to suggest that guanxi and favor are sensitive and situation‐specific, but further research is needed to confirm these claims.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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