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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2019

Kumar Rakesh Ranjan and Stuart Read

Despite the increasing prominence of value co-creation (VCC) in extant research, the area of customer co-creation is in its infancy and many aspects are not…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the increasing prominence of value co-creation (VCC) in extant research, the area of customer co-creation is in its infancy and many aspects are not well-understood. This paper aims to important work from the individual psychology literature with the concept of VCC and offers empirical evidence to untested theoretical claims regarding the role of the individual in VCC.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation begins with reviews of the literature of individual psychology and VCC to compare the concepts they use to explain the role of the individual in co-creation. The results of the theoretical development are empirically derived using a multiple vignette-based study to examine relationships between individual characteristics and the activity of VCC.

Findings

The authors find a positive effect of a customer’s prosocial orientation, perspective taking and involvement on VCC. However, a customer’s extraversion does not affect the degree of VCC. The desire-to-participate mediates these relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers a foundation for some of the central claims about VCC and encourages a precise understanding of the impact of individual customer psychology in value co-creation with firms. Implications for the service-dominant logic of marketing and core work in psychology are discussed.

Practical implications

Managers seeking to design co-creative ecosystems need to know about the individuals they are co-creating with. In this research, the authors clearly exemplify how managers can use in practice a theoretical understanding of individuals to better direct the activity of VCC.

Originality/value

This paper provides both new theoretical knowledge from the parallel literature review and exciting empirical results from the authors’ investigation into phenomenological claims regarding VCC.

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Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2005

David E. Woolwine and E. Doyle McCarthy

Gay men in the New York City metropolitan area were interviewed from 1990 to 1991, during the period of the AIDS epidemic. Using an interview schedule, they were asked…

Abstract

Gay men in the New York City metropolitan area were interviewed from 1990 to 1991, during the period of the AIDS epidemic. Using an interview schedule, they were asked questions about “coming out of the closet” and other identity issues: their experiences of “difference,” beliefs about monogamous or “open” relationships, and their views about sex and commitment. The study's focus was on the men's “moral discourse” or their relationship to the “good,” including ideas of the self, other(s), friendship, love, sex, and commitment. The study yielded a consistency in the men's responses: they did not wish to impose on other gay men their own convictions about being gay, sex, and intimate relationships. Their talk was tentative, localized, highly personal, and “nonjudgmental” on a range of identity and moral issues. These findings are discussed by relating the men's life experiences to the gay culture they shared: their unwillingness to judge others reflects their own formative experiences of “coming out” in a society that judged gay men harshly and who, in later years, lived at the time of the AIDS crisis.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1186-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Scott Fernie, Stuart D. Green and Stephanie J. Weller

Requirements management (RM), as practised in the aerospace and defence sectors, attracts interest from construction researchers in response to longstanding problems of…

Abstract

Requirements management (RM), as practised in the aerospace and defence sectors, attracts interest from construction researchers in response to longstanding problems of project definition. Doubts are expressed whether RM offers a new discipline for construction practitioners or whether it repeats previous exhortations to adopt a more disciplined way of working. Whilst systems engineering has an established track record of addressing complex technical problems, its extension to socially complex problems has been challenged. The dominant storyline of RM is one of procedural rationality and RM is commonly presented as a means of controlling dilettante behaviour. Interviews with RM practitioners suggest a considerable gulf between the dominant storyline in the literature and how practitioners operate in practice. The paper challenges construction researchers interested in RM to reflect more upon the theoretical debates that underpin current equivalent practices in construction and the disparity between espoused and enacted practice.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1978

TWO MASSIVE works of scholarship recently published by the Clarendon Press—Edward Graves' A bibliography of English history to 1485 (1975) and H J Hanham's Bibliography of

Abstract

TWO MASSIVE works of scholarship recently published by the Clarendon Press—Edward Graves' A bibliography of English history to 1485 (1975) and H J Hanham's Bibliography of British History 1851–1914(1976)—have brought close to fruition a project originally proposed over ninety years ago by Henry R Tedder, for many years both secretary and librarian of the Athenaeum. In fact it was at the 1885 Plymouth meeting of the Library Association that he first read a paper advocating the preparation of a bibliography of national history.

Details

New Library World, vol. 79 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Abstract

Details

Property Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Alex M. Andrew

Selections from topics discussed on the CybCom list over a particularly active period in early 2006 are reviewed. These include the relevance of autopoiesis to sociology…

Abstract

Purpose

Selections from topics discussed on the CybCom list over a particularly active period in early 2006 are reviewed. These include the relevance of autopoiesis to sociology, courses of instruction on cybernetics, cybernetics applied to social theory, the “ethical imperative” of von Foerster, and Günther's “polylogic”. Other lists on the internet are also described.

Design/methodology/approach

The aim is to review developments on the internet, especially those of general cybernetic interest.

Findings

The relevance of autopoiesis to sociology is dubious; various courses of instruction exist but cyberneticians should try to enhance visibility; information flows in social systems have useful correspondence to those in living organisms; the “ethical imperative” is not a universal rule; “polylogic” is of interest but not yet embodied in a working computer.

Practical implications

The CybCom list, and others mentioned, are valuable sources of stimulating material.

Originality/value

It is hoped this is a valuable periodic review.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Stuart Read and David Robertson

The purpose of this paper is to offer learning from NetFlix's open innovation strategy to other firms considering implementing open innovation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer learning from NetFlix's open innovation strategy to other firms considering implementing open innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint looks at the case study of NetFlix.

Findings

The paper finds four generalizeable aspects of NetFlix’ open innovation strategy that may be useful to other firms considering implementing open innovation.

Originality/value

This is a strategy implementation piece and is an original work based on a current case study.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

Clive Bingley, Elaine Kempson and John Buchanan

IT REALLY IS very hard to have one's kindliest intentions kicked back into one's teeth.

Abstract

IT REALLY IS very hard to have one's kindliest intentions kicked back into one's teeth.

Details

New Library World, vol. 77 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Stuart Millson

Abstract

Details

European Business Review, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Nicholas Dew and Stuart Read

Tucked in the back of Venkataraman’s 1997 work on the distinctive domain of entrepreneurship (DDE) lies a pointer to a question each individual must face when choosing to…

Abstract

Tucked in the back of Venkataraman’s 1997 work on the distinctive domain of entrepreneurship (DDE) lies a pointer to a question each individual must face when choosing to start a new venture; “is entrepreneurship worth it?” Inventorying costs associated with risk, uncertainty, and illiquidity against surpluses from financial and psychological factors unique to entrepreneurship, Venkataraman tempts readers to tally entrepreneurial returns. The authors summarize and integrate an academic study of these various cost and return components over the past 20 years using Venkataraman’s original framework. The authors find the answer to the question of “is entrepreneurship worth it?” varies with time. Researcher’s answer to the question has shifted from an early view that entrepreneurs sacrifice financial gain in exchange for soft psychological benefits to a more positive view that entrepreneurs are rewarded both financially and psychologically for the unique costs borne in the DDE. But the rewards are not immediate. In entrepreneur time, break-even emerges by gradually overcoming an initial deficit. As surpluses accrue, returns to entrepreneurs likely eventually exceed those of their wage-earning peers.

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