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Article

Morgan P. Miles, Stuart Crispin and Chickery J. Kasouf

The purpose of this paper is to better define the contribution of entrepreneurship to the advancement of marketing thought.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better define the contribution of entrepreneurship to the advancement of marketing thought.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a literature review that uses examples from the literature to propose new research directions.

Findings

The paper proposes research opportunities, and concludes that the contributions of entrepreneurship to normative macro‐marketing are largely absent.

Practical implications

The marketing/entrepreneurship interface continues to be a connection that is difficult to define. Yet, it is an area with rich research potential, and it is critical that marketing embraces these opportunities to strengthen its strategic focus as a discipline.

Originality/value

The paper integrates literature from a variety of perspectives from marketing and related fields, and maps the marketing/entrepreneurship interface on Hunt's classification schema.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article

Dirk Reiser and Stuart Crispin

The purpose of this paper is to explore local perceptions of the process of place reimaging, and the forces that influence this process. As locals engage with a place more…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore local perceptions of the process of place reimaging, and the forces that influence this process. As locals engage with a place more frequently than visitors, they are better placed to get an “insider's view” of reimaging and the forces that influence the process.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study method is employed in this paper. The case area is the Sullivans Cove waterfront precinct, located in the Australian City of Hobart. Between 1972 and 2006 this area underwent a process of reimaging; changing from a working port to a tourism, arts and entertainment precinct. Primary data are collected through semi‐structured interviews with representatives from local interest group. Secondary data are also collected from a range of government and non‐government sources.

Findings

The findings of this paper are twofold. First, it finds that locals are actively engaged in the process of reimaging and are broadly accepting of the reimaging process. Second, locals identified a number of forces that influenced the process of reimaging within Sullivans Cove, and that the interplay between these factors create a more multifaceted place image.

Originality/value

Little extant research has explored local perceptions of the reimaging process, and this paper brings new insights into this process.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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Article

Gemma Lewis, Stuart Crispin, Laurie Bonney, Megan Woods, Jiangang Fei, Sarah Ayala and Morgan Miles

The purpose of this paper is to explore how traditional agribusiness firms can differentiate their product through innovation and branding at the value chain level…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how traditional agribusiness firms can differentiate their product through innovation and branding at the value chain level, through the application of entrepreneurial marketing (EM). Traditionally, fresh vegetable products have been marketed as unbranded commodities.

Design/methodology/approach

To address the research aim, this paper used a case study, which included semi-structured interviews with managers and personnel and unstructured observation of supply chain processes.

Findings

The findings are based on a Tasmanian fresh broccoli value chain and suggest that EM could be effectively integrated at a multi-firm level. Clear communication, knowledge sharing, and trusting relationships are necessary to create a shared vision and a sustainable value chain.

Research limitations/implications

An increasing number of firms in the agribusiness sector are looking for strategies that can enhance value for themselves and members of their chain. EM as a strategy can help an entire value chain achieve product differentiation and co-innovation, with flow on benefits to the consumer.

Originality/value

There is limited research at the entrepreneurial and marketing interface that explores the application of EM at an inter-organizational level. This paper is one of the first to investigate EM in context of a supply chain management, using a value chain innovation framework.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article

Stuart Crispin, Phil Hancock, Sally Amanda Male, Caroline Baillie, Cara MacNish, Jeremy Leggoe, Dev Ranmuthugala and Firoz Alam

The purpose of this paper is to explore: student perceptions of threshold concepts and capabilities in postgraduate business education, and the potential impacts of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore: student perceptions of threshold concepts and capabilities in postgraduate business education, and the potential impacts of intensive modes of teaching on student understanding of threshold concepts and development of threshold capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The student experience of learning was studied in two business units: strategic management, and accounting. The method involved two phases. In the first, students and unit coordinators identified and justified potential threshold concepts and capabilities. In the second, themes were rationalized.

Findings

Significantly more so in intensive mode, the opportunity to ask questions was reported by student participants to support their development of the nominated threshold capabilities. This and other factors reported by students to support their learning in intensive mode are consistent with supporting students to traverse the liminal space within the limited time available in intensive mode.

Research limitations/implications

Respondents from future cohorts will address the small participant numbers. Studies in only two units are reported. Studies in other disciplines are presented elsewhere.

Practical implications

The findings will be important to educators using intensive mode teaching in business, and researchers working within the framework.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore the potential impacts of intensive modes of teaching on student understanding of threshold concepts and development of threshold capabilities.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 58 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Content available

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article

J. Widgery

March 17, 1967 Trade Dispute — Act in furtherance of — Trade union official threatening to induce strike action by employees unless workman rejoins union — Whether threat

Abstract

March 17, 1967 Trade Dispute — Act in furtherance of — Trade union official threatening to induce strike action by employees unless workman rejoins union — Whether threat to induce breach of contract of employment — Employers dismissing work‐man by notice under his contract of service — Whether dismissal resulting from unlawful conspiracy — Whether act of inducement actionable at suit of dismissed work‐man when based on intimidation — Whether protected by section 3 of the Trade Disputes Act, 1906 — Whether justifiable — Trade Disputes Act, 1906 (6 Edw. VII, c. 47) ss. 3, 5.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article

Jean O'Neill Uhl

To increase support for teacher education programs in colleges and universities through the development of the curriculum materials center (CMC).

Abstract

Purpose

To increase support for teacher education programs in colleges and universities through the development of the curriculum materials center (CMC).

Design/methodology/approach

Through statistics drawn from a student survey and departmental records of the C.W. Post CMC, along with the perspective of the author, the development of a CMC as support for a teacher education program is explored. The paper provides insight into various necessary collections and services that the center should offer.

Findings

General historical information is offered. The paper also provides information on key collections found in a CMC. Successful approaches to development and creative application of instruction are discussed.

Practical implications

This paper provides clear and useful information, including but not limited to suggested author lists, a professional collection bibliography, and software ideas. The objective is to improve the development, functionality and service in a CMC.

Originality/value

Arguably, this study is the first to examine and promote in detail the CMC as support for teacher education programs in colleges and universities.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Article

Michel Dion

– The purpose of this paper is to describe philosophical positions about money laundering activities, depending on the way one looks at ethics and law.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe philosophical positions about money laundering activities, depending on the way one looks at ethics and law.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes four philosophical positions about money laundering activities, given that one accepts/refuses to make connections between ethics and law. It explores the pitfalls of each philosophical position.

Findings

The sceptical way (ethical relativism) asserts that there cannot be any intrinsic notion of good/evil. The legally focused way (legal positivism) presupposes that ethics is irrelevant, when lawmakers are doing their job. The distorting way (legal moralism) takes for granted that lawmakers are deciding what is moral/immoral. The ethically focused way (normative ethics) means that ethics say something different than law. Each of the four philosophical positions about money laundering has its own pitfalls.

Practical implications

The four philosophical positions could influence the way ethical concerns are institutionalized in the organizational setting. Managers could better distinguish ethical discourse and legal/judicial realm. Ethical training sessions could be used to make organizational members circumscribing their moral duties, as to the detection/prevention of money laundering activities. Qualitative surveys could help to better understand if such philosophical positions are relevant for decision-making processes and philosophical questioning about ethical issues.

Originality/value

The paper addresses the issue of money laundering, from both a legal and moral perspectives. It is at the edge of ethics and philosophy of law.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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