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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Burna Nayar and Surabhi Koul

The millennial students are disengaged in the current classrooms. Hence, there is a definite need to evaluate and compare the current learning tools. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

The millennial students are disengaged in the current classrooms. Hence, there is a definite need to evaluate and compare the current learning tools. The purpose of this paper is to assess the effects of three learning tools – listening, structured doodling and note-taking – on recall ability of students in the classroom. The authors have specifically compared the effect of Andrade’s (2010) and Boggs et al.’s (2017) structured doodling condition (i.e. shading in shapes) vis-à-vis note-taking and listening.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental research design was used for the study where three groups of around 40 participants each were created. The participants were Indian students (72 males and 48 females) who were undergraduates at NMIMS University, Navi Mumbai. Each group experienced all the three learning methods that are listening, note-taking and structured doodling. It was a 3×3 mixed model design. Listening, note-taking and structured doodling were compared on recall ability. This was assessed using a questionnaire extracted from Boggs et al.’s (2017) study and a self-designed evaluation sheet.

Findings

Across all three groups, structured doodling and note-taking had a higher impact on recall ability than the traditional method. However, the difference in the impact of note-taking and doodling on recall ability was not practically very large. The current finding assumes higher significance in the Indian education set up as Indian students are accustomed to note-taking as a learning tool yet structured doodling had a statistically analogous effect on recall ability compared to a systematically documented note-taking. Hence, a future direction could be to assess the impact of a blended learning tool that utilizes both note-taking and doodling or note-taking through doodling.

Research limitations/implications

First, the authors did not capture doodling habits of the students. Second, the study limits itself to a small sample size of 120 management graduates. The study can be extended to other disciplines like science and technology and also on how the higher engagement learning tools can be utilized in the normal environs of a course in a classroom. A future direction of the study can be to engage students in an activity as long as a regular lecture of about 60 min. A fusion of learning tools that effectively combines note-taking and doodling can be suggested to enhance recall ability and classroom engagement.

Practical implications

Higher order learning tools characteristically require technologically advanced infrastructure setups. In developing economies like India, most educational institutes may not have access to technologically advanced classrooms; hence, the implementation of higher engagement learning tools becomes a huge challenge. The endeavor in this study has been to study the impact and effectiveness of learning tools like doodling and note-taking which do not inherently call for access to advanced technology.

Social implications

In today’s age of globalization, emerging economies like India are seen to be taking center stage. Thus, ensuring that Indian education system is geared up to train students to compete globally and in the same vein, these students have access to higher engagement learning tools – the absolute need of the hour. Hence, the current research aims to bridge the gap between global education innovations and Indian classroom teaching method implementation.

Originality/value

The research has assessed the effectiveness of three different learning tools, namely – listening, note-taking and structured doodling – in Indian higher education setup. The current research is in harmony with the current literature and would function as an adaptation and augmentation of Andrade’s (2010) and Boggs et al. (2017) studies. A very scanty research body on understanding the impact of learning tools on recall ability exists in the Indian education setup. Current research will act as a bridge between global path breaking education research and implementation of in-class teaching methods in Indian higher education.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Investment Traps Exposed
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-253-4

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Michael Charles, Ben Farr-Wharton, Tania von der Heidt and Neroli Sheldon

The purpose of this paper is to investigate examiner reactions to doctorate of business administration (DBA) theses at an Australian university applying Perry’s structured

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate examiner reactions to doctorate of business administration (DBA) theses at an Australian university applying Perry’s structured approach to thesis presentation, which had its origin in the marketing discipline, but is now widely applied to other business disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines 49 DBA examiner reports relating to 19 DBA theses using the structured Perry approach, with emphasis paid to comments relating to thesis structure and presentation. Only those theses that acknowledged Perry or demonstrated Perry-like characteristics were interrogated.

Findings

The use of Perry’s structured approach can lead to DBA theses that place excessive emphasis on description rather than practical outcomes, as should occur with a professional doctorate, and also fosters excessive repetition and scaffolding that unduly interferes with the candidate’s “story telling”. Many examiners found theses using Perry’s structured approach problematic, particularly with respect to a lack of integration with the literature and reflection on the findings in relation to previous studies.

Research limitations/implications

The use of Perry’s structured approach potentially acts as a further barrier to DBA theses, and other professional doctorates by extension, sufficiently differentiating themselves from PhDs. This has implications for the examination of such theses, which are sometimes viewed as lower-quality PhDs instead of professional doctorates.

Originality/value

Applying a traditional PhD thesis structure, such as the model advocated by Perry with its use of five chapters, to DBA theses potentially exacerbates existing professional doctorate “image” issues, thereby leading to ambiguity for examiners and the candidates themselves.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 59 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

K.C. Chen, Friderica Widyasari Dewi and Lijie Zhu

Stock Participation Accreting Redemption Quarterly-pay Securities (SPARQS), a service mark of Morgan Stanley, represent another form of equity-linked structured notes. The…

Abstract

Stock Participation Accreting Redemption Quarterly-pay Securities (SPARQS), a service mark of Morgan Stanley, represent another form of equity-linked structured notes. The SPARQS generally provide the investors with higher interest payments that substantially exceed the market interest rate for corresponding standard bonds, in exchange for a call feature. The call option limits the potential appreciation of the SPARQS in case the underlying common stock price rises. Moreover, the SPARQS are mandatorily convertible at maturity that entail more risk than ordinary debts due to the possibility that investors might not receive their principal amount in case the underlying common stock price declines. This paper derives a general pricing formula for the SPARQS using the binomial tree approach. An empirical test of a specific SPARQS issue indicates that the binomial tree model is quite accurate.

Details

Research in Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-277-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Hubert D. Glover and Wanda A. Wallace

This study conducted a comprehensive analysis of the ASB's voting activities for 45 SASs issued over a 12‐year period. The results support earlier studies by Kinney and…

Abstract

This study conducted a comprehensive analysis of the ASB's voting activities for 45 SASs issued over a 12‐year period. The results support earlier studies by Kinney and others that members' respective firm characteristics are strongly associated with their voting behavior. However, while Kinney posited that structured firms investment in audit methodology resulted in more support for new standards due to lower opportunity costs to adopt a new SAS, this study identifies such firms' greater propensity to vote against SASs. This study supports Kinney's (1986) “political cost” hypothesis regarding ASB members' reluctancy to vote against an SAS. This study also supports the relationship between firm characteristics such as audit structure and ASB member voting patterns. Overall, the results suggest that the ASB provides a democratic forum for large and small firms to equally participate in the standard‐setting process. The diversified membership of the ASB appears to result in no systematic dominant influence, other than potentially by the chair position.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 23 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Abstract

Details

Navigating the Investment Minefield
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-053-0

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Stephen Keith McGrath and Stephen Jonathan Whitty

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the confusion among project management practitioners about the role of steering committees.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the confusion among project management practitioners about the role of steering committees.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with highly experienced participants selected from a range of industries and disciplines in Queensland, Australia.

Findings

Six separate confusions on the role of steering committees were identified within that practitioner community. However, despite participants expressing various opposing views, they had actually come to the same working arrangements for their committees; all that was missing was a common conceptualisation of these working arrangements and consistent terminology.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides clear evidence to the academic literature that confusion over the role of steering committees actually exists within the practitioner community and identifies six separate ways in which this occurs. It also identifies a problematic error in the widely used PRINCE2 governance model. Clarity in committee governance arrangements will facilitate future research endeavours through the removal of confusion surrounding committee labelling and accountability.

Practical implications

A committee decision tree model that guards against all six confusions is proposed for practitioner use, providing a means of avoiding unnecessary internal conflict within organisational governance arrangements. It can be used to check terms of reference of existing or proposed committees, facilitating organisational efficiency and effectiveness. The suggested renaming of project control groups to project coordination groups, and discontinuance of the practice of labelling committees that cannot authorise their decisions as either steering committees or boards, further supports this.

Social implications

Reconciliation of terminology with actual practice and the consequent clarity of governance arrangements can facilitate building social and physical systems and infrastructure, benefitting organisations, whether public, charitable or private.

Originality/value

Clarity regarding committee accountability can avoid confusion, misunderstanding and their consequent waste of time, resources and money.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 November 2014

Hanki Seong and Sang Bin Lee

This paper examines which basis functions are efficient to employ a combined method of Hull and White (1990) with the Monte Carlo simulation when we price a callable range…

Abstract

This paper examines which basis functions are efficient to employ a combined method of Hull and White (1990) with the Monte Carlo simulation when we price a callable range note or a callable bond. We use the Huge and Rom-Poulsen (2007) method which has modified the least squared Monte Carlo simulation proposed by Longstaff and Schwartz (2001) to reduce the estimation errors of the continuation value or the underlying assets. To use Monte carlo Simulation for pricing the early exercise premium, it is essential to accurately estimate the continuation value, because the investors will choose the higher value between the exercise and the continuation value at the possible early exercise dates. The main purpose of this paper is to analyze the estimation errors originating from the choice of the basis functions for the underlying asset and the continuation value estimation.

We choose the callable bond and the callable range accrual note to show which basis functions are reliable to reduce the estimation errors. For this purpose, we replicate the callable range accrual note with a portfolio of a fixed rate bond and a delayed digital option. We use several basis functions such as a constant, the instantaneous interest rates, and the range in order to see which basis function is efficient for our purpose. We examine several combinations of the basis functions depending on which basis functions will be used for the underlying asset or the continuation value estimation. We show that the range which is an important determinant of the callable range accrual note is an effective basis function to accurately determine the underlying asset and the continuation value for the pricing of the callable range accrual note.

Details

Journal of Derivatives and Quantitative Studies, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2713-6647

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Max Völkel and Heiko Haller

The purpose of the paper is to design a model and tools that are capable of representing and handling personal knowledge in different degrees of structuredness and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to design a model and tools that are capable of representing and handling personal knowledge in different degrees of structuredness and formalisation, and usable and extensible by end‐users.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the results of analysing literature and various data models and formalisms used to structure information on the desktop.

Findings

The unified data model (CDS) is capable of representing structures from various information tools, including documents, file systems, hypertext, tagging and mind maps. The five knowledge axes of CDS are identity, order, hierarchy, annotation and linking.

Research limitations/implications

The CDS model is based on text. Extensions for multimedia annotations have not been investigated.

Practical implications

Future personal knowledge management (PKM) tools should take the mentioned shortcoming of existing PKM tools into account. Implementing the CDS model can be a way to make PKM tools interoperable.

Originality/value

This paper presents research combining cognitive psychology, personal knowledge management and semantic web technologies. The CDS model provides a way to let end‐users work on different levels of granularity and different levels of formality in one environment.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2012

Mark Shipman

The paper aims to explain regulatory issues and considerations as to future regulatory changes that Chinese regulators may implement with regard to the Qualified Foreign…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explain regulatory issues and considerations as to future regulatory changes that Chinese regulators may implement with regard to the Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor (QFII) regime.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes: the regulators responsible for QFII; the relevant regulations; the qualification process, including eligibility requirements and the regulators' preference for qualifying long‐term, buy‐side institutional investors (usually pension funds, insurance companies and mutual funds); the concept of the “open‐ended China fund”; rules governing the remittance and repatriation of capital and the lock‐up period; a provision that prohibits QFIIs from transferring or selling their quotas (for example, to create structured products offering their customers synthetic exposure to the Chinese securities market); available account structures; the investment process, including investment restrictions, required disclosure of interests, the short swing profit rule, over‐purchases and erroneous trades, stock index futures trading, and insider dealing and manipulation of the market; withholding taxes; and recent developments.

Findings

China's QFII regime has been a key component of China's staged opening up of its financial markets, in particular its public securities market, permitting foreign investors to gain access to the previously restricted RMB denominated A share market under relatively strict regulatory oversight.

Originality/value

Practical guidance from an experienced financial services lawyer is provided.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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