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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Christopher Dick

To date, research on sponsorship considers the effects of only positive or only negative sponsorship information on consumers’ attitudes toward the sponsor brand. However…

Abstract

Purpose

To date, research on sponsorship considers the effects of only positive or only negative sponsorship information on consumers’ attitudes toward the sponsor brand. However, in practice, sometimes mixed information (positive and negative) is available that influences consumers’ sponsor evaluations. To mirror the information situation of the real world, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how the valence of sponsorship information (only positive vs mixed vs only negative) and the strength of sponsorship information (weak vs strong) influence the consumers’ attitudes toward the sponsor brand.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses an experimental research design (n=210). Data were collected among students of a German university.

Findings

The results reveal that when the strength of information was weak, attitudes in the mixed information condition were not significantly worse than in the only positive condition and significantly better than in the only negative condition. In addition, when the strength of information was strong, attitudes in the mixed information condition were significantly worse than in the only positive condition and significantly better than in the only negative condition.

Practical implications

This study offers several practical recommendations regarding the sponsors’ evaluation of their investments and the decision to maintain or exit the sponsorship of a controversial object.

Originality/value

This study expands the research on the effects of available sponsorship information on consumers’ sponsor evaluation. The present research highlights the effects of different types of sponsorship information on consumers’ attitudes and considers the strength of information as a boundary condition of these effects.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Yu Che, Yongqiang Li, Kim-Shyan Fam and Xuan Bai

This study aims to examine the underlying mechanism of buyer–seller ties and salespeople’s performance. Also examined was the moderating effects of the density of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the underlying mechanism of buyer–seller ties and salespeople’s performance. Also examined was the moderating effects of the density of the customer network in which the salesperson is embedded.

Design/methodology/approach

The study developed a framework incorporating five key variables: strength of ties, network benefits, network density, sales effectiveness and sales revenue. The framework was tested using data from insurance companies in China.

Findings

Process regression and stepwise regression results indicated that information, influence and solidarity benefit will mediate the effects of strength of ties on sales effectiveness both when taken as a set and separately. Information, influence and solidarity benefit will mediate the effects of strength of ties on sales revenue when taken as a set, but only influence will mediate the effect separately. In addition, the positive relationship between strength of ties and solidarity benefit is weaker when network density is high.

Practical implications

Sales managers should initiate trainings and workshops about how to obtain high-quality information from customers, improving influencing power and establishing solidarity with customers. Moreover, salespeople should avoid conducting business with a group of customers if they are densely connected to one another.

Originality/value

On the one hand, this study contributes to the underlying mechanism research on buyer–seller ties and sales performance. On the other hand, it contributes to the contingency research on sales performance and the development of social network theory.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Feirong Yuan and Richard W. Woodman

Much of the literature in organizational change has taken a single approach to explain employee expectation formation regarding the outcomes of a change event. A…

Abstract

Much of the literature in organizational change has taken a single approach to explain employee expectation formation regarding the outcomes of a change event. A conceptual model is developed to integrate two existing streams of research (the information effects approach and the social effects approach) and to develop a comprehensive picture of outcome expectation formation. We propose that information and social effects function simultaneously to shape an employee's outcome expectations. The strength and content consistency of information and social effects jointly determine what people expect regarding change outcomes and how confident they feel about those expectations. Implications are discussed in terms of setting the boundaries for information and social effects as well as future research directions.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-425-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

James Brook

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the adoption of strengths‐focused human resources (HR) can deliver measurable business returns, from hard results such as…

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990

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the adoption of strengths‐focused human resources (HR) can deliver measurable business returns, from hard results such as increased revenues and reduced costs, to “lead” indicators of future success: for example better customer engagement, improved morale, discretionary effort and personal wellbeing. The author, from specialist provider, Strengths Partnership, aims to explain how to identify and extract the “strengths DNA” from each individual and to build a convincing business case for the use of strengths, in all its different contexts, within the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The central methodology in this paper is extracted from Strengths Partnership's leading Strengthscope assessment tool, designed to help individuals understand their standout strengths; the unintended consequences that may arise when strengths go into overdrive; the extent to which they are able to productively apply their strengths at work; and how visible their strengths are to others. The information is based on seven years of research conducted by Strengths Partnership into identifying, optimizing and developing strengths in organizations, supported by a growing body of published research and literature in positive psychology and strengths‐based approaches to organizational effectiveness.

Findings

If they can surmount the challenge of how to embed this approach into their HR life cycle and core HR activities, organizations will see a major paradigm shift from an emphasis on fixing weaknesses to one that encourages a person's natural energies and inclinations in the pursuit of success.

Research limitations/implications

HR and learning and development professionals need a different set of principles and tools to get the most out of the strengths approach and to ensure it becomes part of the organization's DNA. Without these, the approach is unlikely to deliver real value beyond the initial feel‐good factor that invariably arises during an initial strengths training program.

Originality/value

More research and tool development is needed in this area; however the ideas and approaches in this article will help to embed the strengths approach throughout the employee life cycle – from hiring and selection, through team development, development and culture change.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1988

A.J. Duncalf and B.G. Dale

In every manufacturing company, irrespective of size, product and other variables, management are constantly involved in quality‐related decisions which have a direct…

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320

Abstract

In every manufacturing company, irrespective of size, product and other variables, management are constantly involved in quality‐related decisions which have a direct effect on product quality. An analytical method is described for assessing an organisation's approach to quality management. On application, managers are provided with information on the reality of their quality assurance activities. An overview of some of the issues involved in decision making is provided, followed by an outline of the research methodology, and, finally, the “method” is presented with some results arising from its application.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Ronald van Eijk, Alfons Salden, Johan de Heer, Arjan Peddemors, Petri Määttä and Ville Haataja

The increasing number of context aware services, which depend on various multimodal sensing, processing and actuating techniques, technologies and formats ask for a…

Abstract

The increasing number of context aware services, which depend on various multimodal sensing, processing and actuating techniques, technologies and formats ask for a physical framework that is able to handle their heterogeneity. Thereto, we propose a context model bridging the semantic gaps between context aware services. In addition we propose a simple system architecture of Distribution Servers and Transformation Servers that bridge semantic gaps among context aware services. Applying our framework we solve the heterogeneity problem existing for location services. Location is typically a form of context where heterogeneity is a problem.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Ian Anderson and Henk Muller

A cell phone that behaves in a manner reflective of the current context has been a goal for the pervasive and ubiquitous research communities for a long time. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

A cell phone that behaves in a manner reflective of the current context has been a goal for the pervasive and ubiquitous research communities for a long time. This paper aims to demonstrate how two aspects of context – location and activity – can be inferred using GSM data present on standard cell phones.

Design/methodology/approach

A background knowledge of GSM networks is provided, followed by an assessment of the stability of signal strength levels in order to establish their usefulness in inferring aspects of context. A qualitative location system using GSM signals is presented and how to infer the current activity of the cell phone carrier is demonstrated.

Findings

The paper shows that by using the patterns of signal strength fluctuations and changes to the current serving cell and monitored neighbouring cells it is possible to distinguish between various states of movement such as walking, driving a car and remaining stationary.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on the practical aspects of deploying and managing location based services in dynamic outdoor environments.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Patrick De Pelsmacker, Verolien Cauberghe and Nathalie Dens

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of level of graphic threat (weak and strong) and the amount of information (low and high) on message effectiveness…

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1600

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of level of graphic threat (weak and strong) and the amount of information (low and high) on message effectiveness for an unfamiliar (a muscle disorder due to lack of physical exercise) vs a familiar (injuries as a result of traffic accidents due to drunk driving) issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The method employed was experimental 2 (issue familiarity: unfamiliar, familiar issue)×2 (amount of information: low, high)×2 (graphic threat level: weak, strong) full factorial between‐subjects design. Data are collected from a sample of 206 Belgians.

Findings

It was found that a strong graphic threat message has a greater effect for an unfamiliar than for a familiar issue. For a familiar issue, adding information to a weak threat appeal increases perceived severity. For an unfamiliar issue, adding information to a strong graphic threat appeal has a similar effect. Perceived severity of threat, perceived probability of occurrence, evoked fear and perceived coping efficacy have a significant effect on the intention to adopt the recommended behavior. For an unfamiliar issue, perceived efficacy and perceived probability of occurrence primarily have the greatest impact on coping intention. For a familiar issue, perceived severity, evoked fear and perceived efficacy determine coping intention.

Practical implications

The results substantially support the use of different message tactics for health threats that are either new or familiar for the target group.

Originality/value

Most studies have limited themselves to studying the impact of threat strength on perceived threat and response efficacy, on evoked fear and on message acceptance. The present study adds the contextual and message elements, namely issue familiarity and amount of information provided, the link of which with threat appeal has – as far to the authors' knowledge never been studied before in one integrated analysis.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Mohamed Ibrahim and Mohamed Shehata

Hogarth and Einhorn (1990) posited a psychological model for updating beliefs that is based on an anchoring and adjustment process which incorporates a contrast or…

Abstract

Hogarth and Einhorn (1990) posited a psychological model for updating beliefs that is based on an anchoring and adjustment process which incorporates a contrast or surprise effect; in particular, the larger the current belief in a hypothesis or outcome, the more it is discounted by negative information and the less it is increased by positive information. The model provides a set of predictions that could be of important implications for financial decisions. It predicts strong recency effects for mixed or conflicting information (negative and positive), and no order effects for consistent information (all positive or all negative). Furthermore, an earlier version of the model (1985) predicts that simultaneous processing of consistent information leads to more extreme responses than the sequential processing of the same information. Einhorn and Hogarth refer to this phenomenon as a “dilution effect.” This paper reports the results of testing these qualitative predictions of the belief updating model. Three experiments involving a content rich scenario of asset valuation judgment were conducted using a sample of 120 subjects enroled in two MBA courses. The results support the model's prediction that there is no order effects attributable to sequential processing of consistent information. The results also support the existence of recency effects for mixed information regardless of the response mode. However, no significant effects were observed for processing consistent information under different response modes.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Swapnil K. Shirsath and Subhash C. Yaragal

This study reports the performance of thermally deteriorated concrete with and without fibres. Attempts have been made to find the suitable performance of steel…

Abstract

Purpose

This study reports the performance of thermally deteriorated concrete with and without fibres. Attempts have been made to find the suitable performance of steel polypropylene (PP) hybrid fibre combination that could significantly enhance the performance of mechanical properties at elevated temperatures.

Design/methodology/approach

In this experimental investigation, concrete cubes of 100 mm in size of various compositions were cast and water-cured for 28 days, and later exposed to elevated temperatures of either 200 or 400°C or 600 and or 800°C with a retention period of 2 h. The properties like change in colour and percentage weight loss were evaluated. Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity test was used to obtain qualitative information of strength variation. Residual strength of thermally deteriorated concrete specimen was measured by destructive testing.

Findings

Steel fibre volume fraction of 1 per cent improves the compressive strength of concrete in the temperature range of 400 to 800°C. The addition of steel fibre and PP fibre (Mix 3) improves the splitting strength of the concrete at elevated temperature range of 400 to 600°C.

Originality/value

Performance enhancement is observed with hybrid fibres for temperature endurance of concrete.

Details

Journal of Structural Fire Engineering, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-2317

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