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Article

Cam Scholey

To demonstrate a step‐by‐step model of strategy mapping for improving strategy communication in today's organization. The work is based on experience gained while

Abstract

Purpose

To demonstrate a step‐by‐step model of strategy mapping for improving strategy communication in today's organization. The work is based on experience gained while consulting in a myriad of organizations adopting strategy mapping as a strategic initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

Over the past few years since strategy mapping was introduced in literature, the author found that clients in the organizations with which they consulted were often struggling with how to go about implementing a strategy mapping initiative. It became clear that what was needed what a systematic, step‐by‐step framework that was easy to understand and follow. The author developed and refined a six‐step strategymapping framework, which has proven both efficient and effective in practice.

Findings

The recent literature in the area of strategy mapping has proven very useful in terms of explaining what strategy maps are, and why organizations should adopt. The author demonstrates a proven strategymapping model and provides a context through which it can be understood and successfully applied (i.e. how to implement strategy mapping). Validation of the framework is anecdotal and strongly suggests that the framework is both efficient and effective in applying strategy maps in organizations.

Practical implications

The six‐step strategymapping model provides a clear and dynamic blueprint for all people wanting to implement this very useful tool for communicating strategy. The case study provided in the article provides a clear, hands‐on example that will encourage organizations to undertake their own strategy mapping initiative.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills a need for a sound, step‐by‐step, real‐world, grounded guide for implementing a strategy map in any organization.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article

Hezun Li, Na An and Junyong Liu

This paper aims to explore the relationship between the components of the management control system (MCS) based on the reform process of the management system of China…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationship between the components of the management control system (MCS) based on the reform process of the management system of China Resources Group and the influence of these components on the implementation effect of MCS.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an exploratory research method and an open-ended grounded theory approach to conduct six formal investigations and several in-depth interviews with employees and senior management in China Resources Group. This paper supplements these data by performing a documentary analysis of the internal documents of China Resources Group such as the statistical yearbook, business plan and meeting records.

Findings

This study puts forward four propositions. The formal strategic planning process creates an application environment for the strategy map and balanced scorecard (BSC), making it easier for an enterprise to adopt these tools. The combination of the strategy map and formal strategic planning helps to build the logical relationship between strategic goals and budget goals and strengthens the correlation between budget and strategy. In diversified organizations applying MCS, the strategy map and BSC facilitate the implementation of the strategy for specialized business units, while the financial measure system facilitates the implementation of the strategy for diversified business units. Strategic boundaries based on financial measures in the MCS help organizations determine the scope of strategic choices before implementing strategies.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may lack generalizability and the influence of the strategic planning process on budget participation, budget slack and other budget behaviors has not been fully discussed. Therefore, future studies are expected to provide more evidence regarding strategic planning and budget behaviors.

Practical implications

Before establishing a strategy map and BSC, the enterprise should consider the application environment to ensure their feasibility and legitimacy and construct the BSC system under appropriate conditions. A formal strategic planning process should be formed within the enterprise; that is, a set of detailed management methods should be adopted and clear rules should be used to support the enterprise management control process. The enterprise should add strategic boundaries to the MCS to determine the scope of strategic choices and the budgeting bottom line.

Originality/value

This paper sheds light on the impact of the formal strategic planning process on the organization and contributes new evidence on the key success factors for implementing the strategy map and BSC, enriching the researchers’ understanding of the applicability of the BSC.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

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Article

Kristy de Salas and Craig Huxley

Developing an organisational, business, or corporate strategy is an important process which sets the direction and the scope for the business, over a period of time. While…

Abstract

Purpose

Developing an organisational, business, or corporate strategy is an important process which sets the direction and the scope for the business, over a period of time. While any organisation can create their own strategy, not all strategies are well executed and lead to business success. What is required is a process that provides a holistic understanding of an organisational strategy, and clear links between the elements of the strategy and the organisational processes that will be central to its execution. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes three case studies of medium-sized organisations that were the research context in which the methodology for developing and representing Strategy-to-Process Maps was developed and iteratively refined.

Findings

Each of these three case organisations had identified a need to better understand their strategic objectives by a stronger visual representation of the components of their strategy, as well as a need to identify how their daily operational tasks contributed to, or distracted from, the achievement of their strategic goals. These cases assisted in the creation of a method of both facilitating better understanding of strategy through visualisation, and better execution through linking strategy to process. This methodology resulted in the employees of these organisations gaining a much stronger understanding of the strategic directions of the organisation and improved the three elements of effective strategy execution: visibility; leverage and responsiveness.

Originality/value

Strategy-to-Process Maps provide a new way in which organisations can communicate without reliance on any specific strategy development methodology; and can execute their strategy more effectively by linking it closely with organisational processes.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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Article

Syrus Islam

The purpose of this study is to synthesise the prior literature on strategy maps to develop a practitioner’s guide to the design of strategy map frameworks. Robert Kaplan…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to synthesise the prior literature on strategy maps to develop a practitioner’s guide to the design of strategy map frameworks. Robert Kaplan and David Norton introduced the strategy map in their 2000 Harvard Business review article. A strategy map visually represents how the critical elements of an organisation’s strategies are linked together. In an organisation’s strategy execution process, a strategy map complements a performance measurement framework such as the balanced scorecard.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a technical paper, which primarily builds on the prior literature on the strategy map design. In particular, this study reviews 41 publications on strategy maps in the period 2000-2015, including observation of 333 strategy map frameworks.

Findings

This study develops 14 design principles across seven features of a strategy map framework. This study also identifies a significant lack of empirical research on strategy map design features and principles.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could examine whether and why various design features and principles could exert different or same effects (e.g. decision-relevance).

Practical implications

The developed design features and principles can be used by practitioners as guidance for developing customised strategy maps for their organisations.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by serving as a “one-stop shop” for both practitioners and researchers seeking a comprehensive understanding of the current state of the strategy map design features and principles.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

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Article

Nopadol Rompho

The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of a strategy map on the quality of decision making.

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of a strategy map on the quality of decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design is used in this study. A total of 24 participants were randomly assigned into two groups – a control group and a treatment group. Each participant completed two rounds of the experiment covering 24 decisions using a simulation game. The multiple regression technique is used as the analysis tool in this study.

Findings

The results show that strategy maps do not affect the performance of participants' decision making.

Research limitations/implications

This research employs the laboratory experimental design. Thus the external validity (the generalizability) is limited.

Practical implications

Results obtained from this research suggest that a strategy map alone is not an effective tool to help managers make better decisions. More details, such as a correlation between strategic measures in the strategy map or guidelines for the use of the map, could help make a strategy map more useful.

Originality/value

This study tests the cause and effect relationship between using a strategy map and the results of decisions made. Unlike many studies that employ the survey method in which confounding variables cannot be controlled, results from this experiment suggest that a simple strategy map alone does not improve the quality of decision making. This finding can thus be valuable to managers who are considering using a strategy map as a management tool.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

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Article

Ryan Armstrong

The strategy map represents a major contribution to the theory and practice of performance management. However, it has failed to realize its full potential due to a lack…

Abstract

Purpose

The strategy map represents a major contribution to the theory and practice of performance management. However, it has failed to realize its full potential due to a lack of theoretical and conceptual development. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to revisit the theories of strategy maps to better understand how and in what circumstances they benefit performance management.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs realist synthesis, a method of systematic literature review. A theory on how strategy maps work is extracted from performance management literature, which are subsequently evaluated through a critical examination of empirical studies.

Findings

A theory of how strategy maps are meant work is presented in relation to the generic performance management stages of problem structuring, development and use, where they can serve as a tool for discovery and by stimulating social interactions. Based on the findings, 12 propositions are offered related to the effective use of strategy maps within a performance management framework.

Research limitations/implications

The introduction of the strategy map to performance management represented a breakthrough in how organizational performance could be understood and communicated. This study goes a step further by considering how they work and in what circumstances. In so doing, the study aims to open the way for new and more effective applications of strategy maps within the changing performance management context.

Practical implications

This study provides practitioners with actionable propositions which can help in effectively using strategy maps.

Originality/value

Distinguishing the aims and mechanisms of the strategy map along performance management systems has the potential to greatly increase their effectiveness in practice as a powerful, but underutilized tool. This paper also demonstrates how realist synthesis, currently an uncommon method in management studies, facilitated the creation of a new perspective of strategy maps to fit specifically within performance management.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 68 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Mapping a Winning Strategy: Developing and Executing a Successful Strategy in Turbulent Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-129-8

Abstract

Details

Mapping a Winning Strategy: Developing and Executing a Successful Strategy in Turbulent Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-129-8

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Article

Héctor López-Ospina, Luis E. Quezada, Ricardo A. Barros-Castro, Miguel A. Gonzalez and Pedro I. Palominos

The purpose of this paper is to propose a quantitative methodology for the identification of the causal relationships between strategic objectives in a strategy map of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a quantitative methodology for the identification of the causal relationships between strategic objectives in a strategy map of a balanced scorecard. This is done to face the possible weaknesses described in the literature regarding the causal links and the difficulty in validating the relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed method combines the multi-criteria decision-making method called decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) and an optimization model. DEMATEL is used to establish the importance of the strategic relations between strategic objectives, and the optimization model is used to find the relations that are more “important” and should be included in the strategy map. The method was created by reviewing the existing literature, modeling the problem, and applying it in a company.

Findings

The most important results of applying this methodological design include that the proposed method maintains the BSC classical structure; it also enables the generation of several alternatives to support the decision-making process in terms of strategic objectives for a better organizational performance.

Practical implications

The method facilitates the decision-making process by presenting several alternatives of strategy maps according to different levels of organizational criteria. In fact, these alternatives help the organization in focusing on the most important aspects of the strategy map. Consequently, managers may identify where to pay more attention and resources in order to achieve the most important objectives of the company. Hence, this method, as a support for decision makers, enables (and requires) the active participation of senior managers and any kind of decision makers in creating and valuating objectives, relations, constraints, importance, and parameters of the optimization model.

Originality/value

DEMATEL has been used to design strategy maps. The contribution of the paper is the use of a linear programming model to select those relationships that should be included in the strategy map. It allows manager to focus on those strategic elements that are important from a strategic point of view. The application in a company showed that the contribution is not only theoretical but practical as well.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article

Guoliang Yang, Alasdair Macnab, Liying Yang and Chunliang Fan

This paper aims to help research managers design the performance management process and select measures and indicators, which relate to the strategies of their…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to help research managers design the performance management process and select measures and indicators, which relate to the strategies of their organisations directly.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, we will propose strategy maps for national research institutes (NRIs), so that the managers can describe the strategies of their organisations more clearly, accurately and logically. Also, we will propose a new method to set targets for key performance indicators (KPIs), which is named “Forecasting-Objective Achievement System (FOAS)”.

Findings

The authors have explored the general rules of the research activity and proposed the strategic map for NRIs, so that the research managers can more clearly, accurately and logically describe the strategy for the organisational development strategy, and build the performance measurement indicators based on it. It allows the managers to transfer the strategy into clear and concrete action initiatives, and the corresponding performance evaluation indicators. Also, this paper proposed a new method for target-setting for performance indicator to drive NRIs do their best to achieve high performance.

Research limitations/implications

First, this paper proposes a framework of strategy maps for NRIs to transfer the strategy into clear and concrete action initiatives, and the corresponding performance evaluation indicators. Also, this paper gives a case study of a research institute in the field of physics to derive KPIs based on its strategy maps, which can show the effectiveness of this approach. But this institute conducts mainly the basic research, and there are other NRIs with different types of research, such as applied research, which have different characteristics with the NRI in the case study.

Originality/value

The authors propose the specific strategy maps for NRIs and a new method to set targets for KPIs. Further, the example of a national research institute is taken to analyze its strategy map and construct a performance measurement indicator system for it, so that the strategies in research management can be transferred to specific action initiatives. New ideas are provided for the performance measurement of national research institutes.

Details

Journal of Science & Technology Policy Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

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