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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Azaddin Salem Khalifa

The purpose of this paper is to show how to construct a strategy canvas for a business school based on students' perceptions of the importance of critical value dimensions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how to construct a strategy canvas for a business school based on students' perceptions of the importance of critical value dimensions of its undergraduate offering(s) and its comparable performance on each. This can be used in evaluating the school's extant strategy and in developing a new innovative one.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research is used to solicit and measure students' perception. This is then subjected to proper statistical analysis to draw conclusions, which are then used to construct the strategy canvas.

Findings

The findings show the strengths and weaknesses of the school's current strategy profile. They suggest how to use resources to improve performance on critical value dimensions and trigger thinking on new innovative dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the focus on one constituent (students) of the business school, and the choice and size of the sample.

Practical implications

The use of students' perception to construct a strategy canvas proved to be useful and revealing. It shows how the strategy profiles of competitors compare and where to look for further information. This process helps create, evaluate, and develop new strategic insights.

Originality/value

The paper endeavors to use the rigor of survey analysis to provide valid and reliable information on the basis of which to construct a strategy canvas. This, perhaps, represents the first attempt to bring this combination to the context of higher education management.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Nuraeni Kadir

This paper aims to investigate the entrepreneurship perception and business developmental strategy of silk business in Wajo Regency, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the entrepreneurship perception and business developmental strategy of silk business in Wajo Regency, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study subject was the silk industry located in Wajo Regency, South Sulawesi Province. The study population was 544 silk weavers running the business of silk weaving. The study sample consisted of 235 respondents. To prove the hypothesis stated by the author, the canvas business model analysis method was used to identify entrepreneurship perception, and SWOT (strength, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was conducted to understand the potential of the strategy of weaving business development in Wajo Regency, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia.

Findings

Business model canvas (BMC) is a complex business model that becomes simple through a canvas approach, drawing a sheet of the canvas containing a map of nine elements (box), allowing businessmen to identify the business potential. The nine elements of the canvas that should be understood and considered for running a business are customer segment, value proportion, channel, customer relationship, revenue steam, key resource, key activities, key partnership and cost structure. To improve farmers’ entrepreneurship perception, it would be nice for the weavers who run the silk business should constantly consider the nine elements of BMCso that in running their businesses, they can understand different considerations and create a progressive and developing silk industry.

Originality/value

This research is about merger two concept of business development in entrepreneurship to increase revenues, with the location of study as originality (no previous research for this relationship): Auditor in Wajo regency South Sulawesi Province in Indonesia. Based on the background stated above, this study aims to analyze entrepreneurship perception and silk industry developmental strategy in Wajo Regency, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 60 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Stan Abraham

This masterclass aims to consider a number of recent business articles and books that can help practitioners clarify the distinction between the strategy development and

Abstract

Purpose

This masterclass aims to consider a number of recent business articles and books that can help practitioners clarify the distinction between the strategy development and business model approaches and decide which is appropriate for their situation.

Design/methodology/approach

The article defines the difference between the two approaches this way: business models explain who your customers are and how you plan to make money by providing them with value; strategy identifies how you will beat competitors by being different.

Findings

The paper reveals that a business model approach has limitations. It will not help an organization develop a competitive advantage, outperform its competition, acquire or merge with another organization, or diversify. However, corporate strategy does not identify how to deliver unique value to meet customers' needs.

Practical implications

The main reason why organizations fail at business‐model innovation is too much “tweaking” – incremental attempts at improvement in myriad projects when more radical change to its business model is the answer.

Originality/value

The article proposes that businesses need both strategy development and business model innovation to adapt and thrive as conditions change.

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Case study
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Amarpreet Singh Ghura and Ishwar Kumar

Through a discussion of the case, students will be able to conduct “Pros and Cons” analysis for entering a new market. Conduct “SWOT” analysis for entering a new market…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Through a discussion of the case, students will be able to conduct “Pros and Cons” analysis for entering a new market. Conduct “SWOT” analysis for entering a new market. Explain how to create a Blue Ocean Market Space, by implementing the concept of value-innovation. Demonstrate the role of “strategy canvas” and “The four action framework” in creating Blue Ocean Market Space.

Case overview/synopsis

This case describes a situation in which Vivek Vyas (Vyas) and Vimal Popat (Popat) first generation entrepreneurs starts their venture shradhanajali.com in June 2011. The monthly revenues range in between INR 75,000 and INR 80,000. Shradhanjali.com has garnered customers from major parts of India, USA, Canada, UK and Africa. It was in 2019 when Vyas and Popat co-founders of Shradhanjali.com were in their office at Rajkot, Gujarat reading an article in financial express, which had a mention of India’s 10 most wacky startups which used technology and internet to get closer to users. One of the startups reported by financial express was offering people to book cremation for the funeral of the deceased loved ones. Looking at the article Popat thought to enter a new market space by mid of 2020, where new offering to customers to book online pujas across temples in India on the birth and death anniversaries of their loved ones. The purpose of this case is to provide an opportunity for the participants to make use of management tools such as Pros and Cons; and SWOT analysis to decide whether shradhanjali.com should penetrate more into this world of e-commerce and offer online puja service to their customers. However, the two co-founders are undecided whether to add online puja service in their service portfolio as they do now know the way forward to convert the idea of online puja into a viable business? Participants need to take into consideration the data given for shradhajali.com and make assumptions and resolve the dilemma through which Vyas and Popat are going through.

Complexity academic level

The case involves various issues with first generation online startup in strategic management field such “Pros and Cons” analysis and challenges faced during the new market creation phase. Thus, this case can be used for covering multiple perspectives related to blue ocean strategy (e.g. application of strategy canvas and the four action framework).

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Svend Hollensen

The purpose with this article is to analyze the “Blue Ocean” phenomenon in depth. The goal is to better understand the underlying dynamic strategies in the form of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose with this article is to analyze the “Blue Ocean” phenomenon in depth. The goal is to better understand the underlying dynamic strategies in the form of interactions between theory and management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Single case study, Nintendo, which strategy is being confronted with the strategies of the two competitors, Sony and Microsoft. This is done in order to distinguish the value propositions of the three players in the game console industry

Findings

The main finding is that even if a company can create a Blue Ocean very fast with the right value proposition at the right time, it may be short-termed and may be transformed into a Red Ocean again within 1-2 years, unless the company's competitiveness is safe-guarded.

Practical implications

The results show, that Nintendo started out with a Red Ocean around 2005 with their GameCube. Then they turned it into a Blue Ocean with their introduction of “Wii” in November 2006. But Nintendo could not prevent Sony and Microsoft in turning it back to a Red Ocean, with their introduction of similar product features (motion controls), but at better quality. If Nintendo will be able to reestablish the Blue Ocean with their introduction of the “Wii U” in November 2012 is questionable.

Originality/value

There is constantly a need for reformulating the strategy through a dynamic and creative process, in order not to turn the Blue Ocean into a Red Ocean again.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Case study
Publication date: 21 August 2021

Christopher Curtis Winchester, Erin Pleggenkuhle-Miles and Andrea Erin Bass

The theoretical basis for this case is a focus on vertical integration, first-mover advantage and competitive dynamics. Vertical integration is based on Williamson’s…

Abstract

Theoretical basis

The theoretical basis for this case is a focus on vertical integration, first-mover advantage and competitive dynamics. Vertical integration is based on Williamson’s (1979) theory of transaction-cost economics as it relates to vertical integration; the discussion on first-mover advantage is built off of Suarez and Lanzolla’s (2005) dynamics of first-mover advantage; and the analyzes on competitive dynamics derives from the MacMillan et al. (1985) early empirical tests of interfirm rivalry dynamics.

Research methodology

The authors conducted extensive research using the following sources: IBISWorld, MergentOnline and academic journals, trade magazines and websites. Additionally, the authors successfully piloted the case on more than 350 undergraduate students enrolled in a business and corporate strategy course.

Case overview/synopsis

Peloton used vertical integration to control the creation of its own software, bikes, exercise classes and retail outlets. In doing so, Peloton was one of the first companies in the industry to have near full control of the production process (Gross and Caisman, 2019). Due to this integration, Peloton was one of the fitness equipment industry leaders. However, Peloton’s high level of vertical integration coupled with rapid growth led to lackluster profitability. Given the rise in popularity of in-home exercise equipment, Peloton had room to continue its growth, but the question remained whether it was strategically positioned to do so.

Complexity academic level

This case is best taught in undergraduate and graduate strategy courses. For undergraduate courses, it could be incorporated into lessons on competitive dynamics, internal analysis and first-mover advantage and strategic positioning. For graduate courses, it could be incorporated into lessons on vertical integration and delving more in-depth into the long-term sustainability of having a first-mover advantage.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Som Sekhar Bhattacharyya and Aakash Malik

The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive understanding regarding corporate turnaround. An integrated discussion regarding different corporate failure…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive understanding regarding corporate turnaround. An integrated discussion regarding different corporate failure factors, conditions, symptoms followed by turnaround strategies and its results have been provided.

Design/methodology/approach

Authors have done a comprehensive systematic and integrated literature review study of research articles on corporate turnaround. The paper reviewed discussed different dimensions of turnaround management. The authors applied thematic reductionist categorisation with logical arguments to develop an integrated turnaround canvas (ICT).

Findings

An ICT has been developed. ICT is a holistic framework to comprehend turnaround strategy. Impact of precondition and turnaround levers on cash flow dynamics and the operational and strategic levers for successful turnaround performance of the firm has also been presented. Authors have also tabulated the entire spectrum of corporate turnaround.

Research limitations/implications

This conceptual work would help researchers interested in turnaround research to anchor their study at different points in ICT canvas. This could be at the decline precondition stage, corporate failure state, turnaround levers (strategic and operational) application phase and in terms of turnaround performance.

Practical implications

The ICT canvas would help managers to identify the set of corporate failure preconditions which might lead their firm to decline phase. The ICT canvas would also help managers based upon the identification of decline preconditions to select an appropriate turnaround interventions required to arrest the corporate failure. Finally, the ICT canvas would help in identifying the operational and strategic levers for successful turnaround implementation and thus achieving the desired corporate performance.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to provide an integrated perspective on corporate turnaround as the developed ICT canvas consisted of identification of decline preconditions, corporate failure, turnaround levers (strategic and operational ) and turnaround performance.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Brian Leavy

To study blue ocean strategy (value innovation management), which not only reframes the strategic challenge – from competing to making the competition irrelevant – but

Abstract

Purpose

To study blue ocean strategy (value innovation management), which not only reframes the strategic challenge – from competing to making the competition irrelevant – but also provides a series of tools and frameworks to act on this insight in a way that maximizes the opportunity and minimizes the risk.

Design/methodology/approach

This interview with Professors W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne considers the concept of value innovation management and examines the ideas and tools they developed in their book Blue Ocean Strategy (Harvard Business School Press, 2005), the product of a successful twenty‐year research and consultancy partnership.

Findings

Blue ocean strategy is applicable across all types of industries from typical consumer product goods to b2b. It offers an alternative approach to the existing strategic planning process, one that is based not on preparing a spreadsheet document but on drawing a strategy canvas.

Research limitations/implications

The interview gives professors Kim and Mauborgne an opportunity to summarize many of their recent research findings.

Practical implications

As blue ocean strategy represents a significant departure from the status quo, managers typically face four hurdles to execution: first, cognitive: waking employees up to the need for a strategic shift; second, limited resources: the greater the shift in strategy, the greater the resources needed to execute it; third, motivation: inspire key players to move fast and tenaciously to carry out a break from the status quo; and fourth, organizational politics. Leaders must identify and effectively deal with internal opponents to change.

Originality/value

Provides a unique overview of value innovation management, its principles, tools, and techniques.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Priyadarshini Das, Srinath Perera, Sepani Senaratne and Robert Osei-Kyei

Industry 4.0 is driving an incremental shift in paradigms for the construction industry. Current research in the built environment is limited to exploring the exponential…

Abstract

Purpose

Industry 4.0 is driving an incremental shift in paradigms for the construction industry. Current research in the built environment is limited to exploring the exponential technological prowess of Industry 4.0 with very little work on its implications to the construction business model, strategy and competitive advantage. There arises a challenge for researchers to understand how appropriate technologies can be assembled to assist in achieving the goals of construction businesses. The overarching aim of this research is to develop a construction Business Model Transformation Canvas (BMTC) to map the transformation of construction enterprises in Industry 4.0.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was carried out by conducting an expert forum with academics from nine universities across Australia and New Zealand. The study employed purposive sampling, and the academics were selected in a strategic manner in order to provide data that are relevant to the research.

Findings

The research identifies that technology-based partnerships supporting strategy and capability building, platforms enabling enterprises to conceive, design, manufacture and assemble buildings and competition with stakeholders having superior capabilities not in building but in other areas of business are fundamental to Industry 4.0 transformation.

Originality/value

The results present state-of-the-art development of business model research in construction that intends to support the strategic planning of construction enterprises in Industry 4.0. This research is the first and only research that uses a business model canvas (BMC) for strategy-reformulation in incumbent construction enterprises to maintain a competitive advantage in Industry 4.0. Merits of the construction BMTC lie in its holistic approach, visual representation and simplicity.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 1 September 2021

Heidi M.J. Bertels and David Desplaces

The case integrates frameworks on business models, the business model canvas (BMC) and Porter’s generic strategies in the context of the coffee industry in China. The case…

Abstract

Theoretical basis

The case integrates frameworks on business models, the business model canvas (BMC) and Porter’s generic strategies in the context of the coffee industry in China. The case enables students to construct a Business Model Canvas for competing companies, analyze the canvas to deduce the generic strategy they are pursuing, and formulate recommendations based on this analysis.

Research methodology

The case is derived from secondary sources, including publicly available reports and information about Starbucks and Luckin.

Case overview/synopsis

This case looks at Starbucks in China as it faces a fierce Chinese competitor and evolving consumer behavior. Luckin, a Chinese coffee store company, had seen explosive growth since its inception in Beijing in 2017. By late 2019, its number of brick-and-mortar locations surpassed the number of Starbucks’ coffee stores in China, which had entered the Chinese market two decades earlier in 1999. Luckin’s focused on convenience through leveraging technology and reducing costs by limiting physical stores. Although Luckin’s fortunes turned in March of 2020, after an accounting scandal came to light, Luckin’s success suggests that consumers were attracted to its positioning as a “fast coffee pickup and delivery” provider. The case describes Starbucks’ strategy in China, which it sees as an important long-term growth market. It also describes the strategic activities of fast-growing, Chinese coffee company Luckin and discusses Chinese culture and consumer behavior.

Complexity academic level

The case is written for undergraduate students enrolled in a business strategy or corporate entrepreneurship course. Given that the case centers on China, it could also be used in international entrepreneurship/business courses.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

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