Search results

1 – 10 of over 9000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Arun Kumar Jain and Ajay Kumar Singal

This paper aims to look at corporate vulnerability – a concept unexplored in literature. It analyzes how firms develop vulnerability as a result of past strategic

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to look at corporate vulnerability – a concept unexplored in literature. It analyzes how firms develop vulnerability as a result of past strategic decisions and business practices like global sourcing, outsourcing, business models, manufacturing practices, diversification, etc.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper relies on cross-disciplinary theories from natural hazard management and strategy literature to put forth a definition of strategic vulnerability and its dimensions.

Findings

Strategic vulnerability is seen as a multidimensional construct having at least three attributes: Tangible resources that capture the physical assets dimension; Capabilities are the skills, learning and knowledge part; and Fitness that represents the collective ability of an organization to cope with external and internal challenges. Further, vulnerabilities remain inherent in the firm, and may not be visible until organizations face some external stress or adverse scenario.

Research limitations/implications

The framework needs further empirical testing through case studies or other methodologies to bring forth managerial reflections on the three dimensions identified in the paper.

Originality/value

Strategic vulnerability framework helps managers to analyze the dimensions that make strategic position of firms vulnerable to existing or emerging competition. Based on the vulnerability analysis, managers can initiate actions to improve competitive positioning of their firms.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Randy Borum, John Felker, Sean Kern, Kristen Dennesen and Tonya Feyes

This paper aims to highlight the importance and role of strategic cyber intelligence to support risk-informed decision-making, ultimately leading to improved objectives…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the importance and role of strategic cyber intelligence to support risk-informed decision-making, ultimately leading to improved objectives, policies, architectures and investments to advance a nation or organization’s interests in the cyber domain.

Design/methodology/approach

Integration of professional research literature from the fields of intelligence studies, strategy and information/computer security.

Findings

Investing in technology, firewalls and intrusion detection systems is appropriate but, by itself, insufficient. Intelligence is a key component. Cyber intelligence emphasizes prevention and anticipation, to focus cybersecurity efforts before an attack occurs (“left of the hack”). Strategic cyber intelligence can substantially reduce risk to the organization’s mission and valued assets and support its due diligence.

Originality/value

This paper describes how strategic cyber intelligence can be implemented and used within an enterprise to enhance its cyber defense, and create a more proactive and adaptive security posture. It not only describes strategic cyber intelligence as a distinct discipline, but also demonstrates how the key intelligence functions articulate with existing cybersecurity risk management standards.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Nurul Afroze Zainal Abidin and Bingunath Ingirige

The dynamics and effects of interconnected risks among construction organisations tend to be overlooked across the Malaysian public project supply chains, making them…

Abstract

Purpose

The dynamics and effects of interconnected risks among construction organisations tend to be overlooked across the Malaysian public project supply chains, making them highly vulnerable to supply chain disruptions. This study aims to investigate this dynamism by assessing the supply chain’s critical vulnerabilities and capabilities that formulate the level of resilience in handling disruptive events in construction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive questionnaire survey was conducted with 105 construction professionals from two groups of respondents, the public and private organisations that work in public projects to identify their current vulnerabilities and capabilities. Data were analysed and compared using the Mann–Whitney U and Kruskal–Wallis tests.

Findings

The findings revealed that the top five critical vulnerability factors of the supply chain include political or regulatory changes, market pressures, management, financial and strategic vulnerability. Further comparisons highlighted that the public organisations faced significantly higher political threats compared to the private organisations whilst the private organisations faced significant market pressures. The survey also shows that despite the private organisations’ high capability in financial strength, the public organisations’ financial vulnerability has destabilised the entire supply chain.

Originality/value

This study presents the construction supply chain’s vulnerabilities in a layered framework approach that can provide managers a new perspective on the dynamics of the cascading impacts of these vulnerabilities when observed through several layers of supply chains.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Mauricio F. Blos, Mohammed Quaddus, H.M. Wee and Kenji Watanabe

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to identify the supply chain risks in the automotive and electronic industries in Brazil, and to highlight the urgency of supply…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to identify the supply chain risks in the automotive and electronic industries in Brazil, and to highlight the urgency of supply chain risk management (SCRM) implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

It uses exploratory study methodology in the automotive and electronic industries, taking in consideration of the (SCRM) phase of initiation.

Findings

There are significant practices to implement SCRM: better supply chain communication, SCRM and business continuity planning training program, and the creation of a chief risk officer position to manage the supply chain risks.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this study comes from its small sample size. There are two simple reasons: many companies did not know SCRM and thus misinterpreted the information about SCRM.

Practical implications

This case study promotes more preparedness for the two industries to manage the risks of supply chain.

Originality/value

This study shows the risks that surround the supply chain in the automotive and electronic industries in Brazil and how these industries can implement SCRM in a successful way.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Charles C. Nielson

The concept of switching costs or transaction‐specific investments has been widely used in theoretical models of industrial buyer‐seller relationships. Yet there are few…

Abstract

The concept of switching costs or transaction‐specific investments has been widely used in theoretical models of industrial buyer‐seller relationships. Yet there are few empirical studies that have examined the dimensionality of switching costs. The purpose of this study is to investigate empirically the dimensions of switching costs. Different typologies, or dimensions, of switching costs are identified from a review of the literature. Measures of these dimensions are developed and empirically tested for construct and pragmatic validity using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling. Two switching cost dimensions are identified and validated: hard assets and soft assets.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Cristina Machado Guimarães and José Crespo de Carvalho

Considering lean thinking inside and beyond the organisation's boundaries, in the extended supply chain, this paper aims to fill a literature gap clearly stating some…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering lean thinking inside and beyond the organisation's boundaries, in the extended supply chain, this paper aims to fill a literature gap clearly stating some outsourcing practices as lean practices and establishing a deployment evolution parallel between both practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was carried out collecting cases of lean deployment in healthcare, from both scientific and grey literature. Cases were classified according to lean deployment taxonomy in healthcare settings, showing some differences in lean journey stages in 15 countries.

Findings

There is an alignment between SCM thinking in healthcare and lean thinking that places a SCM decision as outsourcing as a lean practice serving not only strategic intent but solving operational efficiency. There is a match between different outsourcing drivers (transactional, strategic and transformational) and lean maturity levels. The main constraint to deployment of both lean and outsourcing practices are cultural differences.

Practical implications

Understanding lean and outsourcing different deployment maturity levels under the national cultural umbrella can open new perspectives to study lean sustainability factors and better outsourcing relationships in healthcare organisations.

Originality/value

This paper presents a merger between the state‐of‐the art of both lean and outsourcing practices in healthcare settings and suggests an outsourcing and lean evolving pathway.

Details

Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8297

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Hamidreza Panjehfouladgaran and Stanley Frederick W.T. Lim

Reverse logistics (RL), an inseparable aspect of supply chain management, returns used products to recovery processes with the aim of reducing waste generation…

Abstract

Purpose

Reverse logistics (RL), an inseparable aspect of supply chain management, returns used products to recovery processes with the aim of reducing waste generation. Enterprises, however, seem reluctant to apply RL due to various types of risks which are perceived as posing an economic threat to businesses. This paper draws on a synthesis of supply chain and risk management literature to identify and cluster RL risk factors and to recommend risk mitigation strategies for reducing the negative impact of risks on RL implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors identify and cluster risk factors in RL by using risk management theory. Experts in RL and supply chain risk management validated the risk factors via a questionnaire. An unsupervised data mining method, self-organising map, is utilised to cluster RL risk factors into homogeneous categories.

Findings

A total of 41 risk factors in the context of RL were identified and clustered into three different groups: strategic, tactical and operational. Risk mitigation strategies are recommended to mitigate the RL risk factors by drawing on supply chain risk management approaches.

Originality/value

This paper studies risks in RL and recommends risk management strategies to control and mitigate risk factors to implement RL successfully.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article

Abdullah Al Mamun, Rajennd A/L Muniady, Mohd Asrul Hery Bin Ibrahim and Noorshella Binti Che Nawi

This study aims to investigate the impact of economic vulnerability upon entrepreneurial competencies (i.e. commitment competency, conceptual competency, opportunity…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of economic vulnerability upon entrepreneurial competencies (i.e. commitment competency, conceptual competency, opportunity recognition competency, organizing competency, relationship competency and strategic competency) among respondents from varied development initiatives established by the eKasih program (National Poverty Data Bank) in Peninsular Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Upon adopting the cross-sectional design, data were randomly gathered from selected 300 micro-entrepreneurs from the list of development organizations available in the eKasih (National Poverty Data Bank), located at four states in Peninsular Malaysia. The quantitative data were gathered by performing structured interview sessions from September until November 2017.

Findings

The outcomes of the study displayed that economic vulnerability has a significantly negative effect upon commitment, opportunity recognition, organizing and strategic competency. On the other hand, the results showcased that economi c vulnerability has a significantly positive effect on competency, but insignificantly positive impact upon conceptual competency.

Originality/value

These study outcomes appear to extend the scope of the resource-based view, apart from enriching the existing entrepreneurial competency literature, particularly within the Malaysian context. Hence, it is recommended that the government of Malaysia and development organizations should focus on maximizing the level of competency among micro-entrepreneurs as a viable approach to decrease the effect of economic vulnerability.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-7812

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Bui Tue Quynh and Rudy Martens

The vulnerability of capabilities – their susceptibility to depreciation of their strategic value – results from an unbalance between exploitation and exploration within a…

Abstract

The vulnerability of capabilities – their susceptibility to depreciation of their strategic value – results from an unbalance between exploitation and exploration within a capability as well as between different levels of capabilities. This vulnerability is examined under the lens of bounded awareness in which the issues of timing, success, and beliefs affect the bias in the deployment of capabilities. Different levels of capabilities are prone to become vulnerable because of internal and external forces. Interfirm knowledge transfer is suggested as a way to reduce the vulnerability of capabilities.

Details

Advances in Applied Business Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-520-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Spencer Chainey and John Chapman

The strategic intelligence assessment (SIA) plays an important role in contemporary intelligence‐led policing by helping to identify strategic priorities for policing…

Abstract

Purpose

The strategic intelligence assessment (SIA) plays an important role in contemporary intelligence‐led policing by helping to identify strategic priorities for policing activity, crime reduction and improvements in community safety. Originally defined in the UK's National Intelligence Model, the SIA is produced annually by all local UK police districts as well as other agencies in the UK and internationally that have adopted intelligence‐led principles. The purpose of this paper is to critique the two most common approaches to its production, structuring its content following a “crime‐type” template or an assessment that is based on previous strategic priorities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper's critique is based on reviewing one hundred SIAs from police forces and Community Safety Partnerships in the UK and through speaking to practitioners on their experiences in using these intelligence products to determine strategic priorities.

Findings

The paper identifies weaknesses in both, arguing that neither tends to generate strategic intelligence products that are fit for the purpose for effective decision making, and in particular in helping to harness support from local government partners to address persistent and causal factors. As an alternative the study introduce a problem‐oriented approach to the production of strategic intelligence, with an assessment made in relation to place (locations and temporal features), offending and offender management, and victimisation and vulnerability.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that the problem‐oriented approach leads to the production of a SIA that is more cross‐cutting in its analysis of crime and community safety issues, and more naturally leads to the identification of strategic priorities that focus on addressing causal issues.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 9000