Search results

1 – 10 of over 45000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Roberto Sarmiento, Graeme Knowles and Mike Byrne

The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical analysis of studies on strategic consensus along manufacturing competitive priorities. Based on this analysis, a new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical analysis of studies on strategic consensus along manufacturing competitive priorities. Based on this analysis, a new methodology to measure strategic consensus on manufacturing competitive priorities that is more consistent with mainstream operations management theory is proposed. The paper also includes novel proposals for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The new methodology and proposals for research are mainly based on a literature review of previous studies on strategic consensus regarding manufacturing competitive priorities and also on relevant research and works in the field of operations management.

Findings

Previous methodologies used to measure strategic consensus regarding manufacturing competitive priorities are mainly based on studies in the business strategy field. Thus, these methodologies are deemed as inadequate in the operations management field. It is also found that there are very few studies that have analysed this topic in the operations management field. Moreover, since the methodologies used in those studies are based on previous research in the field of business strategy, the results of the reviewed papers are considered as questionable.

Practical implications

For academics, the paper and its results imply a change in the methodologies and research used to study the issue of strategic consensus on manufacturing competitive priorities. The lack of research into this topic is also observed. More research and studies on this theme are needed. For practitioners, the methodology proposed in the paper could be utilised in order to assess the employees' knowledge of the relationships between manufacturing capabilities inside manufacturing firms.

Originality/value

To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first review paper into this under‐researched theme in the operations management field. The paper also presents the first methodology that incorporates mainstream theory and research in the field of operations management into the measurement of strategic consensus on manufacturing competitive priorities.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Karynne Turner, Mona Makhija and Cynthia Miree

The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore the relationship between individuals’ shared core knowledge within a firm and a collective understanding of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore the relationship between individuals’ shared core knowledge within a firm and a collective understanding of management’s strategic priorities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study develops three sets of competing hypotheses to predict how three different aspects of individuals’ shared core knowledge – extent, diversity and interpretation – are related to their understanding of the organization’s strategic priorities. The hypotheses are tested using a cognitive mapping approach within the context of a manufacturing plant in the USA.

Findings

Organizational members with a lower proportion of shared core knowledge exhibit a greater appreciation of the firm’s strategic priorities. More diversity in this shared knowledge is associated with a greater appreciation of strategic priorities and when members agree on the relative importance of different types of knowledge, whether they actually share this knowledge, they have a better understanding of the firm’s strategic priorities.

Research limitations/implications

The study uses data from a single firm in one industry.

Originality/value

This research helps to highlight and empirically isolate different aspects of shared knowledge that influence individuals’ understanding of organizational priorities. It also demonstrates the varying importance of different aspects of shared knowledge (e.g. extent, diversity and interpretation in explaining individuals’ understanding of the firm’s strategic priorities.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Loukas K. Tsironis and Panagiotis Petros Matthopoulos

Supply chain (SC) is a homogeneous and interconnected network of firms which manages supplies, storages and handles material, information, personnel, equipment and final…

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain (SC) is a homogeneous and interconnected network of firms which manages supplies, storages and handles material, information, personnel, equipment and final products throughout its length. The SC can be the means by which businesses add value to customers and therefore competitive advantage in the international market. Competitiveness no longer exists among individual members of a SC but between SCs. International literature pointed out, that strategy and competitiveness associated with specific strategic priorities. In this paper will be documented that the priorities as objectives of strategic importance comprise the key areas for the performance of the SC network. To support this, a systematic framework of strategic priorities, will be developed, which will visualize the major SC assessment areas that the SC network should turn its improvement efforts. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 200 high level managers from 71 Greek manufacturing companies covering the whole country using their own SC networks took part in the study. Data analysis were conducted to create a model that describes the strategic priorities which are important, for the competitive advantage of their SC network.

Findings

The results revealed seven critical strategic priorities: internal flexibility, production quality, waste reduction, customer focus, sustainability, reduction of production cost and efficiency. This paper analytically explores the strategic practices that seem to influence SC network performance and generates a systematic framework of the critical strategic priorities of the SC network performance.

Practical implications

The proposed framework has six major advantages. First the research outcome enables managers to design their SC strategy. Second, proved the great importance of the strategic priorities institutionalization. Third, makes clear to stakeholders which are the SC network performance issues to consider. Fourth, the proposed framework could serve as a suitable formula for assessing the effectiveness and readiness of SC to face the competition. Fifth, it is an effective way of prioritizing the strategic practices as it provides the most important areas on which the firm can base tasks like evaluation, benchmarking and comparison of its SC both as a network and as individual firms. Finally, the proposed framework is an effective way to evaluate the consistency of strategic objectives and actions adopted for the SC.

Originality/value

Literature review revealed a very important conclusion. It has been developed a broad discussion concerning issues on strategic practices which are responsible for the competitive advantage of the SC network. However, there has not been a significant effort on integrating all the practices under the spectrum of the SC in order to distinguish the most important of these practices that can lead to competitive advantages.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Borut Rusjan

Proposes a model of strategic planning as a basis to overcome the identified shortcomings in the past empirical research. The basic assumption of the proposed model is…

Abstract

Purpose

Proposes a model of strategic planning as a basis to overcome the identified shortcomings in the past empirical research. The basic assumption of the proposed model is that an appropriate strategic analysis is necessary in order to ensure appropriate strategic decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Shortcomings related to empirical research in the past were identified with the aim of discussing some possible reasons why the concept of manufacturing strategy had not been more widely adopted in practice and of developing the model of strategic planning. Based on the proposed model and relating to previous research, an empirical study of two relationships has been performed: first, between business strategic competence of an enterprise and business performance, and second, between business strategic competence and manufacturing strategic decision areas.

Findings

The goals of analysis in the process of strategic planning have been explained. Empirical findings about a positive relationship between business performance and business strategic competence confirmed the results of previous research. Some empirically significant relationships between strategic decision areas and manufacturing competitive priorities results were identified.

Practical implications

In order to guarantee effective decision making, the role of the analysis in the process of planning has to be understood. This phase of the planning process is not getting enough attention from practitioners. This results in decision making for which quick jumping to solution‐seeking is characteristic, without appropriate determination of problems beforehand.

Originality/value

The paper emphasises the importance of strategic analysis and problem identification to appropriate strategic decision making. This holds true not only of practical strategic decision making inside specific companies, but also of design and implementation of empirical research.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Carmen Aranda and Javier Arellano

The paper aims to explore how managers change their strategic view so that they come with a better understanding of the strategy. It uses two proxies for such…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore how managers change their strategic view so that they come with a better understanding of the strategy. It uses two proxies for such understanding: balance in beliefs (taken from performance measurement system literature) and consensus on strategic priorities (taken from strategic literature).

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal study is conducted in a financial institution during a strategic change communicated through a tailor‐made balanced scorecard (BSC). The changes are measured in the degree of understanding experienced by a set of 45 middle managers in each of the two phases in which the BSC implementation has been divided. The paper tests to what extent as the BSC implementation progresses there is a balancing in users' beliefs, an increase in consensus and alignment of managers' priorities; and finally, whether or not those proxies of managers' understanding are interchangeable.

Findings

Results show that the implementation of this BSC brought about a change in managers' beliefs by increasing the importance given to measures located in the lower BSC perspectives (called balancing effect), as well as an increase in the degree of consensus on strategic priorities. However, in the paper more balance in managers' beliefs were not necessarily associated with a higher degree of consensus and alignment. The two proxies are not interchangeable and the balancing effect was found to be ineffective and insufficient in providing an explanation for the consensus formation process.

Originality/value

The paper provides empirical evidence on how middle managers change their mental models and improve their understanding of the strategy. The paper helps in aligning performance measurement systems literature and strategic literature.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ravi Kathuria, Stephen J. Porth, N.N. Kathuria and T.K. Kohli

The purpose of this paper is to understand the competitive priorities of manufacturers in India, and examine the level of agreement or strategic consensus between senior…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the competitive priorities of manufacturers in India, and examine the level of agreement or strategic consensus between senior executives and manufacturing managers on manufacturing competitive priorities in light of the prevalent culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data collected from 156 respondents from 78 manufacturing units based on a national sample in India are used to test the hypotheses using the paired samples t‐tests and multivariate analysis of variance.

Findings

A relatively high emphasis by both levels of managers on quality, compared to the other three competitive priorities, is noteworthy and consistent with the global trends. The emphasis on delivery is a close second. Differences in competitive priorities exist across managerial levels in India despite the high power distance and low individualism.

Research limitations/implications

The effect of ownership as private or public company was examined and no significant differences found, but data could not be collected on the ownership structure such as wholly owned domestic firms, foreign subsidiaries, or joint ventures. and whether a firm is a supplier to a multinational company. It may also be noted that a majority of the manufacturing companies in this paper came from three industries – chemicals, fabricated metals, and electronic and electrical equipment – and, hence, the findings of the paper might have been unduly influenced by the prevalent practices in these industries.

Practical implications

The paper informs global managers and firms seeking to outsource to, or invest in, India that the Indian managers place significantly high emphasis on quality and delivery, but not as much on product variety or ability to make frequent changes to product design and production volume. The managers in India need to take note of prevailing differences in managerial priorities and efforts need to be made such that the priorities are aligned and manufacturing strategy may be unified and coordinated.

Originality/value

In the Indian context, this is the first study that deployed multiple respondents to understand the manufacturing competitive priorities, and also the first to examine strategic consensus in operations strategy.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Deven Krishnan, Rafikul Islam and Suhaimi Mhd. Sarif

The purpose of this study intends to develop a hierarchical model through prioritisation of the core competencies with respect to competitive advantage, financial and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study intends to develop a hierarchical model through prioritisation of the core competencies with respect to competitive advantage, financial and strategic performance for an oil and gas company in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed method approach used in the present research. Initially, interviews were conducted to solicit information about the company’s core competencies, competitive advantage, and financial and strategic performance. The interview findings used for questionnaire development to rank core competencies with respect to competitive advantage, financial and strategic performance. The survey results were analysed using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP), a mathematical model and is synthesised using Super Decisions Software.

Findings

The study developed a hierarchical model and can be set as a benchmark for prioritising core competencies, with respect to competitive advantage, financial and strategic performance for oil and gas companies.

Practical implications

The prioritisation results will help the company considered in the present research and also the similar companies to optimise their resources and energy to focus on the desired and the most influential core competencies.

Social implications

As the oil industry develops competitive advantage, its success will cascade down to stimulate the nation’s growth, support industry and services expansion and eventually develop the nation.

Originality/value

This study is a first of its kind in using AHP to rank core competencies with respect to competitive advantage, financial and strategic performance for an oil and gas company. The results can be used by oil and gas companies to enhance their overall performance.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Carlos A. Albacete‐Sáez, Maria Mar Fuentes‐Fuentes and Ana María Bojica

The purpose of this paper is to clarify whether there are differences in the implementation of quality management (QM) and the results achieved, based on the position of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify whether there are differences in the implementation of quality management (QM) and the results achieved, based on the position of the person responsible for QM and his/her strategic priorities.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 256 firms that have implemented QM are collected. A multigroup analysis with LISREL is employed to contrast the hypotheses using a sample of general managers on the one hand and of quality managers on the other.

Findings

This study shows that QM is stronger implemented when it is headed by the general manager than by the quality manager. The authors also find that in both samples of general managers and quality managers, only one of the three strategic priorities analyzed, cost orientation, shows a positive effect on financial results. When the influence of QM on financial results is considered, the relationship is significant just in the case of the sample of quality directors.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the analysis performed suggest lines of research that can substantially enrich the analysis of the role of management in the implementation of QM systems. A first step would be to expand the study sample, since the subsample for general managers was not very large. Gathering more recent data could contribute to strengthening the results obtained and to identifying additional explanatory variables. For example, information on functional experience or training could clarify the strategic focus adopted by managers.

Practical implications

This study highlights that the general manager's commitment to quality confers greater credibility in the rest of the organization. Although the general managers impose greater implementation of QM, they do not perceive that this influences the financial results achieved directly. The incorporation of strategic priorities in this study also shows that the perception of differentiation in marketing in firms that have implemented QM is similar both for quality managers and for general managers. However, the former (quality managers) also show that differentiation in innovation has a positive effect on QM.

Originality/value

Literature has shown an indisputable consensus on the relevance of leadership and the commitment of top management to the success of QM, but few studies provide more in‐depth specific knowledge of the characteristics and actions developed by the person who leads the commitment to quality. This study tackles the role of the manager responsible for QM in the firm, based on his or her functional position, whether general manager or quality manager. It contributes by investigating how a manager's strategic priorities condition the level of QM implementation, as well as the financial performance achieved.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 111 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Bruce E. Perrott

Under high turbulence conditions, a company's periodic planning cycle needs to be supplemented with a dynamic, real‐time, strategic‐issue‐management system. This paper

Abstract

Purpose

Under high turbulence conditions, a company's periodic planning cycle needs to be supplemented with a dynamic, real‐time, strategic‐issue‐management system. This paper aims to investigate this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of a prominent Australian healthcare organization shows the eight steps for how its management used the strategic issue management (SIM) process to identify, rank and address strategic issues in a rapidly changing business environment.

Findings

The paper finds that, for companies entering a period of turbulence, the tracking, monitoring, and management of strategic issues become s imperative so that the corporate, strategy, and capability do not fall out of alignment.

Practical implications

The company's survival may well depend on having a well‐developed process for decision‐makers to rapidly put forth critical rebalancing responses.

Originality/value

In the SIM approach, external issues are manifest as opportunities and threats, and internal issues as strengths and weaknesses. Issues are viewed in the context of the environment, strategy, and capability (E‐S‐C) framework. A 3×3 strategic issue priority matrix is used to map the level of urgency and potential impact of each issue.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

The purpose of this paper is to detail how the quality function deployment (QFD) methodology can help companies identify their strategic priorities and achieve customer

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to detail how the quality function deployment (QFD) methodology can help companies identify their strategic priorities and achieve customer satisfaction and increased competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines a case study example of the use of the QFD methodology. It looks at how well it was able to achieve its objectives.

Findings

Meeting customer expectations and creating customer satisfaction has become the Holy Grail for companies wishing to improve their competitiveness and profitability. Success, however, for many companies remains illusive. Their ability to align and integrate customer satisfaction with their overall strategic direction has proved to be more difficult that they thought. Their repeated desire to put the customer first is severely hampered by the lack of effective methodologies and tools to support the creation of an integrated process. Companies need a mechanism for aligning important concepts – a tool that will outline the important steps that they need to implement in order to successfully identify business priorities. One company, Geotherm Sri, a firm producing geothermal heat pumps, adopted QFD to help them with their strategic planning and achieve customer satisfaction. How well did QFD meet the challenge?

Practical implications

The paper provides a step‐by‐step guide of how to apply the QFD methodology to the task of defining business priorities.

Social implications

The paper improves corporate strategic decision making and allows for a more in‐depth analysis of customer expectations/needs.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the various steps involved in applying the QFD. It adopts a case study example that will help company strategic decision makers in their quest to determine their business priorities.

1 – 10 of over 45000