Search results

1 – 10 of over 98000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Michael T. Manion and Joseph Cherian

The paper seeks to show that the strategic types of service marketers (e.g. Prospectors, Defenders or Analyzers) match the types of success measures that they use to…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to show that the strategic types of service marketers (e.g. Prospectors, Defenders or Analyzers) match the types of success measures that they use to evaluate new services.

Design/methodology/approach

A theory is developed to show why service marketers of different strategic types use different success measures for the evaluation of new services. Using responses from 202 financial services marketers, strategic types are shown to relate in theoretically expected ways with the importance ratings of the categorized success measures.

Findings

Notable relationships among strategic types and their success measure are identified. Prospectors, for example, attach greater importance to growth performance measures, consistent with the growth orientation of their service development programs. Defenders, on the other hand, attach more importance than Prospectors to efficiency performance measures, which relate to their programs' efficiency orientation. Analyzers, interestingly, place more emphasis on objectives‐based performance measures, including strategic fit, than Prospectors.

Research limitations/implications

The sampling frame purposely contains only US financial services firms; as such, future research may build upon this single‐industry, single‐country study.

Practical implications

Academic success literature generally disregards the strategic types of respondents in measuring the success of service development programs. Practitioners, however, seek performance measures that are consistent with their firm's business strategy. This study provides a categorization of the most important success measures as appropriate to different strategic types.

Originality/value

The service success literature has often dealt with the question of “what causes success?” and has rarely confronted, head‐on, the question of “what is success?”. This paper addresses this critical research gap.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Chang E. Koh, Victor R. Prybutok, Sherry Ryan and Bashorat Ibragimova

The purpose of the study is to examine how information technology, strategic planning processes, and people interact in an emerging e‐government environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to examine how information technology, strategic planning processes, and people interact in an emerging e‐government environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A discriminant model was developed to test the ability to distinguish between the perceptions of high and low importance of six major e‐government functions as a function of a four‐item strategic e‐government readiness scale. An empirical study of a municipal government supported the discriminant model.

Findings

Government agencies must evaluate how strategic e‐government plans are developed, communicated, and integrated into the work environment. Without the proper understanding of the importance of e‐government initiatives, employees do not place high value on e‐government initiatives.

Research limitations/impli‘cations

This study focuses on one group of stakeholders, employees. Future studies might consider other interested parties, like citizens, business partners, and other government organizations. Future researchers could also compare various municipalities and identify those that are successful in implementing e‐government initiatives and explore the factors that contribute to that success.

Practical implications

Government agencies must ensure that their IT plans are aligned with business strategies as they attempt to expand their e‐government services. It is also important that the content and organizational importance of the strategic plans be effectively communicated to employees.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the current body of knowledge on e‐government by facilitating understanding and measurement of e‐government models.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Saleh Fahed Alkhatib

The purpose of this paper is to develop a new integrated approach for the strategic logistics outsourcing process through identifying the logistics independent success…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a new integrated approach for the strategic logistics outsourcing process through identifying the logistics independent success factors (ISFs) and linking them with the firm’s strategic objectives and logistics requirements. Then, the new integrated approach will be used to compare the outsourcing processes for the upstream and downstream supply chain members. Studies of logistics outsourcing reveal the strategic importance of this process and the increasing need for new strategic approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The design is based on mixed methodology and integrated approach. The fuzzy decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory technique has contributed to the construction of interdependent relationships, development of impact-relationship maps (IRMs) and identifying ISFs. The fuzzy quality function deployment technique was used to link the strategic objectives, logistics requirements and the ISFs to evaluate and select logistics service providers (LSPs) strategically. Finally, two case studies (upstream and downstream supply chains) are used to demonstrate the new approach effectiveness and to highlight the differences/similarities between the two streams.

Findings

In addition to the new strategic logistics outsourcing approach, this study analysed the impact relationships of the LSPs’ framework factors and constructed their maps. In all, 21 ISFs have been identified: 8 logistics key performance indicators, 7 logistics services and activities and 6 logistics resources and capabilities. The two streams’ comparison relived several differences in terms of strategic objectives, logistics requirements and ISFs.

Research limitations/implications

The new approach for strategic logistics outsourcing can help firms to perform a better multi-stakeholder multi-criteria strategic outsourcing process. In addition, the upstream–downstream supply chain comparison increases our understanding how different supply chain members perform different outsourcing processes.

Originality/value

This is one of the pioneering studies that compares the supply chain upstream–downstream perspectives to highlight logistics outsourcing similarities and differences. To the best of author’s knowledge, this is one of the first logistics outsourcing studies that identifies ISFs for strategic logistics outsourcing, provides the first IRMs for the strategic logistics factors and develops a new integrated approach for strategic logistics outsourcing

Details

Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5364

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

The Nature of Business Policy Business policy — or general management — is concerned with the following six major functions:

Abstract

The Nature of Business Policy Business policy — or general management — is concerned with the following six major functions:

Details

Management Decision, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Gülçin Büyüközkan and Öykü Ilıcak

SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis is a powerful approach for evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of an organization with an internal…

Abstract

Purpose

SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis is a powerful approach for evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of an organization with an internal perspective. The approach also takes into account the opportunities and the threats from an external point of view. These features make SWOT a commonly used approach in strategic management. The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrated SWOT analysis with multiple preference relations technique, to show the application of the proposed methodology, to prioritize the strategic factors and to present alternative strategies for ABC, a case company, which is targeting to use social media more effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, expert opinions are used to identify SWOT factors of ABC on social media. The obtained findings are evaluated and each factor is prioritized by means of the multiple preference relations technique.

Findings

The proposed evaluation model has four main groups, namely, strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats, under which 17 factors are identified. As a result of the evaluations, “O2: Opportunity to contact a large number of users simultaneously at affordable cost” has the highest importance level among other factors. Alternative strategies are developed based on the obtained results.

Originality/value

Decision-makers who have different backgrounds or ideas can state their preferences in different formats. Multiple preference relations technique is used to combine different assessments. SWOT analysis with multiple preference relations technique with a group decision-making perspective is proposed. This is the first time the method is used in the social media-related literature. With this study, the most appropriate social media strategic factors are selected for ABC and alternative strategies are determined based on the results.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Norma D’Annunzio-Green

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conclusion to the theme issue question “Is talent management a strategic priority in the hospitality sector?”

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conclusion to the theme issue question “Is talent management a strategic priority in the hospitality sector?”

Design/methodology/approach

The issues and debates relevant to the strategic question are summarised. Significant themes that have arisen across a number of papers are presented. This provides a clear indication of current issues in strategic talent management which are of relevance to hospitality practitioners and academics.

Findings

Five recurring themes are identified as being particularly relevant to hospitality organisations when considering a strategic approach to talent management. These are: the role of line mangers in employee development and well-being, talent management being used as a lever for culture change, the importance of contextualising approaches to talent management, the need for new and innovative ways of working to achieve a strategic approach to talent management and barriers for the development of a strategic approach caused by economic and day-to-day operational pressures.

Practical implications

The paper suggests a number of practical actions which could be taken to develop a more strategic approach to talent management.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that hospitality operators understand the importance of a strategic approach to talent management and are using a range of talent management processes to drive business success but that new solutions to long-standing challenges are required.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Antigoni Papadimitriou

There is currently limited knowledge of the strategic organizational routines such as strategic planning and benchmarking of universities in the Western Balkans (WB). Thus…

Abstract

Purpose

There is currently limited knowledge of the strategic organizational routines such as strategic planning and benchmarking of universities in the Western Balkans (WB). Thus the purpose of this paper is to map perceptions and concerns of institutional leadership about these routines within the public and private universities in the region.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey targeting all public and private universities in the WB was sent to the rector's and president's office. The survey data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods, calculating frequencies, and means.

Findings

Data revealed that the majority of both public and private universities have implemented strategic planning. Analysis of strategic planning between private and public universities indicated that averages scores were slightly higher in the private rather than the public universities. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis was among the statements that received higher scores (perceptions about implementation) from both types of universities. The relatively low scores from both types of institutions concerning perceived implementation and importance of benchmarking might imply that WB universities achieve their goals in a less competitive environment.

Originality/value

The significance of the paper lies in the fact that no existing studies have investigated strategic planning and benchmarking in the WB universities. To be able to build a potential baseline for further research, including the possibility for more comparative research both within and beyond the region, the selection of routines was taken from the US Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award for Performance Excellence in Education. This study contributes to the body of research for literature about strategic organizational routines and strategy-as-practice.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Carmen Aranda and Javier Arellano

The paper aims to explore how managers change their strategic view so that they come with a better understanding of the strategy. It uses two proxies for such…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore how managers change their strategic view so that they come with a better understanding of the strategy. It uses two proxies for such understanding: balance in beliefs (taken from performance measurement system literature) and consensus on strategic priorities (taken from strategic literature).

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal study is conducted in a financial institution during a strategic change communicated through a tailor‐made balanced scorecard (BSC). The changes are measured in the degree of understanding experienced by a set of 45 middle managers in each of the two phases in which the BSC implementation has been divided. The paper tests to what extent as the BSC implementation progresses there is a balancing in users' beliefs, an increase in consensus and alignment of managers' priorities; and finally, whether or not those proxies of managers' understanding are interchangeable.

Findings

Results show that the implementation of this BSC brought about a change in managers' beliefs by increasing the importance given to measures located in the lower BSC perspectives (called balancing effect), as well as an increase in the degree of consensus on strategic priorities. However, in the paper more balance in managers' beliefs were not necessarily associated with a higher degree of consensus and alignment. The two proxies are not interchangeable and the balancing effect was found to be ineffective and insufficient in providing an explanation for the consensus formation process.

Originality/value

The paper provides empirical evidence on how middle managers change their mental models and improve their understanding of the strategy. The paper helps in aligning performance measurement systems literature and strategic literature.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Veronica H. Villena, Guanyi Lu, Luis R. Gomez-Mejia and Elena Revilla

Supply chain managers (SC managers) may make less than optimal decisions for the firm when facing compensation and employment risks. The purpose of this paper is to study…

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain managers (SC managers) may make less than optimal decisions for the firm when facing compensation and employment risks. The purpose of this paper is to study two relevant factors (target setting and strategic importance of the supply chain function) that may drive SC managers to perceive more or less risk to their welfare.

Design/methodology/approach

The study combines survey data from 133 firms with secondary data in order to reduce source bias and enhance the validity of results. The authors also conducted interviews with supply chain and human resources managers.

Findings

The results show that top managers can alter SC managers’ perceived risks. Ambitious targets drive compensation risk but not employment risk. The supply chain function’s strategic importance, on the other hand, decreases employment risk but increases compensation risk.

Research limitations/implications

The authors emphasize two ways that the top management team (TMT) influences SC managers’ perceived personal welfare but acknowledge that there may be others factors. Due to the topic sensitivity, the authors could not collect data on all variables (e.g. individual characteristics) that may affect risk perception. The findings are based on Spanish firms and may not be generalized to other contexts.

Practical implications

This research proposes three suggestions. First, compensation and employment risks should be considered separately when designing compensation and evaluation systems. Second, appropriate performance targets may put compensation risk in a reasonable range that is neither too high to prevent risky-yet-beneficial decisions nor too low to allow nonfeasance. Third, escalating the supply chain’s strategic importance effectively offsets employment risk.

Originality/value

Scholars have repeatedly shown the negative outcomes of SC managers’ perceived compensation and employment risks. Yet, little attention has been given to their antecedents. The study explores two relevant antecedents and provides integrative empirical evidence regarding actions top leaders can take to manage SC managers’ perceived risk and subsequently enhance firm performance.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Loukas K. Tsironis and Panagiotis Petros Matthopoulos

Supply chain (SC) is a homogeneous and interconnected network of firms which manages supplies, storages and handles material, information, personnel, equipment and final…

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain (SC) is a homogeneous and interconnected network of firms which manages supplies, storages and handles material, information, personnel, equipment and final products throughout its length. The SC can be the means by which businesses add value to customers and therefore competitive advantage in the international market. Competitiveness no longer exists among individual members of a SC but between SCs. International literature pointed out, that strategy and competitiveness associated with specific strategic priorities. In this paper will be documented that the priorities as objectives of strategic importance comprise the key areas for the performance of the SC network. To support this, a systematic framework of strategic priorities, will be developed, which will visualize the major SC assessment areas that the SC network should turn its improvement efforts. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 200 high level managers from 71 Greek manufacturing companies covering the whole country using their own SC networks took part in the study. Data analysis were conducted to create a model that describes the strategic priorities which are important, for the competitive advantage of their SC network.

Findings

The results revealed seven critical strategic priorities: internal flexibility, production quality, waste reduction, customer focus, sustainability, reduction of production cost and efficiency. This paper analytically explores the strategic practices that seem to influence SC network performance and generates a systematic framework of the critical strategic priorities of the SC network performance.

Practical implications

The proposed framework has six major advantages. First the research outcome enables managers to design their SC strategy. Second, proved the great importance of the strategic priorities institutionalization. Third, makes clear to stakeholders which are the SC network performance issues to consider. Fourth, the proposed framework could serve as a suitable formula for assessing the effectiveness and readiness of SC to face the competition. Fifth, it is an effective way of prioritizing the strategic practices as it provides the most important areas on which the firm can base tasks like evaluation, benchmarking and comparison of its SC both as a network and as individual firms. Finally, the proposed framework is an effective way to evaluate the consistency of strategic objectives and actions adopted for the SC.

Originality/value

Literature review revealed a very important conclusion. It has been developed a broad discussion concerning issues on strategic practices which are responsible for the competitive advantage of the SC network. However, there has not been a significant effort on integrating all the practices under the spectrum of the SC in order to distinguish the most important of these practices that can lead to competitive advantages.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 98000