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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Hikmot Adunola Koleoso, Modupe Moronke Omirin and Femi Adejumo

The literature propounds that facilities management (FM) differs from other building support services (BSS) because it features a significant strategic content. However…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature propounds that facilities management (FM) differs from other building support services (BSS) because it features a significant strategic content. However, research indicates that this deep seated strategic and value-adding practice is mostly unavailable except in the most matured markets. The purpose of this paper is to compare the strategic content of the functions performed by FM practitioners with that of other BSS providers in Lagos, the commercial hub of Nigeria. This is to determine if the content of the FM functions is comparatively more strategic and invariably more value-adding than that of other BSS providers as indicated in literature and also to identify required areas of improvement, both for practice and training.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was carried out through self-administered questionnaire directed to a sample of 123 BSS providers that work with office buildings in Lagos, Nigeria. The data collected were analyzed using frequency counts, means, χ2 test and Wilcoxon signed rank test.

Findings

Rather than the strategic tasks, the FM group as with the non-FM group were more regularly involved with the less specialized facilities operations/maintenance and facilities support service tasks such as, security, fire, emergency management, cleaning and waste management. Specialized FM support service tasks such as mail services, reprographics, catering and travel services, were least often performed by both groups. The study found that facilities managers were slightly more involved than the non-facilities managers in performing the strategic group of tasks. This was indicated by the higher cumulative mean values and ranking of the level of involvement. The facilities managers also ranked higher in their involvement in the individual strategic tasks. The study also shows that FM practitioners use the more strategic ways to determine the needs of users. These findings imply that FM presents a slightly more strategic edge, which is, however, insufficient.

Practical implications

Although the FM practitioners may feature a slightly more strategic content of functions than their non-FM counterparts, the edge is insufficient to add significant value to clients’ business as postulated in literature. Lagos FM practitioners must become more involved in strategic functions in order to enhance FM’s value-adding edge and hence distinguish it better from other BSS practices.

Originality/value

The study positions the Nigerian FM practice in the light of expectations in literature and re-affirms the supposition that the practice is relatively strategically immature. It also identifies the contingent needs of local and multinational organizations that may require or intend to provide FM and other BSS in the Nigerian context, invariably allowing for international comparisons.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Nicola Brackertz and Russell Kenley

Strategic management of facilities is now generally accepted best practice. Appraisal of facility performance has developed correspondingly and financial measures are no…

Abstract

Strategic management of facilities is now generally accepted best practice. Appraisal of facility performance has developed correspondingly and financial measures are no longer seen as the prime indicator of success. Holistic models that include the processes supporting fulfilment of an organisation’s strategic aims are now considered to provide more appropriate measures. Recent focus in the service‐oriented context of local government authority (LGA) facility management has particularly turned toward such models. This paper discusses the issues and inherent tensions arising from the strategic measurement of local government facilities in a service delivery context. It is argued that outwardly the strategic objective of service delivery is common to the private and public sectors, but fundamental differences in the desired outcomes and responsibilities of the two sectors require different solutions. Even if one accepts the current trend in ‘balanced’ performance measurement, differing parameters in the private and public sectors impact on the design and evaluation of performance measures, especially in relation to process, efficiency, strategy formulation and responsiveness of the organisation to customer needs. If a facility is considered to be an enabler of processes that lead to desired outcomes, these differences must necessarily affect the design of facility performance measurement tools. The research with eight LGAs, reported here, supports the need for a new model for the evaluation of community facilities applicable in the local government context. Using stakeholder‐based focus groups, the need was identified for a service‐oriented model, where the facility is understood as the intersection of aspects of service provision, physical building substance and the community utilising the facility.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Paul Featherstone and David Baldry

This paper stresses the importance of the strategic integration of the organisational facilities management function as being an essential prerequisite towards facilities

Abstract

This paper stresses the importance of the strategic integration of the organisational facilities management function as being an essential prerequisite towards facilities and organisational effectiveness. The impact of both the strategic and operational facilities management function on community health‐care facility users is also documented. The value of the facilities management function in terms of other health‐care related organisational core deliverables is also observed. Mechanisms for general organisational facilities management improvement are identified and a number of facilities management performance measuring tools outlined.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 14 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Paul Featherstone and David Baldry

This paper stresses the importance of the strategic integration of the organisational facilities management function as being an essential prerequisite towards facilities

Abstract

This paper stresses the importance of the strategic integration of the organisational facilities management function as being an essential prerequisite towards facilities and organisational effectiveness. The impact of both the strategic and operational facilities management function on community health‐care facility users is also documented. The value of the facilities management function in terms of other health‐care related organisational core deliverables is also observed. Mechanisms for general organisational facilities management improvement are identified and a number of facilities management performance measuring tools outlined.

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2009

Zehra Waheed and Scott Fernie

Facilities management has inherited the understanding of how organisations work as value creators from various management models such as Porter's, where value is created…

Abstract

Purpose

Facilities management has inherited the understanding of how organisations work as value creators from various management models such as Porter's, where value is created through “primary” and “support” activities. The gap between the aspiration of strategic relevance and reality has prompted the facilities management profession to begin to address the question of whether facilities management is a legitimate discipline with attendant theories, research and practice. This paper attempts to bring an alternative theoretical perspective to such aspirations.

Design/methodology/approach

Facilities management arrangements and their value as a key organisational competence are outlined. Finally knowledge‐based functional competency is described that encapsulates the new perspective.

Findings

The paper provides an alternative perspective that will facilitate its acceptance as a strategically placed corporate function. A new knowledge‐based legitimisation for facilities management is proposed, marking a shift from facilities management's functional knowledge to an organisation‐wide knowledge base.

Practical implications

The way the discipline of facilities management is located within the business organisation sees its primary role in being fundamentally “supportive” to the parent organisation's primary function whether it is product provision or service delivery. This is problematic for a discipline that has been trying to align itself as strategically oriented. This orientation needs to be redefined to allow facilities management to be rather seen as a knowledge‐based core competency and a function that permeates the boundaries of primary and support functions.

Originality/value

The paper encourages wider debate and dialogue within the community on what appears to be a pivotal crossroads in the development of the discipline.

Details

Facilities, vol. 27 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Danny Shiem‐Shin Then

Facilities management” (FM) has been described as a hybrid management discipline that combines people, property and process management expertise to provide vital services…

Abstract

Facilities management” (FM) has been described as a hybrid management discipline that combines people, property and process management expertise to provide vital services in support of the organisation. Attempts by academics and practitioners to define the scope and content of FM inevitably incurred the displeasure of some quarters of this emerging FM industry that has shown signs of rapid growth in North America, Europe, and Australia and New Zealand, and the Far East in the last two decades. This paper represents a personal view based on a study that covered a multi‐sector survey of five industrial and commercial sectors in the UK in 1996. The focus of the research is to provide a business perspective to the role of operational facilities. One of the objectives of the research is to explain the need for strategic business planning to incorporate and, indeed, integrate the facilities dimensions of business delivery. Whilst conceptual in its presentation, there is increasing evidence that the views and models contained within this paper are worthy of serious consideration by practitioners in the field

Details

Facilities, vol. 17 no. 12/13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property…

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Property Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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