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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Jukka-Pekka Heikkilä, Olga Rentto and Yuqin Feng

The purpose of this study is to explore e-HRM in MNC setting from various stakeholder´s perspectives. The chapter aims to understand the motives behind the implementation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore e-HRM in MNC setting from various stakeholder´s perspectives. The chapter aims to understand the motives behind the implementation of e-HRM in an MNC. Second, the chapter studies the impacts e-HRM has on various stakeholders and finally aims to deliver understanding of the concept of strategic e-HRM in an MNC.

Methodology/approach

The study follows a qualitative case study method and the interviewees represented three groups: top management, HR professionals, and line managers.

Findings

Main findings suggest that the implementation was motivated by issues related to standardization and overall introduction of a strategic way of working. As an impact of e-HRM implementation, the control of subsidiaries became easier; external and internal transparency and HR image improved; HR operations gained efficiency; and the possibility for “fact based decision making” enabled strategic e-HRM realization for some stakeholders, with the exception of line managers who were considerably more skeptical about issues related to strategic e-HRM.

Practical implications

The issues of change management and system training should be transparent. The strategic benefits could be realized for the line managers and operational HR by discussing how e-HRM impacts their work and roles and how they contribute to achieving the business targets.

Social implications

The chapter highlights the need for communication in all levels of MNC, and the needs to update e-HRM regularly and taking equally into account various stakeholder’s perspectives.

Originality/value

We pioneer a multilevel perspective of e-HRM implementation and impact in an MNC setting and improve the understanding of taking account various stakeholder’s views when aiming for strategic e-HRM partnerships.

Details

Electronic HRM in the Smart Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-315-9

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Esther Njoku, Huub Ruël, Hefin Rowlands, Linda Evans and Michael Murdoch

There is currently a proliferation of digital analytics and machine/artificial intelligence productivity tools for creating and sustaining competitive advantage through…

Abstract

There is currently a proliferation of digital analytics and machine/artificial intelligence productivity tools for creating and sustaining competitive advantage through strategic flexibility. Transformational e-HRM enables organizations to achieve and sustain competitive advantage through exploitation of these new productivity tools and approaches. However, it has been observed that many organizations have not been able to realize this. Using findings from an empirical exploration of e-HRM’s contribution to sustaining business performance, derived through an interpretative phenomenological analysis of a single case study, we propose in this chapter that for organizations to leverage the productivity gains of implementing Transformational e-HRM, HR and frontline managers require access to readily available artificial intelligence productivity tools. For e-HRM to contribute to sustaining business performance, we add to strategic flexibility theory that this can be realized by using e-HRM to enable strategic flexibility and adaptive capability. As we propose that it will be about organizations using the strategic capability derived by using Transformational e-HRM to create flexible and adaptive organizations. Its implications for practice are stated.

Details

HRM 4.0 For Human-Centered Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-535-2

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

François L’Écuyer and Louis Raymond

This study aims to explore the relationship between IT and HRM in the context of manufacturing SMEs, more specifically the relationship between strategic HRM and e-HRM as…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the relationship between IT and HRM in the context of manufacturing SMEs, more specifically the relationship between strategic HRM and e-HRM as well as the performance effects of this relationship. The conceptual framework is founded upon the resource-based view (RBV), specifically upon the strategic HRM and e-HRM capabilities of SMEs and upon the strategic alignment of these capabilities in the form of capability configurations or “gestalts.”

Methodology/approach

To answer the research questions, a questionnaire was constructed and mailed to 1854 manufacturing SMEs in the province of Quebec, Canada, producing 216 valid responses that were used for statistical analysis purposes. Capability configurations were identified through a cluster analysis of the e-HRM and strategic HRM capabilities developed by these firms.

Findings

Using structural equation modeling to validate the research model, a causal analysis confirmed a positive influence of the sampled SMEs’ strategic orientation upon their development of strategic HRM capabilities. More importantly, a higher level of alignment between the SMEs’ strategic HRM and e-HRM capabilities was associated to a higher level of strategic HRM performance.

Originality/value

To our knowledge, ours is the first study to show interest in the effect of the strategic alignment of HRM and IT capabilities upon HRM performance, by adopting a configurational perspective and considering organizational IT from a functional point of view. Given the specific context of SMEs, the focus was on e-HRM capabilities related to the IT infrastructure of these organizations and the IT competencies of individuals related to HRM.

Details

Electronic HRM in the Smart Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-315-9

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Placide Poba-Nzaou, Sylvestre Uwizeyemunugu, khadija Gaha and Mélanie Laberge

The purpose of this paper was to develop a taxonomy of organizations based on business value (BV) underlying electronic human resource management (e-HRM) adoption motivations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to develop a taxonomy of organizations based on business value (BV) underlying electronic human resource management (e-HRM) adoption motivations.

Design/methodology/approach

A taxonomy was developed using cluster analysis of the online case stories of 146 firms. Results were validated using discriminant analysis. Differences in organization and environmental characteristics across clusters were examined.

Findings

Seven meaningful and distinct clusters were uncovered showing asymmetry in the consideration of strategic BV underlying the motivations of e-HRM adoption. Statistical tests revealed that the seven clusters have high internal validity. Statistically significant differences in organizational conditions were found among clusters.

Research limitations/implications

This research offers an empirically and conceptually grounded taxonomy of organizations that reveals strategic and nonstrategic BV that organizations actually put forward and the way they combine together to form different profiles. This research is based on secondary data, that is, data initially gathered for a distinct goal different from this research.

Practical implications

The developed taxonomy provides human resource (HR) managers, executives, researchers and consultants a useful way to describe and understand motivations underlying e-HRM adoption. The taxonomy may also facilitate valid and systematic assessment of e-HRM effectiveness.

Originality/value

This research moves the debate beyond normative arguments to a more analytic assessment of the actual practice of organizations regarding e-HRM adoption and expected BV.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Arnela Ceric

Little is known about actual organisational experiences and challenges with using e-HRM. The focus of this chapter is on the challenges that Australian HR professionals…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about actual organisational experiences and challenges with using e-HRM. The focus of this chapter is on the challenges that Australian HR professionals face in using e-HRM and achieving e-HRM outputs.

Methodology

Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with five HR professionals in different Australian organisations. Content analysis was applied to analyse the transcribed interviews.

Findings

Potential of e-HRM to bring efficiency, access to HR data, reporting, as well as contributions to the overall business strategy are thwarted by three groups of e-HRM challenges that HR professionals experience: e-HRM technical issues, HR issues, and e-HRM development issues.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are based on the five interviews with HR professionals in Australian organisations only. Line managers, employees, and managers from other business functions as well as small businesses have not been included in the research sample.

Practical implications

By addressing the e-HRM challenges, HR professionals can achieve e-HRM benefits and enhance their contribution to the overall business.

Originality/value

A major contribution is to show that the HRM literature barely considers the e-HRM challenges facing HR professionals. Another contribution is to provide an understanding of e-HRM challenges in the Australian context.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Electronic HRM in the Smart Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-315-9

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Stefan Strohmeier and Ruediger Kabst

The purpose of this paper is to investigate types, contexts and consequences of electronic HRM (e-HRM) configurations to get a deeper understanding of the reasons, kinds…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate types, contexts and consequences of electronic HRM (e-HRM) configurations to get a deeper understanding of the reasons, kinds and success of different e-HRM types.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a cross-sectional survey of senior HR persons and analyses data with exploratory methods, i.e. cluster analysis, classification tree analysis and analysis of variance.

Findings

The results show that actually three configurations of e-HRM – “non users”, “operational users” and “power users” – exist. These can be explained by a sparse, yet meaningful set of contextual variables. All three configurations markedly contribute to organisational success, whereas the “power user”-configuration exceeds the other configurations.

Research limitations/implications

The employed e-HRM typology shows a precursory status and the empirical study is exploratory in nature. Thus, searching for a clearer theoretical foundation, improving the hypothesising of variables and undertaking further empirical studies to replicate the findings are necessary future steps.

Practical implications

Not always a maximum of electronic support seems to be indicated. Depending on the respective organisational context, even no electronic support, or else, a merely operational electronic support appears to be admissible; while, however, in larger and strategic-oriented organisations full electronic support outperforms other configurations.

Originality/value:

–The paper focuses on different e-HRM types and gives some first insights into reasons, kinds and success of different configurations. This should lead to a refined understanding of e-HRM and evoke further research on the subject.

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Carole Tansley, Susan Kirk, Hazel Williams and Harry Barton

The purpose of this paper is to examine and conceptualise the ways in which a balance can be achieved between optimising the efficiency and effectiveness of electronic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine and conceptualise the ways in which a balance can be achieved between optimising the efficiency and effectiveness of electronic human resource management (e-HRM) systems for human resource management (HRM) and enabling innovation to occur during the system implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretive case study of a UK local authority e-HRM system implementation is examined using the notion of ambidexterity as an analytical device. Ambidexterity relates to how an organisation develops the ability to operate efficiently in the now, while at the same time being able to adapt to environmental changes around and ahead of them in order to grow into the future.

Findings

As an intra-organisational capability, ambidexterity is found to derive from the simultaneous interplay and balancing of dual capabilities: exploitation and exploration. e-HRM exploitation concerned the capability to generate new knowledge with innovatory effects, created through the everyday practices performed by practitioners at all levels in the organisation. e-HRM exploration, rather than being a purposeful act, was found to be an accidental consequence of engaging in exploitation to maintain the status quo.

Research limitations/implications

The notion of ambidexterity was originally constructed within strategic management and studies in the field have previously been confined to this area. This makes this study theoretically and empirically experimental, making it a challenging research endeavour. Another limitation is that the authors only sought views from the interviewees on how external forces might limit or facilitate their ambidexterity, as opposed to actually studying those forces themselves.

Practical implications

The authors suggest that those in organisations who are responsible for strategic HRM need to consider ways in which “intentional” opportunities for ambidexterity in e-HRM systems implementation can be identified and harnessed to ensure better balances between exploitation and exploration in such endeavours and to guard against innovation only occurring through chance.

Originality/value

There is a lack of detailed investigation of how organisations actually achieve ambidexterity, particularly in three under-researched areas: ambidexterity in the public sector, at human resourcing functional level and e-HRM systems implementation. Bundling these three areas into an integrated examination allows us to both identify how exploitation and exploration play out in the ambidextrous practices of an e-HRM project and also to identify the dimensions of ambidexterity in balancing e-HRM work.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Gary W. Florkowski

Three decades of academic and professional discourse on HR technologies (HRTs) have produced continued disagreement over construct definitions and research streams that…

Abstract

Three decades of academic and professional discourse on HR technologies (HRTs) have produced continued disagreement over construct definitions and research streams that are highly fragmented. These realities suggest that greater consistency in meanings is sorely needed if we are to integrate and upgrade knowledge in this area. This chapter draws on the findings of a systematic research review to properly define the content domains of human resource information systems (HRIS), virtual human resources (virtual HR), electronic human resource management (e-HRM), and business-to-employee (B2E) systems. An integrative synthesis was performed on 242 system-level writings that appeared in the literature from 1983 to 2017. The weight of the evidence strongly supports treating HRIS, virtual HR, e-HRM, and B2E systems as independent, complimentary constructs. While the first three comprise a firm’s HRT system, the fourth construct is more appropriately positioned in the business-collaborative system. The sample was further evaluated with an analytic framework to detect patterns of practice in research designs. This revealed that much more attention has been focused on system actions and outcomes than on attitudes and system characteristics. Different units of analysis were well represented aside from trans-organizational studies. Finally, a case is made for better contextualizing HRT research by recognizing differences in assimilation stage, functional penetration, and collective proficiency. These factors are rarely mentioned, let alone studied, raising additional concerns about measurement error. Detailed suggestions are offered on ways to incorporate them. Together, these materials should promote more sophisticated and generalizable assessments of technology, improving our ability to understand its impacts.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-322-3

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Johan Gregeby and Mårten Hugosson

This chapter addresses a lack of theory building in electronic-HRM (e-HRM) research and attempts to contribute with a (re-)conceptualisation of e-HRM as a nexus of…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter addresses a lack of theory building in electronic-HRM (e-HRM) research and attempts to contribute with a (re-)conceptualisation of e-HRM as a nexus of practices and their material arrangements.

Methodology/approach

The work draws on theories from information systems research, science and technology studies, and sociology and organisation studies.

Findings

The (re-)conceptualisation indicates that future research should make further enquiries into the role of human agency and political processes in e-HRM.

Practical implications

As a methodological pathway a combination of ethnography and philosophical hermeneutics is proposed, enabling the achievement of a required pertinent sensibility in the study of social practices and human intentionality. Action research is also considered to be relevant for an engaged e-HRM scholarship.

Social implications

The social implication of this research is the advancement of theories that emphasise the importance of human agency, morality and materiality in organisational processes.

Originality/value of the chapter

The conceptualisation may thus facilitate research that reveal insights about involvement, reciprocity and power in e-HRM projects – knowledge that can direct the development of e-HRM project teams and thus facilitate strategic HRM.

1 – 10 of 253