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Abstract

Details

Knowledge Management and the Practice of Storytelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-480-7

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Jeppe Fonnesbaek and Morten Melbye Andersen

Introduces LEGO’s Bionicle toy: it was aimed at boys aged 7‐12 and was developed as part of a new ongoing epic story, with the emphasis on this “movie” aspect rather than…

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Abstract

Introduces LEGO’s Bionicle toy: it was aimed at boys aged 7‐12 and was developed as part of a new ongoing epic story, with the emphasis on this “movie” aspect rather than on the constructional aspects of the toy: constructional toys are a shrinking market because boys no longer want to take the time to complete them. Relates the Bionicle concept to LEGO’s previous successful toys Slizer and RoboRiders, and to its existing success in buying into stories like Star Wars. Describes how LEGO worked closely with Advance to develop the story and to market the concept in advance of the product; this was very successful. Moves on to the next step, which was to market the “movie” by a wide range of media, such as posters and cinema advertisements, plus media that could carry the parts of the story itself – a website, a CD‐ROM and comics; this carefully designed mosaic of media was accompanied by compelling graphics, phasing the story to maintain involvement, and getting the children to pass on the story parts to each other (i.e. peer‐to‐peer marketing). Concludes with how the campaign has benefited the overall perception of LEGO and led to a wider product range.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Craig Wortmann

The paper seeks to identify why we need to get past the bits and bullets – e‐mails, text messaging and PowerPoint presentations – and tell the full story. Story is the

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to identify why we need to get past the bits and bullets – e‐mails, text messaging and PowerPoint presentations – and tell the full story. Story is the most powerful way to change a culture. By identifying with beliefs and behaviors, stories are shown as the lynchpin for social, economic, organizational, and individual change.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper shows how cultural change is driven by stories and provides a process through which leaders can work to drive change within their own organizations using the Story Tools: WinBook, StoryMatrix and Story Coach, eScenes and Scenarios. Together the tools provide the framework for leaders to be more effective and consistent leaders.

Findings

Stories are the most successful way to change a culture. By “adding back” context, stories carry success and failure messages, they allow us to reflect and learn by drawing us in, and finally stories influence us to create the right kinds of behavior.

Practical implications

This paper offers practical tools for leaders to capture and tell stories that enhance their leadership skills, as well as offering insights into changing a company's culture.

Originality/value

The originality of this approach to story lies in the story tools – StoryMatrix, Story Coach, WinBook, eScenes and Scenarios developed by the author and his company WisdomTools. The authors's book, What's Your Story? Using Stories to Ignite Performance and Be More Successful, provides the reader with more in‐depth background on the original Story Tools.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

Rhea Joyce Rubin

Bernard Malamud said “…a short story packs a self in a few pages predicating a lifetime. The drama is tense, happens fast, and is more often than not outlandish. In a few…

Abstract

Bernard Malamud said “…a short story packs a self in a few pages predicating a lifetime. The drama is tense, happens fast, and is more often than not outlandish. In a few pages the story portrays the complexity of a life while producing the surprise and effect of knowledge…” According to Helen Haines, “The short story may be, perhaps, best defined as the equivalent in fiction to the lyric in poetry and the one‐act play in drama: the intensified, concentrated expression of an idea or theme…It demands greater, but less sustained, mastery of style than does the novel…The brevity of the short story, while it limits, also makes for freedom…” The freedoms it allows include posing problems without solutions, ignoring logical development to a conclusion, and referring to vague ideas which are never detailed. These allowable omissions of the short story lead to its great power for the reader. For a short story is only completed through the interaction of its reader. “The readers are forced into active collaboration: they flesh out the story through memory, sympathy, and insight, and they feel its truth as immediately as a toothache.”

Details

Collection Building, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2022

Rebecca Bolt and Helen Tregidga

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role and implications of storytelling and narrative as a means of making sense of, and giving sense to, the ambiguous concept…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role and implications of storytelling and narrative as a means of making sense of, and giving sense to, the ambiguous concept of materiality.

Design/methodology/approach

The use of stories was “discovered” through the authors' attempts to “make sense” of data from 16 interviews with participants from the financial and nonfinancial reporting and assurance contexts. The authors analyse the participants' use of stories through a sensemaking/sensegiving lens.

Findings

While participants struggle to define what materiality is, they are able to tell “stories” about materiality in action. The authors find stories are a key vehicle through which participants make sense of and give sense to materiality, for themselves and (an)other. Participants tell three types of stories in sensemaking/sensegiving processes: the lived, the adopted and the hypothetical. The authors further identify “rehearsed” and “ongoing” narratives, which take any of the three story types. The use of stories to make and give sense to materiality reveals a disconnect between the static, technical definitions of materiality currently favoured by standard setters and guidance providers, and the creative authoring processes the participants employ.

Practical implications

The authors argue for a move towards the use of stories and narratives about materiality in standard setting, specifically “materiality in action”, which the findings suggest may assist in creating shared understandings of the ambiguous concept.

Originality/value

While previous research considers what materiality means within financial and nonfinancial reporting and assurance contexts, the authors empirically analyse how people understand and make sense/give sense to materiality. The authors also contribute to the use of sensemaking/sensegiving processes within the accounting literature.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2022

Christiana Tercia, Thorsten Teichert, Dini Anggraeni Sirad and Krishnamurti Murniadi

This study aims to tap into the storytelling’s effects of evoking personal and historical memories and their emotions on travelers’ intention to visit dark tourism sites.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to tap into the storytelling’s effects of evoking personal and historical memories and their emotions on travelers’ intention to visit dark tourism sites.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental study was performed. The authors created a story centered on dark tourism as their stimulus. The respondents received two stories in the form of printed ads. The presence and absence of a story character manipulated the stimulus. In addition to the experimental factors, four measurement constructs were included in the model: evoked historical memory, evoked personal memory, evoked emotion and intention to visit.

Findings

The results show that evoking historical and personal memories leads to traveler intention to visit the dark tourism sites whether or not the character is present or absent in the story. This study also reveals that only evoked personal memory positively affects individuals’ travel by evoking emotion. Furthermore, evoked historical memories also directly impact the evoke emotion, but only when the character is absent in the story.

Research limitations/implications

This study has three limitations. First, the measurement of emotion in this study only refers to a general measurement and does not specify between negative and positive emotions. Second, the story in the current study only focuses on one example of a natural disaster. Third, this study only used students to represent Generation Z respondents, so it would be interesting if future research compared the results across different generations.

Practical implications

The use of a reflective narrative in storytelling can be one of the options. Marketers should be cautious when using a character when it comes to dark tourism as it might have a boomerang effect, making the destination becoming unattractive to travelers, particularly, if the story tells more about the historical side of dark tourism. Managers of tourist destinations can leverage past visitors to be brand ambassadors of a place since humans share knowledge and experiences through stories and anecdotes. These personal touches can lend the personal aspects of past visitors to current ones, which can evoke memories better than an official message from a tourism board.

Originality/value

This research investigates the role of storytelling in eliciting travelers’ memories and emotional responses and how this response eventually influences their intention to visit a dark-based destination.

Details

Consumer Behavior in Tourism and Hospitality, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2752-6666

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Knowledge Management and the Practice of Storytelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-480-7

Abstract

Details

Connecting Values to Action: Non-Corporeal Actants and Choice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-308-2

Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2011

Stefinee Pinnegar and Mary Lynn Hamilton

Purpose – This chapter explores the complexity and tensions inherent in the question of how story becomes research with particular attention to the use of narrative…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter explores the complexity and tensions inherent in the question of how story becomes research with particular attention to the use of narrative research in studying teacher education.

Approach – To do this, we begin each section with a narrative fragment from earlier published research in which we collaborated (Hamilton, 1995). Then, we use narrative research analysis tools to explore the meaning of each fragment, lay that understanding alongside research accounts and wonderings about research in and by teacher educators, and consider the fragment in terms of specific understandings of narrative inquiry as research methodology for studying teacher education.

Findings – This chapter examines when story moves to research while probing the tensions between knowledge and living as teachers, teacher educators, and teacher educator researchers. Using the first fragment, we explore fulfilling roles as a teacher educator by using a narrative analysis tool that teases apart the author's role of narrator, actor, and character. In the second fragment, we consider the contexts that influence a teacher educator researcher by examining the fragment to determine the levels of narrative. In the third fragment, we utilize the tools of plotlines and tensions to unpack the competing plotlines of epistemology (modernist vs. narrative) ending with an examination of the importance of ontology in narrative work. In our fourth fragment, we unpack nine approaches to narrative by examining the essential role of story for each element of the research process.

Research implications – As teacher educator researchers, we always stand in the midst – in the midst of the story where we may be simultaneously narrator, character, and actor, in the midst of living the research we are most interested in studying. Within a single moment, we can act as teacher, teacher educator, and teacher educator researcher when our research focuses on our own practice. Our experience as we live it represents the tension between arrival and arriving.

Value – The value of this chapter is the way in which it demonstrates narrative analysis and distinguishes among various approaches to narrative research.

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