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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

David Burns, Mary Conway Dato-on and Chris Manolis

– The purpose of this paper is to develop and begin to validate a scale to assess the shopping environment preferences of Hispanic consumers in the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and begin to validate a scale to assess the shopping environment preferences of Hispanic consumers in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consists of 160 Hispanic consumers attending a Hispanic festival in the southeast USA. A questionnaire contained items to measure shopping environment preferences and scales to measure materialism, hedonic shopping motivations, and perceived discrimination.

Findings

The findings suggest a second-order model where three factors (familiarity, price, and experience) load onto a single second-order construct of shopping environment preferences. The result is a scale consisting of three factors permitting the exploration of the retail environmental preferences of Hispanic consumers in the USA.

Practical implications

The study develops a scale that can be applied by US retailers to gain additional knowledge of their Hispanic consumers, thus enabling strategies to be developed that potentially enhance their engagement in retail environments.

Originality/value

Given the size of this segment and its increasing impact on the retail market, surprisingly, Hispanic consumers in the USA have received relatively little research attention.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Mary L. Joyce and David R. Lambert

Research shows that store image is an important component of a consumer’s store choice and use of a store environment. Most of this research ignores how store image might…

Abstract

Research shows that store image is an important component of a consumer’s store choice and use of a store environment. Most of this research ignores how store image might vary across different consumer segments. Examines the impact of age on final consumers’ perceptions of retail store image. Reveals that shopper age significantly affects perceptions of store image. Younger consumers feel more positive about both store characteristics and salesperson attributes than do older shoppers. Retailers employing store image research should be mindful of how the age of different consumers could affect their findings.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2018

Ju Yeun Jang, Eunsoo Baek and Ho Jung Choo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of a fashion store’s visual complexity on consumers’ behaviour. Considering environmental order and individuals…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of a fashion store’s visual complexity on consumers’ behaviour. Considering environmental order and individuals’ sensation-seeking tendencies, the authors examine the effect of visually complex fashion stores on consumers in a more conclusive way to address the inconsistent effect found in the previous literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This study features a 3 (visual complexity level: low, medium, high) × 2 (environmental order condition: low, high) between subjects design, with individual sensation-seeking tendency included as a moderator. Using this design, an online survey was administered to 188 participants in South Korea.

Findings

The results indicate that there is a three-way interaction, where the interaction effect of visual complexity and environmental order is moderated by individuals’ sensation-seeking tendency. The effect of visual complexity on approach behaviours had an inverted U-shape in the low-order condition, while had a positive linear shape in the high-order condition, and the interaction effect was significant only for high-sensation seekers.

Practical implications

The findings assist practitioners in establishing strategies for visual merchandising and store design within fashion stores. It is suggested that retailers consider environmental order when organising a large amount of varied merchandise in a complex environment. Store managers must adjust the complexity and environmental order to meet the optimal stimulation level of their target consumers.

Originality/value

This study strengthens the literature on visual complexity by applying the concept to the retail environment. The results provide a significant contribution to the literature because they show how individual-level and store-level variables interact to influence consumer behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Bela Florenthal and Aviv Shoham

This paper has two purposes. First, it aims to propose an alternative conceptualization for interactivity that distinguishes between four interactivity modes: human…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper has two purposes. First, it aims to propose an alternative conceptualization for interactivity that distinguishes between four interactivity modes: human, medium, message, and product. Second, it seeks to develop a framework of channel preferences that integrates the four‐mode concept of channel interactivity.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthesis of interactivity literature streaming from several disciplines (social psychology, computer science, communication, object interaction, and marketing) was used to develop the four‐mode concept. A framework is proposed to illustrate how consumers' perceptions of, and preferences for, the four interactivity modes impact channel preferences.

Findings

The propositions developed suggest: channels are perceived as offering different modes of interactivity; preferences for interactivity modes are shaped by personal and situational characteristics; and a match/mismatch between consumers' perceptions of and preferences for the interactivity modes determine channel preferences.

Research limitations/implications

The approach allows an evaluation of particular interactive technologies, an assessment of multi‐channel strategies, and an examination of consumers' satisfaction with their shopping experiences.

Originality/value

The authors propose a broader approach than existing ones. It is not restricted to an online channel; it integrates consumers' interaction with products; and it enables a comparison of online and offline channels. In addition, most research has focused on perceptions of interactivity whereas the framework presented in the paper addresses perceptions of, and preferences for, interactivity modes that impact channel choices.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2010

Tammy R. Kinley

The purpose of this study is to determine whether clothing benefits sought (CBS) affected fit preferences, satisfaction with the fit of ready‐to‐wear, label style…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine whether clothing benefits sought (CBS) affected fit preferences, satisfaction with the fit of ready‐to‐wear, label style preferences, and shopping behaviors of US women.

Design/methodology/approach

Written questionnaires were completed to determine the relationship between the CBS paradigm and the fit and shopping variables examined in the study. A larger study from which these findings are drawn involved behaviors related specifically to pants.

Findings

Responses on questionnaires from 150 women indicated four CBS factors: Fashion Forward, Sexy, Reputation, and Individualist. Study participants who desired Fashion Forward benefits preferred to shop in specialty stores and a tighter fit. Participants who sought Sexy benefits spent the most money on average, for a new pair of pants, preferred a tighter fit, clothing sized by waist dimension, and shopping in specialty stores. Participants who desired Reputation benefits from clothing shopped in specialty stores. Respondents who sought the Individualist benefits were more likely to shop via catalog/internet.

Research limitations/implications

Data were obtained from a convenience sample of women in a metropolitan area of the USA, thus generalization of results is limited.

Practical implications

In an overstored, highly competitive retail environment, the CBS paradigm will be useful in targeting product and product delivery. The findings indicate, however, that women who seek different benefits from their clothing do shop differently.

Originality/value

Results of the study will help one to better define markets according to an intuitively useful psychographic variable for which there has been limited research.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Jillian C. Sweeney and Fiona Wyber

This study extends the Mehrabian‐Russell environmental psychology model to include both emotional states and cognitive processing as mediators of the music‐intended…

Abstract

This study extends the Mehrabian‐Russell environmental psychology model to include both emotional states and cognitive processing as mediators of the music‐intended behavior relationship. Our model specifically suggests that music affects customers’ perceptions of service quality and merchandise quality as well as feelings of arousal and pleasure, in the context of a women’s fashion store. The effect of music on service quality has not previously received much attention. In addition, it has been suggested that previous results of studies examining the effect of music on consumer responses may have been largely the result of individual music tastes. In the present study, therefore, the effect of music tastes is also examined. Findings indicated that liking of music has a major effect on consumers’ evaluations (pleasure, arousal, service quality and merchandise quality), while the music characteristics (specifically slow pop or fast classical) have an additional effect on pleasure and service quality. Further, pleasure, service quality and merchandise quality affected intended approach behaviors, and arousal contributed to these behaviors when the store environment was considered pleasant. Affiliation behaviors similarly resulted from service quality, pleasure and arousal, but not merchandise quality. Overall results indicate the importance of understanding the effect of music on both consumers’ internal evaluations as well as intended behaviors.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Christina Boutsouki

Clustering is a highly popular and widely used tool for identifying data-based market segments. The purpose of this paper is to apply cluster analysis to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

Clustering is a highly popular and widely used tool for identifying data-based market segments. The purpose of this paper is to apply cluster analysis to identify homogeneous subgroups among impulse buyers based on their demographic characteristics and their preference of atmospheric elements.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey approach with 480 fashion consumers, the study discusses impulse purchases during financial crisis. SPSS process is used to determine the effect of atmospherics on impulse purchases as well as the moderating role of demographics. Cluster analysis (k-means method) is used to determine specific segments of impulsive consumption.

Findings

Despite a significant effect of atmospherics on consumers’ impulsiveness, the frequency of purchases is not significantly affected indicating that the economic environment may shape impulsive behavior. Gender, age and education seem to moderate the above relationship. Demographics and store atmospherics define specific segments of impulse buyers.

Research limitations/implications

The study identifies the clusters formed through the interaction of atmospherics with demographics. It further identifies the impact of atmospheric factors in the case of an economy in crisis. In times of financial hardship, store atmospherics, although appealing, do not seem to adequately promote impulse buying behavior. Understanding consumer’s impulsive behavior based on distinctive profiles is of outmost importance to retailers seeking to increase consumption, in particular under conditions of financial hardship.

Originality/value

The present study explores the role of environmental characteristics on consumers’ impulse behavior amidst a financial crisis and identifies the characteristics of specific segments of consumption.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2018

Rosy Boardman and Helen McCormick

The purpose of this paper is to provide a greater understanding of why and how different ages use shopping channels, analysing preferences and motivations for use.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a greater understanding of why and how different ages use shopping channels, analysing preferences and motivations for use.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with a sample of 50 female participants, aged 20-70. All were customers of a fashion retailer that has ecommerce and mcommerce platforms, stores and catalogues, in order to gain a better understanding of loyal consumers’ multi-channel behaviour.

Findings

Multi-channel shopping behaviour increased with age; the 20s did not engage in multi-channel shopping behaviour but viewed each channel as a separate entity. Mcommerce is the preferred shopping channel for the 20s, but its popularity and motivations to use decreases with age. Ecommerce is the most popular shopping channel due to convenience, selection, adventure/exploration and idea shopping. The physical store was the preferred channel for the 60+, who shopped there for convenience and enjoyment. Catalogues were seen as out-dated and no longer considered a transactional channel.

Originality/value

There are no previous studies that have investigated channel preferences and motivations across a 50-year age span using loyal customers. The majority of previous studies looking at multi-channel shopping behaviour are quantitative and so this qualitative enquiry provides a richer insight into reasons for consumer preferences and motivations. The study contributes novel findings to the literature as it shows that multi-channel shopping behaviour increases with age, and younger consumers (20s) are not partaking in it at all.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

J. Duncan Herrington

Reports the findings of a controlled field study examining the effects of background music on shopping behavior in a traditional service environment: a supermarket. Finds…

Abstract

Reports the findings of a controlled field study examining the effects of background music on shopping behavior in a traditional service environment: a supermarket. Finds that musical preference influenced both the amount of time and money shoppers spent in the service environment, although musical tempo and volume had no observable effects. Provides additional insight into the effects of background music on shopping behavior as well as some important considerations for the design of retail and service environments and ambience.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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