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1 – 10 of over 26000
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Alan Dick, Arun Jain and Paul Richardson

Using a sample of 872 shoppers and data for 14 products, tests the degree to which extrinsic cue reliance differs between “store brand” versus “non‐store brand” prone…

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Abstract

Using a sample of 872 shoppers and data for 14 products, tests the degree to which extrinsic cue reliance differs between “store brand” versus “non‐store brand” prone consumers. Results indicate that store brand prone consumers exhibit significantly less reliance on extrinsic cues in quality assessment. Reliance on brand name had an especially strong effect in forming taste expectations. Price reliance had a marked effect in determining perceptions of quality and reliability of ingredients. Discusses the implications for management.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Eidan Apelbaum, Eitan Gerstner and Prasad A. Naik

Investigates the extent to which expert evaluations of quality impact price premiums of national brands over the store brands. Using data from Consumer Reports, finds that…

5202

Abstract

Investigates the extent to which expert evaluations of quality impact price premiums of national brands over the store brands. Using data from Consumer Reports, finds that the average quality of store brands exceeds the average quality of national brands in 22 out of 78 product categories. Yet store brands typically do not charge price premiums, while national brands do (28.7 percent price premium on average). When national brands have higher quality, however, they increase the price premium from 28.7 percent to 50.4 percent on average. Regression analysis predicts that a national brand would command 37 percent price premium over a store brand that offers the same quality, a finding that highlights the handsome returns on building brand equity.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Ram Herstein and Eugene D. Jaffe

Store brands, which were once only found on the shelves of developed countries, are now being introduced in emerging markets in increasing amounts. The purpose of this

2840

Abstract

Purpose

Store brands, which were once only found on the shelves of developed countries, are now being introduced in emerging markets in increasing amounts. The purpose of this paper is to describe the store brand process as it is found in emerging markets. In doing so, the authors explain what are the forces that have led to the development of store brands in emerging markets and the sort of strategies that should be implemented.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides comparative statistics showing the penetration of store brands in both developed and emerging markets. Then, the conditions that determine whether store brands should be adopted by retailers are identified and discussed.

Findings

Five key factors have been identified that explain successful management approaches to introducing store brands in developed as compared to emerging markets. These include the number of store brand categories available, the quality of store brands, type of products, the manufacturers of the products and the number of product lines sold by retailers. Finally, the paper discusses the future of store brands in emerging markets and predicts that their penetration will closely follow the trend in developed countries.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights into what sort of strategies should be used by store managers in emerging markets to adopt store brands in order to satisfy the income levels of many of their customers. The use of store brands will not only provide more consumer satisfaction, but increased profits for the store.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Alan Dick, Arun Jain and Paul Richardson

Profiles heavy buyers of store brand products and compares themwith light buyers in terms of demographics, socio‐economic, andattitudinal variables. The results suggest…

4437

Abstract

Profiles heavy buyers of store brand products and compares them with light buyers in terms of demographics, socio‐economic, and attitudinal variables. The results suggest that younger, unmarried, and smaller sized households tend to avoid store brands. As compared with heavy buyers, light buyers of store brands are less familiar with them and perceive them to be of lower quality, less value for money and as riskier choices.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Praveen Aggarwal and Taihoon Cha

Sales and market share of storebrands have been growing significantly at the expense of national brands. The decision to purchasea store brand or a national brand has been…

2503

Abstract

Sales and market share of store brands have been growing significantly at the expense of national brands. The decision to purchase a store brand or a national brand has been modeled in this paper. The proposed model provides an explanation for the existence of asymmetric price competition between store brands and national brands. The article proposes and empirically demonstrates the existence of a reference threshold as the key criterion underlying this choice. It also shows that the decision to buy the store/national brand is not influenced by the store brand’s price or price promotions, or the magnitude of the difference between the threshold and the national brand’s price.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Serdar Sayman and Jagmohan S. Raju

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2011

Priscilla Y.L. Chan

China represents around 20% of the world's population, and her economy is still performing well under economic crisis. Historical events have shaped different parts of…

Abstract

China represents around 20% of the world's population, and her economy is still performing well under economic crisis. Historical events have shaped different parts of China with different economic developments and cultural encounters. The most prominent difference is between Hong Kong and the Mainland. This chapter would like to examine the development and issues of fashion retailing in China. For better understanding, this chapter starts with a brief discussion on apparel industry development and fashion culture in Hong Kong and the Mainland, follows by historical development and then presents systems of fashion retailing in both Hong Kong and the Mainland. Desktop research and exploratory research techniques were employed. Stores of international fashion luxury brands in Hong Kong, Shanghai and Beijing were visited. Comparison of branding issues, particularly for luxury market in Hong Kong and the Mainland are discussed, so are future directions of fashion retailing in these places.

Details

International Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-448-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2021

Ken Kumagai and Shin'ya Nagasawa

The study explores the influence of shopping channels on the hedonic shopping experience, contributing to subjective well-being (SWB) based on the purchased branded

Abstract

Purpose

The study explores the influence of shopping channels on the hedonic shopping experience, contributing to subjective well-being (SWB) based on the purchased branded product. It also assesses the variations in these effects according to brand luxury. The purpose of the paper is to provide strategic suggestions for building luxury apparel distribution tactics that balance maintaining brand luxury with business growth through both physical stores and digital stores (e-retail).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on 418 samples collected in Japan, consumers' perceptions of hedonic shopping value and SWB are examined according to two channel factors, such as physical retail vs e-retail and mono-brand stores vs multi-brand stores. Additionally, the moderation effects of brand luxury are discussed.

Findings

Multi-group path analyses reveal that physical mono-brand stores contribute to hedonic shopping value. In addition, this experiential value is found to increase SWB, especially when the brand luxury level is high.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that managers should place a high level of importance on consumers' shopping experiences via physical direct retail especially in the case of a higher luxury level, even in today's highly developed digital environment.

Originality/value

The current study uniquely discusses the effects of shopping channels and experiences on SWB based on an acquired branded product, i.e., an evaluation of the outcome of shopping behavior and product acquisition. The study also reinforces the importance of physical stores suggested in previous luxury research.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 34 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2021

Jae Youn Chang and Wi-Suk Kwon

This study aims at examining the role of the e-store brand personality congruence/incongruence of a multichannel apparel retailer in the formation of consumers' perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at examining the role of the e-store brand personality congruence/incongruence of a multichannel apparel retailer in the formation of consumers' perceived e-store brand fit and e-store patronage intention, based on the concept of image congruence.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted with a US national sample of 458 female consumers (20–50 years old) who had shopped for clothing online.

Findings

Results revealed that e-store brand personality incongruence in three personality dimensions had a negative impact on consumers' e-store patronage intention directly as well as indirectly by reducing the consumers' global perception of the e-store brand fit. Further, the retailer's relevance to the consumer moderated the relationship between the perceived e-store brand fit and e-store patronage intention in that this relationship was significantly greater among consumers with a high (vs low) perceived self-relevance of the retail brand.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the importance of symbolically integrated cross-channel brand management for multichannel apparel retailers by clearly identifying their brand personality and carefully crafting it into their e-store interface design and e-store visual merchandising to convey the brand personality.

Originality/value

This study expands the application of image congruence to the cross-channel image congruence phenomenon in multichannel retailing environments by examining the e-store brand image congruence employing both direct and indirect approaches.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Willem Verbeke, Paul Farris and Roy Thurik

The goal of this study was to gauge brand loyalty. To do this, a brand loyalty acid test was used, which involved an out‐of‐stock (OOS) experiment where the complete…

4009

Abstract

The goal of this study was to gauge brand loyalty. To do this, a brand loyalty acid test was used, which involved an out‐of‐stock (OOS) experiment where the complete product line of a brand was removed from several stores in order to estimate the OOS responses of consumers. Three types of OOS responses were identified: switching brands; switching stores to get one’s favorite brand; and postponing purchase of a specific brand. The present study revealed that the brand loyalty of the consumers participating in the OOS experiment was substantial, as a large percentage of them switched stores or postponed purchase. The study also showed that neither competitive conditions of the retailer nor assortment change had any effect on consumers’ OOS responses. The most potent variables that affected OOS responses were the way consumers organized their shopping trips: store loyals more than others switched stores by OOS; and consumers with a small purchase amount per shopping trip were less likely to switch stores and more likely to postpone purchase. There also was a slight tendency for the consumer to spend less in the store during the OOS period. This paper suggests the implications of these findings for retailers and manufacturers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 32 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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