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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

R.N. Butlin

Stone has been used as a structural material in the United Kingdom since mediaeval times, both in the form of dimension stone in the great cathedrals and, more recently…

Abstract

Stone has been used as a structural material in the United Kingdom since mediaeval times, both in the form of dimension stone in the great cathedrals and, more recently, in the form of cladding for modern office buildings. There is a range of indigenous building stone used in Britain ranging from granites, lime‐stones, sandstones and magnesian lime‐stones, to dolomitic sandstones, slates and others. Marbles are used extensively, but are mainly imported. The mediaeval cathedrals were in the main built from stone available from nearby quarries, eg Lincoln stone, Doulting stone (Wells Cathedral), but some of those quarries are almost worked out and alternative currently available sources of stone which is aesthetically and physically compatible with existing stone are constantly being sought.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

B.F. Miglio and B.J. Hunt

Discusses the problems associated with the staining anddiscoloration of stone used in building projects, based on theexperience of experts at Messrs Sandbergs, Consulting…

Abstract

Discusses the problems associated with the staining and discoloration of stone used in building projects, based on the experience of experts at Messrs Sandbergs, Consulting Engineers. Outlines the difference between staining and discoloration. Shows how marble, limestone, granite and sandstone are affected by discoloration, and continues by describing other problems unrelated to stone type – quarry problems, cutting and finishing, packing, transportation and storage, construction design and contamination. Details a variety of methods used to determine stain type and emphasizes the importance of obtaining specialist advice in dealing with the problem.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

T.A. Bailey and D.G. Ball MFB

Some historic observations With the exception of our prehistoric and primitive stone built ‘homes’ such as Chysauster and Cam Euny hut circles in Cornwall, the cromlechs…

Abstract

Some historic observations With the exception of our prehistoric and primitive stone built ‘homes’ such as Chysauster and Cam Euny hut circles in Cornwall, the cromlechs, dolmens and stone circles at Avebury and Stonehenge, it was the Romans who introduced fine and sturdy stone construction into our country. The Anglo‐Saxons left many fragments of their crudely dressed stone towers and chancels of their churches, which have survived due to their robust construction. The timber construction of the Dark Ages gave way to stone again and to the gradual establishment of the craft of the stonemason.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Eugene F. Stone-Romero and Dianna L. Stone

Individuals are often stigmatized by virtue of their status on various dimensions and as a consequence, they typically evoke negative cognitions, affect, and emotions…

Abstract

Individuals are often stigmatized by virtue of their status on various dimensions and as a consequence, they typically evoke negative cognitions, affect, and emotions among observers. In addition, they are often the targets of both access and treatment discrimination in organizations. Thus, we present a model of the cognitive, affective, and cultural influences on stigmatization in organizations, detail how stigmatization affects human resource management processes and practices, and consider strategies that can be used to reduce the problems faced by stigmatized individuals in organizations.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1432-4

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2019

Harvey A. Farberman

Gregory P. Stone (1921–1981) made original contributions to the fields of urban sociology, social psychology, sociology of sport, and sociological theory. His work gave…

Abstract

Gregory P. Stone (1921–1981) made original contributions to the fields of urban sociology, social psychology, sociology of sport, and sociological theory. His work gave rise to a set of empirically grounded concepts including nonranked status aggregates, personalization, universes of appearance, and personal and collective identity. These concepts developed over time, were based on quantitative research, and provide continuity to Stone’s work. This essay will elaborate on these concepts in order to consolidate and interpret Stone’s contribution to sociology.

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Celeste Jiménez de Madariaga

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how safeguarding intangible cultural heritage contributes to environmental conservation and favours sustainable development of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how safeguarding intangible cultural heritage contributes to environmental conservation and favours sustainable development of natural landscapes. To do so, the authors will focus on a study of dry stone constructions, which have been recognised by United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Design/methodology/approach

The research has been carried out through three methodologies: the search and review of archives (historical and administrative documents), ethnographic methodology (field work and interviews) and case studies.

Findings

The abandonment of dry stone constructions is placing rural zones at risk, as they assume a strategic role in environmental conservation efforts. This article seeks to highlight the importance of safeguarding this cultural heritage.

Research limitations/implications

The art of dry stone walling has its origins in ancient times and can be found in numerous regions around the world. The main ideas of this paper may be applied to many of the places where this vernacular architecture can be found.

Practical implications

Some stakeholders may apply the results of this study to identify new uses for heritage resources that allow maintenance of ecosystems while at the same time safeguarding intangible cultural heritage.

Social implications

This paper stresses the importance of raising public awareness of cultural heritage and vernacular architecture, its link with traditional activities such as farming and livestock raising, the rural landscape and reinforcement of cultural identity and historical memory.

Originality/value

This study illustrates the actions taken by UNESCO to safeguard intangible cultural heritage and the effects of those actions. It also considers dry stone constructions from the perspective of environmental sustainability, an area that has been subject to limited study.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Lisa Jack and Ahmed Kholeif

The aim of this paper is to present a reinforced version of structuration theory, known as strong structuration theory, set out in Stones as a disciplined approach to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present a reinforced version of structuration theory, known as strong structuration theory, set out in Stones as a disciplined approach to qualitative case study research in the organization, management and accounting fields. This framework challenges the belief held by certain critics that structuration theory cannot be used in substantive empirical research but is only a sensitising device or analytical tool.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual discussion is the approach of the paper.

Findings

The key concepts of strong structuration theory are outlined and then put in the context first of two attempts to apply the framework to empirical research and second of two recent papers which address theoretically informed qualitative research and the use of structuration theory in IT studies.

Research limitations/implications

There are some limitations of this paper. The framework offered was not used to set the original research questions in the two case studies employed as these cases were conducted before the publication of Stones' book in 2005. Also, as weaknesses in the framework can best be assessed using empirical findings, a full evaluation cannot be carried out until such research is undertaken.

Originality/value

This paper draws on recent research and thinking in sociology that have yet to be brought into case studies in the fields of accounting and management in particular.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2018

Michel Soto Chalhoub

Preservation of historic structures meets ecological criteria of sustainable development. In Mount Lebanon, the traditional house is a cultural asset built of native stone

Abstract

Purpose

Preservation of historic structures meets ecological criteria of sustainable development. In Mount Lebanon, the traditional house is a cultural asset built of native stone one-meter thick double-wythe walls. Today, lack of public policies is causing those environmental assets to approach extinction. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology uses multivariate regression on 128 data points. A mathematical model is developed and empirically tested on public attitudes toward restoration. Independent variables represent the need for protectionist policies, X1; contribution of restoration to environmental sustainability, X2; contribution to culture, X3; and financial benefits, X4.

Findings

It is found that stone houses transfer heat significantly slower than modern construction. There is a statistically significant and positive correlation with X1, X2, and X3, but negative with X4, most likely due to favoring return on investment of multistory buildings over the attractiveness of stone houses.

Research limitations/implications

As future research implications, the undergirding of urban planning policies need to be revisited. Current policies neither protect heritage, nor offer legal means to restore heritage houses.

Practical implications

Practical implications include revisions to building laws in Mount Lebanon, as they marginalize old stone structures. Environmental valuation techniques, use value and existence value, are recommended.

Social implications

Social awareness needs to be built about valuation techniques to account for complex assets that cannot be approximated through short-term real estate market price. Social rather than financial cost-benefit analysis must be performed to quantify environmental assets.

Originality/value

This research illustrates a pilot restoration project with critical issues faced by heritage stone houses. These assets are underrepresented in building laws which warrants social and environmental activism.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Jennifer L. Paschal, Dianna L. Stone and Eugene F. Stone‐Romero

The widespread use of electronic mail (e‐mail) at work has prompted a growing number of companies to implement e‐mail policies to protect both business interests and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The widespread use of electronic mail (e‐mail) at work has prompted a growing number of companies to implement e‐mail policies to protect both business interests and the privacy of employees. However, very little is known about the effects of such policies on such outcomes for employees such as perceived invasiveness and fairness. Thus, the paper aims to consider these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a 2×2 experimental design and a sample of 592 employed internet users to examine the effects of e‐mail policy characteristics (i.e. policy restrictiveness and policy justification) on perceptions of invasion of privacy (invasiveness) and fairness.

Findings

Results indicate that policy restrictiveness has effects on both invasiveness and fairness, and that policy justification has an effect on fairness. In addition, privacy values are related to both invasiveness and fairness, and moderated the effect of policy restrictiveness on fairness.

Practical implications

Implications for practice and the integration of organizational justice and organizational privacy theory are discussed. In terms of practice, for example, the study's results have implications for the formulation and enforcement of policies concerning the use of e‐mail systems.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to consider the effects of e‐mail policies on employee reactions (i.e. fairness and invasiveness).

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Steven Lockwood

Describes the geological distribution of Reigate Stone, a calcareoussandstone, and comments on its extraction in medieval times. Examinesits characteristics to explain its…

Abstract

Describes the geological distribution of Reigate Stone, a calcareous sandstone, and comments on its extraction in medieval times. Examines its characteristics to explain its popularity for carved work on many important historic buildings and advises on its identification. Explains the distribution of Reigate stone in buildings by reference to transport links and summarizes the results of archival and field investigations in a distribution map. Discusses the significance of chemical decay using examples from Surrey churches.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

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