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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Patrick Corrigan, Blythe Buchholz, Patrick J. Michaels and Sue McKenzie

Disclosure of mental illness is a key ingredient in contact-based public stigma change strategies. Adults who disclose their personal recovery story experience greater…

Abstract

Purpose

Disclosure of mental illness is a key ingredient in contact-based public stigma change strategies. Adults who disclose their personal recovery story experience greater empowerment and heightened quality of life. Qualitative research suggests youth may similarly benefit, but also have unique benefits and costs associated with disclosure. The purpose of this paper is to examine adults’ perceived costs and benefits of mental illness disclosure for middle and high school students with a new measure, the Coming Out with Mental Illness Scale for Children (COMIS-Child).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 300 adult participants from Amazon’s MTurk completed the COMIS-Child, the Beliefs about Disclosure Scale (BDS), assessing perceptions about child disclosure, and the Attribution Questionnaire, assessing public stigma.

Findings

Principal component analyses of the COMIS-Child yielded one factor representing disclosure costs and two factors for benefits (changing pubic stigma; person-defined benefits). Internal consistencies of the COMIS-Child factors were strong. Parents with children with mental illness endorsed more costs and fewer benefits from the changing public stigma factor than other respondents. Regression analyses showed decisions about youth disclosing mental illness from the BDS were associated with perceived costs, perceived benefits as personally defined, and public stigma. Disclosure beliefs were also inversely associated with public stigma.

Social implications

Adults who identify more costs and fewer benefits were less likely to believe youth should disclose, favoring a more conservative approach to youth disclosure. This highlights the importance of participating in self-stigma interventions that guide an individual’s decision making about disclosure.

Originality/value

To the author’s knowledge, this is the first study examining adults’ perceptions of youth disclosure of mental illness.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2022

Cheryl K. McIntosh, Shelia A. Hyde, Myrtle P. Bell and Paul E. Yeatts

The purpose of this study is to examine factors relating to the decision to proactively disclose a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine factors relating to the decision to proactively disclose a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a concealable stigmatized identity, before experiencing performance issues at work. These factors include stigma consciousness, psychological safety, and job demands. Proactive disclosure is also measured in relation to thriving.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through the online research platform Prolific. Variables of interest were measured using surveys of 166 working adults who have ADHD. Path analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The authors hypothesized that stigma consciousness is negatively related to proactive disclosure of ADHD at work and that psychological safety and job demands are positively related to it. The authors further hypothesized that proactive disclosure mediates the relationship between these variables and thriving at work. The results partially support these hypotheses, indicating that stigma consciousness is negatively related to proactive disclosure while psychological safety is positively related. Proactive disclosure fully mediates the relationship between stigma consciousness and thriving and partially mediates the relationship between psychological safety and thriving. Job demands relate to thriving but are not significantly related to proactive disclosure.

Practical implications

Organizations can help employees who have concealable disabilities to proactively disclose them and thrive by providing a psychologically safe environment where disabilities are not stigmatized.

Originality/value

This study diverges from previous studies by measuring positive contextual and individual factors that help employees who have ADHD to thrive in the workplace. A proactive disclosure scale is developed and validated.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 November 2020

Azad Shokri, Ghobad Moradi, Amjad Mohamadi Bolbanabad, Mitra Satary, Mahin Shabrandi, Parsa Sadeghkhani, Aram Mohammadi, Armin Ghorishi, Ronak Veisy, Arshad Veysi, Bakhtiar Piroozi, Shina Amiri Hoseini, Sonia Darvishi and Heshmatollah Asadi

The purpose of the study is to investigate the perceived stigma among residents of Sanandaj, west of Iran, following COVID-19 pandemic.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate the perceived stigma among residents of Sanandaj, west of Iran, following COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross-sectional study conducted from March to April 2020. The sample consisted of 1,000 participants who live in Sanandaj. The data collection tool was a self-report electronic questionnaire. ANOVA and T-test were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The mean perceived stigma for COVID-19 was 5.50±2.24 (IQR: 3.75–6.87) out of 10-point scale. The highest point was seen for perceived external stigma (6.73±2.49, IQR: 5–8.75) followed by disclosure stigma (4.95±3.92, IQR: 0–10). Interestingly, self-employers were more concerned about disclosing their illness than those with governmental jobs (25±3.93 vs. 4.31±4.14, P<0.05), and also had an overall higher stigma score; 5.72±2.23 vs. 5.19±2.37, P<0.05).

Originality/value

COVID-19 stigma is high among Iranians and more common among men, youngsters and self-employers.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2022

Sylvanna Mirichlis, Penelope Hasking, Stephen P. Lewis and Mark E. Boyes

Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with psychological disorders and suicidal thoughts and behaviours; disclosure of NSSI can serve as a catalyst for…

Abstract

Purpose

Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with psychological disorders and suicidal thoughts and behaviours; disclosure of NSSI can serve as a catalyst for help-seeking and self-advocacy amongst people who have self-injured. This study aims to identify the socio-demographic, NSSI-related, socio-cognitive and socio-emotional correlates of NSSI disclosure. Given elevated rates of NSSI amongst university students, this study aimed to investigate these factors amongst this population.

Design/methodology/approach

Australian university students (n = 573) completed online surveys; 80.2% had previously disclosed self-injury.

Findings

NSSI disclosure was associated with having a mental illness diagnosis, intrapersonal NSSI functions, specifically marking distress and anti-dissociation, having physical scars from NSSI, greater perceived impact of NSSI, less expectation that NSSI would result in communication and greater social support from friends and significant others.

Originality/value

Expanding on previous works in the area, this study incorporated cognitions about NSSI. The ways in which individuals think about the noticeability and impact of their NSSI, and the potential to gain support, are associated with the decision to disclose self-injury. Addressing the way individuals with lived experience consolidate these considerations could facilitate their agency in whether to disclose their NSSI and highlight considerations for health-care professionals working with clients who have lived experience of NSSI.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Sally Hemming, Hilary McDermott, Fehmidah Munir and Kim Burton

Long-term health conditions are a significant occupational and global burden and can undermine people's ability to work. Workplace support for self-management of long-term…

Abstract

Purpose

Long-term health conditions are a significant occupational and global burden and can undermine people's ability to work. Workplace support for self-management of long-term conditions has the potential to minimise adverse work effects, by enhancing health and work outcomes. No data exist about employers' views concerning supporting workers with long-term conditions to self-manage.

Design/methodology/approach

The exploration of employers' views involved recruiting 15 participants with responsibilities for workplace health, well-being and safety responsibilities, who participated in a semi-structured interview about self-management and support. Data were analysed using a qualitative six-stage thematic analysis technique.

Findings

Self-management support is not purposely provided to workers with long-term conditions. Support in any form rests on workers disclosing a condition and on their relationship with their line-manager. While employers have considerable control over people's ability to self-manage, they consider that workers are responsible for self-management at work. Stigma, work demands and line-manager behaviours are potential obstacles to workers' self-management and support.

Practical implications

Workplace discussions about self-managing long-term conditions at work should be encouraged and opened up, to improve health and work outcomes and aligned with return-to-work and rehabilitation approaches. A wider biopsychosocial culture could help ensure workplaces are regarded as settings in which long-term conditions can be self-managed.

Originality/value

This study highlights that employer self-management support is not provided to workers with long-term conditions in a purposeful way. Workplace support depends on an employer knowing what needs to be supported which, in turn, depends on aspects of disclosure, stigma, work demands and line management.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Lindsay R.L. Larson and Dora Elizabeth Bock

Recent evidence on consumer decision-making suggests that highly complex choice scenarios lead consumers to use simplistic decision heuristics, often resulting in…

1135

Abstract

Purpose

Recent evidence on consumer decision-making suggests that highly complex choice scenarios lead consumers to use simplistic decision heuristics, often resulting in suboptimal decision-making. This study aims to investigate the relationships among consumers’ primary information source, patient satisfaction and patient well-being, specifically focused on the search for mental health professionals. The selection of a mental health provider is of interest, because practitioners work from a highly diverse set of theoretical bases, may hold a wide range of different credentials and provide drastically different therapeutic approaches, therefore making the selection complex and difficult for consumers to self-navigate.

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies were undertaken, with data sampling from both patients of mental health services and practitioners.

Findings

Consumers selecting a provider based on self-performed searches, rather than receiving external input (referrals from physicians, relatives or friends), report lower satisfaction with their mental health provider. In turn, patient satisfaction positively impacts patient well-being. Practitioner data corroborate these findings, revealing that a large percentage of patients stem from a self-performed internet search, though mental health providers recognize that external referrals are likely to lead to better outcomes.

Originality/value

The results reveal the importance of understanding the consumer search and, particularly, the use of the internet as a search tool. The results present several implications for service providers, including the need to identify patients’ primary source utilized within an information search, as it can adversely impact patient satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2022

Ian Ruthven

Abstract

Details

Dealing With Change Through Information Sculpting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-047-7

Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Nicole C. Jones Young and Ann Marie Ryan

The purpose of this paper is to summarize some of the key gaps in knowledge regarding the use of criminal records in employee selection and post-hire challenges that those…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarize some of the key gaps in knowledge regarding the use of criminal records in employee selection and post-hire challenges that those with a criminal record may continue to face.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a general review and introduction to the special issue on criminal history and employment.

Findings

The authors suggest that understanding the “what,” “how,” “why” and “who” may provide researchers with increased clarity regarding the relevance and use of criminal records within the employee selection process.

Research limitations/implications

The authors encourage researchers to explore the management constructs and theories to understand how they may operate and affect this population upon entry into the workplace. Additionally, the authors discuss some of the methodological challenges and considerations related to conducting research on this population.

Originality/value

While researchers continue to seek and better understand the experiences of job seekers with criminal records and specific barriers to fulfilling work, there are many aspects of the pre- and post-employment experience that are not yet well examined. This paper provides a pathway forward for management researchers within the area of criminal history and employment, an understudied yet relevant topic.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Angella Napakol, Samuel Kazibwe, Ann Mugunga, Elizabeth Kitego, Osborn Ahimbisibwe and Joseph Kiva

In the midst of a public health crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic, journalists play an important role of sharing information of consequence with the public. As first…

Abstract

In the midst of a public health crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic, journalists play an important role of sharing information of consequence with the public. As first responders to precarious events, they work in close proximity to the threat they are reporting on yet at the same time struggle with other personal and professional responsibilities which are strenuous on their mental health. This chapter qualitatively interrogated journalists in order to understand their experiences with mental health during COVID-19 and how they worked through personal and social acceptability, biases and stigma as well as diagnosis. Of importance as well was to understand how they disclose, if they disclose at all, mental health issues and the different copying mechanisms. Findings show that journalists have a textbook but not applicable understanding of mental health, declaring that they many of them have experienced mental disorders without knowing. The consequences of COVID-19 measures such as layoffs, increased workload, inconsiderate media houses, brutality from law enforcement agencies were key contributors to mental health stresses. Journalists with supportive families seemed to have coped better while some buried themselves in multiple jobs to circumvent the stress that comes with financial privation.

Details

COVID-19 and the Media in Sub-Saharan Africa: Media Viability, Framing and Health Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-272-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Jennifer Oates and Rasiha Hassan

The purpose of this paper is to explore occupational health (OH) clinicians’ perspectives on employee mental health in the mental health workplace in the English National…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore occupational health (OH) clinicians’ perspectives on employee mental health in the mental health workplace in the English National Health Service.

Design/methodology/approach

Thematic analysis of data from seven semi-structured interviews is performed in this paper.

Findings

Three themes emerged under the core theme of “Situating OH services”: “the Uniqueness of the mental health service setting”, “the Limitations of OH services” and “the Meaning of mental health at work”. An important finding came from the first theme that management referrals in mental health may be due to disputes about workers’ fitness to face violence and aggression, a common feature of their working environment.

Research limitations/implications

This was a small scale study of a previously unresearched population.

Practical implications

These findings should be used to refine and standardise OH provision for mental healthcare workers, with a particular focus on exposure to violence and workers’ potential “lived experience” of mental illness as features of the mental health care workplace.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore OH clinicians’ perspectives on the mental health service working environment.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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