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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Lars Grønholdt, Anne Martensen, Stig Jørgensen and Peter Jensen

– The purpose of this paper is to examine how essential dimensions of customer experience management (CEM) drive business performance in Danish companies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how essential dimensions of customer experience management (CEM) drive business performance in Danish companies.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study is conducted to investigate the relationships between seven CEM dimensions, differentiation, market performance and financial performance. The conceptual model is operationalized by a structural equation model, and the model is estimated and tested by using the partial least squares method. A survey among 484 companies in Denmark forms the empirical basis for the study.

Findings

The findings provide evidence that the seven CEM dimensions influence differentiation, market performance and financial performance. High-performing companies differ significantly from low-performing companies with regard to how they master the CEM, meaning that those companies which incorporate superior customer experience into their products and service enjoy measurable financial success.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to the seven identified CEM dimensions in Danish companies.

Practical implications

This study has clear implications in terms of identifying and measuring the importance of essential CEM dimensions which influence business performance. The results can help companies to understand CEM and develop CEM strategies.

Originality/value

The paper provides a deeper insight into CEM and how CEM works.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Adam Lindgreen

Few published empirical studies have examined the design, implementation, and monitoring of customer relationship management (CRM) programmes at a practical level. The…

Abstract

Few published empirical studies have examined the design, implementation, and monitoring of customer relationship management (CRM) programmes at a practical level. The article develops a single embedded case study on Dagbladet Børsen (http://www.borsen.dk), the largest publisher of business‐related materials in Scandinavia. The article first introduces the reader to the philosophy behind CRM. Following that, it considers key areas of a four‐year long CRM programme and offer insights into the procedure that has been developed by SJP (http://www.sjp.dk), the consulting firm that was brought in to assist. The procedure is organized around eight areas: commitment of senior management, situation report, analysis, strategy formulation, implementation, management development, employee involvement, and evaluation of loyalty‐building processes. Over the four‐year long CRM programme, Dagbladet Børsen increased its newspaper circulation by 40 per cent and advertising revenue by 50 per cent, while total revenue more than doubled.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Lars Grønholdt and Anne Martensen

The purpose of this paper is to examine how different management practices drive key financial performance and business success in Danish companies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how different management practices drive key financial performance and business success in Danish companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Both qualitative and quantitative research is conducted to study the relationships between eight general management practices and key performance results. A survey among large companies in Denmark and the companies' key performance results form the empirical basis for the study. Two central key performance results are “increase in turnover” and “return on invested capital”. It can be argued that sustained increase in turnover and high return on invested capital at the same time indicate business success and return to shareholders in the long run.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that the eight management practices are linked to key performance results. The high‐performing companies are differentiated significantly from the low‐performing companies with regard to how well they perform on these management practices. All eight management practices are essential in achieving business success.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to eight identified management practices in large Danish companies.

Practical implications

The study has clear implications in terms of identifying and measuring the importance of essential management practices, which influence key performance results, and thereby separate facts from fads.

Originality/value

The study identifies and measures eight essential management practices and links these to actual key performance results.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2010

Michael Søgaard Jørgensen, Ulrik Jørgensen, Kåre Hendriksen, Stig Hirsbak, Henrik Holmlund Thomsen and Nils Thorsen

The purpose of this paper is to analyse environmental responsibility of companies from industrialized countries when they source materials and products in countries with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse environmental responsibility of companies from industrialized countries when they source materials and products in countries with less environmental protection.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a study of corporate environmental management in the Danish textile and clothing sector, with 13 cases based on interviews and material from reports and websites. The criteria for choosing the cases were variety of size and market segment, and a mixture of companies that take environmental initiatives and companies for which it was not known whether they take environmental initiatives.

Findings

Several different environmental practices were identified: some companies were early which got sustained initiatives, and some early and not sustained initiatives; some companies were late with sustained initiatives, and some late and not sustained initiatives; and finally, some have a practice without environmental initiatives. Dominating types of initiatives are cleaner technology, environmental management systems and cleaner products. Driving forces are governmental regulation, customer demands, market expectations and protection of corporate brands. Some companies focus on capacity building at the suppliers in developing countries, while other companies seem to focus the complex activities at domestic suppliers. Two new facilitating actors in environmental management in product chains were identified.

Research limitations/implications

The focus on one sector in one country limits the number of variables in the analysis. It enables comparisons among the analysed companies, but limits the possibilities for comparison across sectors and countries.

Originality/value

The paper has value as a study of the development of environmental management in a number of companies within the same sector over a number of years, whereby changes in management focus and the embedding of initiatives can be analysed.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2016

Sunday Olayinka Oyedepo, Richard Olayiwola Fagbenle, Samuel Sunday Adefila and Md Mahbub Alam

This study aims to use an environomics method to assess the environmental impacts of selected gas turbine power plants in Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to use an environomics method to assess the environmental impacts of selected gas turbine power plants in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, exergoenvironomic analysis has been carried out to investigate the environmental impact of selected gas turbine power plants in Nigeria from an exergetic point of view.

Findings

The exergy analysis reveals that the combustion chamber is the most exergy destructive component compared to other cycle components. The exergy destruction of this component can be reduced by increasing gas turbine inlet temperature (GTIT). The results of the study show that thermodynamic inefficiency is responsible for the environmental impact associated with gas turbine components. The study further shows that CO2 emissions and cost of environmental impact decrease with increasing GTIT.

Originality/value

The exergo-environomic parameters computed in this study are CO2 emission in kg per MWh of electricity generated, depletion number, sustainability index, cost flow rate of environmental impacts (Ċenv) in $/h and total cost rates of products (ĊTot) in $/hr. For the period considered, the CO2 emissions for the selected plants vary from 100.18 to 408.78 kgCO2/MWhm, while cost flow rate of environmental impacts varies from $40.18 /h to $276.97 /h and the total cost rates of products vary from $2935.69/h to $12,232.84/h. The depletion number and sustainability index vary from 0.69 to 0.84 and 1.20 to 1.44, respectively.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Anne Benedicte Juul, Christian Gluud, Jørn Wetterslev, Torben Callesen, Gorm Jensen and Allan Kofoed‐Enevoldsen

To examine the availability and quality of clinical guidelines on perioperative diabetes care in hospital units before and after a randomised clinical trial (RCT) and…

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the availability and quality of clinical guidelines on perioperative diabetes care in hospital units before and after a randomised clinical trial (RCT) and international accreditation.

Design/methodology/approach

Interventional “before‐after” study in 51 units (38 surgical and 13 anaesthetic) in nine hospitals participating in a RCT in the greater Copenhagen area; 27 of the units also underwent international accreditation.

Findings

The proportion of units with guidelines increased from 24/51 (47 percent) units before to 38/51 (75 percent) units after the trial. Among the 27 units without guidelines before the trial, significantly more accredited units compared to non‐accredited units had a guideline after the trial (9/10 (90 percent) compared to 5/17 (29 percent). The quality of the systematic development scale and the clinical scales improved significantly after the trial in both accredited units (both p<0.001) and in non‐accredited units (both p<0.02). The improvement of the systematic development scale was significantly higher in accredited than in non‐accredited units (p<0.01).

Originality/value

The combination of conducting both the DIPOM Trial and international accreditation led to a significant improvement of both dissemination and quality of guidelines on perioperative diabetic care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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