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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Marja Sofie Lundgren

The purpose of this paper is to propose building code changes that would benefit both architectural design and the potential of achieving nearly zero energy goals by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose building code changes that would benefit both architectural design and the potential of achieving nearly zero energy goals by analyzing the architectural implications of the energy system boundaries within the Swedish code.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is driven by three questions that relate the national implementation of EU directive on nearly zero energy 2020 to the premises set out in the guidelines for revising the Swedish building code aiming at a performance-based regulation. A crucial part of the research is a comparative analysis of the design implications of the code to research findings in scientific articles on near-zero energy or low-energy design.

Findings

The energy system boundaries in the Swedish code are steering the architectural design and energy consequences of offices towards using less heat but more electricity. The energy section is also limiting the architectural design choices by ignoring the positive energy aspects of daylight. A proposal of a new comprehensive energy section taking all architectural design related energy aspects into account is presented, in order to support design of nearly zero energy buildings.

Practical implications

A building code that relates the energy system boundaries to form will help integrated design choices that are more likely to support the strive towards nearly zero energy buildings.

Originality/value

The paper reveals the design implication of the Swedish energy section to be counterproductive regarding energy efficiency as well as limiting architectural design choices.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2013

Ronald J. Berger, Carla Corroto, Jennifer Flad and Richard Quinney

Medical uncertainty is recognized as a critical issue in the sociology of diagnosis and medical sociology more generally, but a neglected focus of this concern is the…

Abstract

Medical uncertainty is recognized as a critical issue in the sociology of diagnosis and medical sociology more generally, but a neglected focus of this concern is the question of patient decision making. Using a mixed methods approach that draws upon autoethnographic accounts and third-party interviews, we aim to illuminate the dilemmas of patient decision making in the face of uncertainty. How do patients and supportive caregivers go about navigating this state of affairs? What types of patient–doctor/healthcare professional relationships hinder or enhance effective patient decision making? These are the themes we explore in this study by following patients through the sequence of experiencing symptoms, seeking a diagnosis, evaluating treatment protocols, and receiving treatments. In general, three genres of culturally available narratives are revealed in the data: strategic, technoluxe, and unbearable health narratives.

Details

40th Anniversary of Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-783-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1990

Steven Goldberg

Suppose, for argument's sake, that I am a racist. Suppose that my psychology, my economics, and my politics are predicated on an irrational hatred of Oriental peoples…

Abstract

Suppose, for argument's sake, that I am a racist. Suppose that my psychology, my economics, and my politics are predicated on an irrational hatred of Oriental peoples. Finally, suppose that, in the service of my psychological, economic, and political needs, I claim that the peoples of the Orient are shorter than the people of the United States and that they are so for genetic reasons. Would the irrationality of my needs cast doubt on the correctness of my claim?

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 10 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Abstract

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Recognising Students who Care for Children while Studying
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-672-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

William J. Lundstrom, Oscar W. Lee and D. Steven White

Considers the factors which influence Taiwanese decisions to buy Japanese or US refrigerators, basing the conclusions on the results of a survey of 586 respondents drawn…

Abstract

Considers the factors which influence Taiwanese decisions to buy Japanese or US refrigerators, basing the conclusions on the results of a survey of 586 respondents drawn from Taiwan’s four largest cities – Taipei, Kaoshiung, Taichung and Tainan. Describes how the questionnaires were constructed and pretested, and explains how the data was recorded (using a 5‐point Likert‐type scale) and analysed (using factor analysis and t‐tests). Tests particularly for cultural values of the Chinese, consumer ethnocentrism, openness to foreign culture, country image, and consumer sophistication. Finds that, despite the longer presence of Japanese goods in Taiwan, Japan’s proximity to Taiwan, and more cultural similarities between the Japanese and Taiwanese, Taiwanese consumers rate the USA’s country image factor higher than Japan’s, with consequent implications regarding intention to buy US goods. Recommends that US marketers build on their advantageous country image when they promote US appliances in foreign markets. Cautions against making too much of this snapshot data but concedes that further research into different foreign markets, different appliances, and with a longitudinal approach, would ascertain if findings are consistent with this survey, which has obvious benefits as new markets, such as China and India, open up to western goods and appliances.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2011

Kenneth R. White, Steven Thompson and John R. Griffith

Substantial and sustained change is inevitable for U.S. hospitals, driven by the Medicare and Medicaid cost inflation curve and embodied in regulatory initiatives and…

Abstract

Substantial and sustained change is inevitable for U.S. hospitals, driven by the Medicare and Medicaid cost inflation curve and embodied in regulatory initiatives and reforms. This study explores the conception that evidence-based management is necessary but not sufficient for 21st century success in health care organizations. Success will require challenging and changing the organization's dominant logic, substituting a more transformational style of problem analysis and decision making. In order for evidence-based management decisions to transform organizations, the organizational culture must be ready to adopt transformation changes. The outcomes of this shift in management style are dramatic changes in worker engagement and retention and a reinforcing cycle of performance improvement efforts. We use a series of examples to illustrate changes in the dominant logic and to identify how the combination of evidence-based management and a new dominant logic results in a fundamental and highly productive shift in how problems are framed and solved. We conclude with recommendations for changing the dominant logic – such as visioning, sensemaking, process questioning, getting the right people together, rewarding innovation, and overcoming risk aversion – all necessary for transforming the dominant logic, allowing evidence-based management techniques to flourish.

Details

Biennial Review of Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-714-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Rajshekhar Javalgi, Bob D. Cutler and D. Steven White

Investigates the regional standardization issue in global advertising bycomparing print advertising of the Pacific Basin countries of Japan,Taiwan and South Korea. The…

Abstract

Investigates the regional standardization issue in global advertising by comparing print advertising of the Pacific Basin countries of Japan, Taiwan and South Korea. The findings of the study reveal similarities and differences in print advertising components across the countries. Similarities were identified with respect to the use of photographs, the number of products shown per advertisement, the use of symbolic appeals, the use of product association and the use of product comparison appeals. However, the number of differences between the countries casts doubt on the extent of regional standardization that is feasible.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2003

Jonathan L Gifford

Abstract

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Flexible Urban Transportation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-050656-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Wei Xie and Steven White

This paper aims to consolidate prior research from policy and management domains to identify stages in China's technological learning within the imitation paradigm during…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consolidate prior research from policy and management domains to identify stages in China's technological learning within the imitation paradigm during 1949‐2001, focusing on changes in the government's strategic priorities and policies and the nature, mode and sources of technological learning, then to contrast the firm and institutional features that have emerged under the imitation paradigm with those defining the emerging creation paradigm. The analysis leads to clear implications for both policy and management for the Chinese firms to make this transition and compete in higher value‐added global industries.

Design/methodology/approach

An overview and conceptual paper based on observations and literature review.

Findings

This paper derives a parsimonious set of four dimensions to demarcate five stages in the evolution of China's technological learning: the government's strategic priority, nature of technology, the mode and the source of learning. It identifies six factors acting as significant impediments to Chinese firms' transition from imitation to creation.

Originality/value

In the first place, this paper provides managerial implications which are of great interest to Chinese practicing managers to manage their firms' transition from imitation to creation; second, the policy imperatives highlighted by this paper will help Chinese policymakers to design appropriate incentive mechanisms to enable Chinese firms to build up their competitiveness within the creation paradigm and thereby become global competitors. Meanwhile, this paper provides a systematic analysis on the evolution of China's technology development. This five stage‐based framework will help practicing managers in China understand whether, which and when Chinese firms can make the transition necessary to compete based on the creation of proprietary resources and capabilities.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2010

Janice Witt Smith and Stephanie E. Joseph

This article aims to provide a qualitative analysis of the diversity management challenges of professionals in corporate America. A specific focus is on the differential…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to provide a qualitative analysis of the diversity management challenges of professionals in corporate America. A specific focus is on the differential outcomes of women and ethnic minorities and their equal employment opportunities in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examined the workplace experiences of 42 African‐American and Caucasian men and women in corporate America. Semi‐structured interviews were held to discover diversity management issues unique to these groups.

Findings

It was found that challenges supported a priori assertions of organizational culture, discrimination/stereotyping, and human capital investments. Each of these challenges impacted members in qualitatively different ways that may account for the variability in work experiences and outcomes. While there were some consistent themes, the findings demonstrated significant within race and between gender differences.

Research limitations/implications

Qualitative studies provide in‐depth information and a deeper understanding about phenomena which allows one to capture general themes that can be obscured in survey research. The intersection of race and gender provides unique findings that should be considered in future research. The use of self‐reported perceptual data without triangulation can limit the generalizability of the study but does provide a view in the language and emotion of the individual who is sharing his/her workplace experience.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate that diversity management practices need to consider race, gender, as well as multiple group memberships (e.g. African‐American women) which reveals unique issues to be addressed within organizational contexts. There are also differences within race, by gender, in the ways that individuals experience the workplace. The findings provide insight for managers to aid in diversity management and retention.

Social implications

Race is socially constructed and has a political rather than biological basis for determining it. Racial categories in one country which limit an individual's power, influence, freedom, and clout may be very different than categories in another country or political context. Because race is socially constructed, individuals may increase or lose power, privilege, influence and status as they move from one sociopolitical context/power structure in one country to another.

Originality/value

This research provides an additional lens through which to examine the workplace experiences of women and minorities to aid managers in deriving the maximum benefit in a diverse, well‐qualified labor force.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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