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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Steven Si, Song Wang and Steven M. Welch

This study aims to investigate how firm capability can be accumulated with the inputs of learning efforts targeted at resolving barriers existing in the imitative…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how firm capability can be accumulated with the inputs of learning efforts targeted at resolving barriers existing in the imitative innovation process. This paper takes imitative innovation as a process involving a few stages during which learning efforts are targeted at overcoming barriers existing within each process.

Design/methodology/approach

The multiple case study approach has been adopted to explore how Chinese manufacturing small and medium enterprises (SMEs) learn and increase their technological capabilities through a continuous process of product refinement and improvement based on imitative innovation. In particular, the authors accentuate the learning efforts that firms must make to cope with various technological barriers

Findings

It is revealed that during the initial stages of imitative innovation, the organizational learning of Chinese manufacturing SMEs is highly constrained by the limitations of their technological resources and capabilities. It is also found that original equipment manufacturers can play an important role in providing Chinese learners with both explicit and tacit technological knowledge.

Originality/value

This study investigates how firm capability can be accumulated with the inputs of learning efforts targeted at resolving barriers existing in the imitative innovation process. The multiple case study approach has been adopted to explore how Chinese manufacturing SMEs learn and increase their technological capabilities through a continuous process of product refinement and improvement based on imitative innovation that could add new and great value to this research area.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Ying Fu and Steven Si

This paper aims to focus on a special group of people in family firms in China, the second generation who are returnees, and to study their impact on family ownership and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on a special group of people in family firms in China, the second generation who are returnees, and to study their impact on family ownership and corporate entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from China’s private enterprises in 2015 were used to test the hypotheses. Data were collected through a joint effort by the China Federation of Industry and Commerce and the School of Management of Zhejiang University. The authors used a stratified sampling method, and questionnaires were distributed to 12 provinces in East, Central and West China. Two sets of questionnaires were distributed and answered.

Findings

Compared with those family firms without second-generation returnees, the relationship between family ownership and corporate entrepreneurship is significantly enhanced in family firms that have second-generation returnees. Furthermore, compared with the second-generation returnees who stay overseas for a short time, returnees who stay overseas longer are more likely to promote corporate entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

This study explores the unique characteristics of second-generation returnees and explores these returnees’ impact on family ownership and corporate entrepreneurship in the Chinese context. This could generate a new value to the family entrepreneurship literature.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Song Lin and Steven Si

The purpose of this paper is to investigate exploration and exploitation as antecedents to speed of internationalization in born global firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate exploration and exploitation as antecedents to speed of internationalization in born global firms.

Design/methodology/approach

By using 150 born global firms in China, the authors demonstrate that the influence of exploration and exploitation on born globals’ speed of internationalization. The statistical method in this study is hierarchical regression model.

Findings

The results revealed that exploration has a negative effect on the internationalization of born global firms, whereas exploration does not. The interaction between exploration and exploitation has positive influence on born globals’ speed of internationalization.

Practical implications

The study helps entrepreneurs and managers to better understand how to achieve international entrepreneurship success and internationalization success.

Originality/value

This study makes a theoretical development of internationalization speed, a core aspect of international entrepreneurship theory. First, this study contributes to theories on born globals’ speed of internationalization, which the authors redefined in the current study by using two approaches to measure the speed of internationalization of born global firms. Second, the study used exploration and exploitation as the two designated factors that are supposed to affect the speed of internationalization of born globals which contributes to the theoretical literature of international opportunity.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Steven X. Si and John B. Cullen

The present study investigated whether questionnaires using explicit midpoints produce different results for different cultural groups. We hypothesized that managers from…

Abstract

The present study investigated whether questionnaires using explicit midpoints produce different results for different cultural groups. We hypothesized that managers from China, Japan, and Hong Kong (CJH) respond differently to Western management scales than do managers from the US., Germany, and United Kingdom (UGU). We found differences in central tendency (the likelihood of choosing the midpoint in overall variance between these groups). Using scales with even numbered response categories (thus removing the explicit midpoint) decreases the central tendencies of the CJH group and increases the variance in the responses to Western management questionnaire. Results suggested that when survey questionnaires are used in CJH cultures, careful consideration should be given to the choice between scales with even‐numbered response categories and those with odd‐numbered response categories.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2020

Renhuai Liu, Steven Si, Song Lin, Dean Tjosvold and Richard Posthuma

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International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 25 March 2020

Steven Si, Hui Chen, Wan Liu and Yushan Yan

The purpose of this study is to connect disruptive innovation and sharing economy by exploring the underlying mechanisms of how a disruptive innovation–based business…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to connect disruptive innovation and sharing economy by exploring the underlying mechanisms of how a disruptive innovation–based business project creates, delivers and captures value in sharing economy through analyzing the case of bike sharing in China.

Design/methodology/approach

An elaborate case study is used to unfold the process as well as the underlying mechanism and relationships among disruptive innovation, business model, bike-sharing business and value creation in sharing economy.

Findings

Bike sharing case fits well in disruptive innovation theory. Its low price and great convenience have led to rapid development in China. However, failures to improve their products and services and build an effective business model which can create, deliver and capture value have caused the failure of many bike-sharing companies. Other factors such as strategic decision-making, internal management problems, external conflicts as well as uncivilized consumer behaviors have also inhibited the sustainable development of bike-sharing companies.

Originality/value

The theoretical contributions of this study include the following: to explore how a disruptive innovation–based business creates, delivers and captures value successfully in sharing economy. This study contributes to both research and practice on disruptive innovation and sharing economy.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

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Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Stéphane Brutus and Elizabeth F. Cabrera

This study investigates the relationship between personal values and feedback‐seeking behaviors. Feedbackseeking behaviors, or the way by which individuals in…

Abstract

This study investigates the relationship between personal values and feedback‐seeking behaviors. Feedbackseeking behaviors, or the way by which individuals in organizations actively seek information about their performance, has recently become an important research topic in the management literature. However, the large majority of this research has been conducted in the United States. This study aims to test the relationships between the personal values of a multinational sample and feedback‐seeking behaviors. An integrated set of hypotheses regarding the influence of values on feedback seeking are outlined and tested empirically using samples from Canada, China, Mexico, the Netherlands, Spain, and the United States. As predicted, results indicate that significant aspects of feedback seeking were related to personal values. The perceived cost of feedback seeking, the clarity of the feedback from others, and the use of feedback‐seeking behaviors were all linked to personal values. The study also uncovered substantial variations in feedback‐seeking behaviors across nations. The implications of these findings for research on feedback‐seeking behaviors and for feedback practices are discussed.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Aiqi Wu, Xiaotong Zhong and Di Song

This paper aims to explore the influence of entrepreneur’s political involvement on private-own enterprises’ (POEs’) selection of two inter-organizational conflict…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the influence of entrepreneur’s political involvement on private-own enterprises’ (POEs’) selection of two inter-organizational conflict resolutions approaches (private approach and public approach), in the context of China’s transition economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a sample of POEs operating in China’s transition economy in the year 2000, this study investigates the possible association between the entrepreneur’s political involvement and the approach chosen to resolve inter-organizational conflicts. A further step is taken to look into the implications of such a choice.

Findings

The empirical study reveals that those POEs with greater entrepreneurial political involvement have the propensity to rely on public approach. In general, POEs are more satisfied with the private approach than the public approach when managing conflicts. Besides, the study shows that the positive effects derived from the entrepreneur’s satisfaction on private approach will be weakened in more established institutions.

Originality/value

This paper has its unique contribution in highlighting the significance of how entrepreneurs’ political involvement interferes with inter-organizational conflict resolution.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2020

Xiaoyu Yu, Xiaotong Meng, Gang Cao and Yingya Jia

Conflict between work and family is a significant issue for entrepreneurs. The purpose of this study is to explore the effect of entrepreneurial failure on both…

Abstract

Purpose

Conflict between work and family is a significant issue for entrepreneurs. The purpose of this study is to explore the effect of entrepreneurial failure on both family–work conflict (FWC) and work–family conflict (WFC) and the moderating role of perceived control of time and organizational slack based on conservation of resources (COR) theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a questionnaire to explore the relationship between entrepreneurial failure, FWC/WFC, perceived control of time and organizational slack. Data were collected from the Chinese context in 2018 and as a result received 318 valid questionnaires, obtaining a response rate of 63.6 per cent.

Findings

The study finds that entrepreneurial failure has a significant relationship with FWC but a nonsignificant relationship with WFC and that perceived control of time and organizational slack moderate the relationship between entrepreneurial failure and FWC/WFC.

Originality/value

This study aligns the field of family–work (work–family) conflict and entrepreneurial failure. It addresses a research gap in the conflict literature by introducing one form of resource loss: entrepreneurial failure as a source of conflict between work and family based on COR theory and the work–home resources model. The study also enriches the literature on the social cost of entrepreneurial failure by exploring the crossover effect of entrepreneurial failure on conflicts in the family domain. Furthermore, the study advances the understanding of managing conflict between work and family after entrepreneurial failure.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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