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Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Les Ruddock and Steven Ruddock

The purpose of the paper is to assess the critical financial and economic issues associated with the provision of adequate housing in the UK in the face of current and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to assess the critical financial and economic issues associated with the provision of adequate housing in the UK in the face of current and future demographic change.

Design/methodology/approach

The review is based on an investigation of the current state of preparedness of the housing market and its various stakeholders based on recent reports and secondary statistical evidence.

Findings

The findings emphasise the need for a multi-faceted approach to tackle the challenges that need to be addressed. Unless measures are initiated to influence the market, the requisite increase in the stock of appropriate housing in the face of rapid demographic change will not occur.

Originality/value

The value of the study is that it identifies the issues based on the current state of provision and makes recommendations for meeting the challenges arising from these issues. These recommendations have strong implications for policymakers and other stakeholders.

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Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Les Ruddock and Steven Ruddock

The purpose of this paper is to assess the role of investment in built assets in the achievement of economic growth as part of a wealth measurement approach and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the role of investment in built assets in the achievement of economic growth as part of a wealth measurement approach and to undertake an analysis of the relative importance of such investment as part of a country’s overall capital asset portfolio.

Design/methodology/approach

Panel data on capital asset investment are used to compare groups of countries at different stages of development. Data sets on investment and capital levels from the Penn World Tables 9.0 are used. Population and gross domestic product data are taken from the same source and the UN Statistics Division. World Bank reports provide data on countries’ income group classification.

Findings

There is confirmation of the view that, as economies grow, a pattern of investment based on developing a different structure of capital asset portfolio occurs. Investment patterns similar to those found in advanced countries arise as low income countries move to higher income classification groups even though built assets remain the most valuable capital asset group.

Originality/value

The study provides time series evidence on the nature of changing capital investment patterns in countries’ economies and demonstrates the value of a wealth measurement approach.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Mike McGrath

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Abstract

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Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Mike McGrath

The purpose of the paper is to provide a review of the most recent literature concerning document supply and related matters.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to provide a review of the most recent literature concerning document supply and related matters.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper's approach is the reading of over 150 journals as well as monographs, reports and websites.

Findings

Electronic books remain a minority market but the literature at least remains optimistic and readers are improving in quality and acceptability. Open access continues to grow but with continuing and widely differing views on its impact – especially the author‐pays model. Recent mandating decisions will mean a step change in the both the creation and the growth of institutional and subject repositories. Increasing concerns are being expressed about the monopolistic implications of Google and there are some stout counter arguments. A number of interesting articles on document supply show it to be in robust health. The economic crisis will have a mixed impact on document supply as libraries consider cuts in acquisition budgets.

Originality/value

The paper represents a useful source of information for librarians and others interested in document supply and related matters.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Abimbola Olukemi Windapo and Jack Steven Goulding

The purpose of this paper is to examine green building legislation requirements and practices in the construction project execution stage within the context of the South…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine green building legislation requirements and practices in the construction project execution stage within the context of the South African construction industry. The rationale for this examination rests with the perception that the implementation of green practices (per se) has been recognised as being “behind” the legislation enacted to control the design and construction of green buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

The research process consisted of a literature review to identify existing green building legislation and practices applicable to the project execution phase. This was supported by a sequential mixed-method research approach, which involved a survey of contracting companies based in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. Purposive sampling was used to undertake focused interviews with management staff and site operatives.

Findings

Research findings established a number of issues, not least: a gap between green building practices and legislation requirements; a high degree of unawareness of green building legislation/practices by construction company stakeholders; selective implementation of health and safety legislative requirements; that management staff had a more “positive” attitude to green building practices than site-based staff who tended to be less motivated and open to such practices.

Research limitations/implications

Results from this study are considered generalisable with the sample frame only. Research inference and projections should therefore only be made within this set, and not to the wider population of South African contractors (as this study was limited to the Western Cape Province).

Practical implications

Implications from this research are applicable to construction company stakeholders within the population set. Practical considerations include the need to acknowledge a formal commitment to developing a sustainable built environment – especially cognisant of the gap between practices on site and green building legislation requirements. Moreover, this lack of awareness in respect of green building practices and legislation requirements impinges upon several wider areas, not least: construction company stakeholders’ positioning, health and safety practices; managerial and operational staff perceptions, and stakeholders’ willingness and motivation to proactively address these gaps.

Social implications

Government bodies and allied professionals in charge of construction industry development are encouraged to consider the implementation of green building legislation requirements on construction sites. This reflection should encourage engagement through formative legislative provision and transparent awareness campaigns.

Originality/value

This work is original insofar as it directly addresses the alignment of legislation to current practices within the context of the South African construction industry. However, similar exercises have been undertaken on green building legislation in other countries such as USA, UK and Australia.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Samad M. E. Sepasgozar, Martin Loosemore and Steven R. Davis

The purpose of this paper is to present a critical review of research in information and equipment technology adoption in the construction industry. The study also aims to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a critical review of research in information and equipment technology adoption in the construction industry. The study also aims to formulate a conceptual framework of the different stages in the adoption process identify gaps in the existing literature and to provide a holistic picture of contemporary research in technology adoption in construction research literature.

Design/methodology/approach

A generic framework is initially proposed containing the fundamental concepts of “pre-adoption”, “adoption” and “post-adoption”. The review separates the literature according to three key perspectives: “socio-economic”; “managerial”; and “psychological”. The applicability of the existing approaches to the construction context is discussed, and then a new conceptual framework for construction is developed.

Findings

Significant gaps in the understanding of construction technology adoption are identified that provide an interesting agenda for future research. A Construction Technology Adoption Framework is presented, which draws together all of sub-processes involved in technology adoption. This framework covers key activities of both the vendor and the customer.

Research limitations/implications

The study has been restricted to information technologies and construction equipment technology. Other construction technologies, such as formwork systems, have not been examined.

Practical implications

The new framework provides a direction for research into the technology adoption process including key sub-processes and potential research areas. The framework also assists vendors to influence customers’ decision-making processes, and guides new customers in setting up their own decision procedures.

Originality/value

This paper departs from earlier research by focusing on information and equipment technology adoption rather than innovation adoption in general. In addition, this paper considers both sides of the adoption equation (vendor and customer), which is in contrast to previous binary studies which considered one side or the other. It delineates the boundaries of different concepts such as diffusion, adoption, acceptance and implementation, which have been interchangeably used in previous studies. This paper introduces the concept of dissemination to construction, which has previously been investigated in other industries.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Adam Connell and Jim Mason

The purpose of this paper is to demystify the meaning of the term “consequential loss” in relation to the practice of construction law. Parties may have different…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demystify the meaning of the term “consequential loss” in relation to the practice of construction law. Parties may have different understandings of the term and typically an exclusion clause will not solely relate to consequential loss, but will also include other heads of losses for which the party will not be liable for, such as loss of profit, loss of revenue and loss of business.

Design/methodology/approach

The question emerges as to whether the term consequential loss has a definitive legal meaning in its own right. This study seeks to ascertain the definition of the term consequential loss within the construction industry through a review of the legal position regarding liability for breach of contract and consequential loss through the consideration of the case law relating to this topic and the associated secondary sources of information.

Findings

The study concludes by elucidating a clear interpretation of the term consequential loss and guidance of how it should be used in contract law.

Originality/value

Recent cases and established authorities are considered together for the first time in this work which assists in the development of legal principles of direct and indirect losses and the determination of how they apply to the built environment.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Tony Hetherton and Jennifer Charlson

This paper aims to examine the potential recovery of own party adjudication costs under the Late Payment of Commercial Debts Regulations 2013. The investigation directly…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the potential recovery of own party adjudication costs under the Late Payment of Commercial Debts Regulations 2013. The investigation directly applies to England and Wales, but may be relevant to other jurisdictions.

Design/methodology/approach

The interaction between The Late Payment of Commercial Debts Regulations 2013 (derived from European Directive 2011/7/EU on combating late payment in commercial transactions) and the Local Democracy et al. 2009 including reference to case law was explored. A qualitative research framework was used to collect primary data through semi-structured interviews with experienced construction industry adjudication professionals.

Findings

It was discovered that adjudicators are awarding own party costs under the Regulations, but there was disagreement on the issues in both the literature and amongst the interviewees.

Research limitations/implications

A definitive judgment is awaited from the Technology and Construction Court.

Originality/value

This paper will be of value to construction industry adjudication professionals.

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Emmanuel Itodo Daniel, Christine Pasquire, Graham Dickens and Herman Glenn Ballard

The purpose of this paper is to identify how the newly emerging UK practice of “collaborative planning” (CP) for construction project delivery aligns with the advocated…

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3846

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how the newly emerging UK practice of “collaborative planning” (CP) for construction project delivery aligns with the advocated principles of the global last planner system (LPS) of production planning and control.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed, qualitative, exploratory approach was adopted for the study. This entailed qualitative data through three techniques, namely: semi-structured interviews, documents analysis, and structured observation. In total, 30 in-depth interviews were conducted over a 12 month period with lean construction consultants, clients, main contractors, and subcontractors drawn from the building, highways and infrastructure and rail sector. In all, 15 projects were visited where practices were observed.

Findings

The study reveals that the current practice of CP in the UK partially aligns with the LPS principles. Where practitioners have heard of the LPS they believe it to be the same practice as CP.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to 30 interviews, observation of 15 projects and document analysis. The aim of the study is not to generalise the findings, however, since the study examined top construction companies and practitioners in the UK and the findings were consistent across the sample, some conclusions could be made. The study is also limited to examining the construction phase only, future studies should incorporate the design phase.

Practical implications

A clear identification of the elements of current practice compared to the components of the LPS provides a contribution to the future practice of project production planning and management in the construction industry.

Social implications

The study highlights a continuing resistance to collaboration within the industry. This resistance is subtly embedded within implemented practices even though they are based on collaborative working for their success.

Originality/value

This is among the first studies in the UK that comprehensively examines and reports the application of LPS/CP practice in construction across the major construction sectors. Future studies could build on the findings from this work to develop an approach/methodology to improve the current practice.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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