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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Steven McCartney, Caroline Murphy and Jean Mccarthy

Drawing on human capital theory and the human capital resources framework, this study explores the knowledge, skills, abilities and other characteristics (KSAOs) required…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on human capital theory and the human capital resources framework, this study explores the knowledge, skills, abilities and other characteristics (KSAOs) required by the emerging role of human resource (HR) analysts. This study aims to systematically identify the key KSAOs and develop a competency model for HR Analysts amid the growing digitalization of work.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting best practices for competency modeling set out by Campion et al. (2011), this study first analyzes 110 HR analyst job advertisements collected from five countries: Australia, Canada, Ireland, the United Kingdom and the USA. Second a thematic analysis of 12 in-depth semistructured interviews with HR analytics professionals from Canada and Ireland is then conducted to develop a novel competency model for HR Analysts.

Findings

This study adds to the developing and fast-growing field of HR analytics literature by offering evidence supporting a set of six distinct competencies required by HR Analysts including: consulting, technical knowledge, data fluency and data analysis, HR and business acumen, research and discovery and storytelling and communication.

Practical implications

The research findings have several practical implications, specifically in recruitment and selection, HR development and HR system alignment.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the evolving HR analytics literature in two ways. First, the study links the role of HR Analysts to human capital theory and the human capital resource framework. Second, it offers a timely and empirically driven competency model for the emerging role of HR Analysts.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Edward Brent

The chapter will review significant changes in information technology (IT) affecting research over the 30-year history of Communication, Information Technology, and Media…

Abstract

The chapter will review significant changes in information technology (IT) affecting research over the 30-year history of Communication, Information Technology, and Media Sociology. It compares broad overviews of computers and the social sciences published shortly after the beginning of the section (1989 and 1990) with a contemporary overview of online research methods from 2017. It also draws on my own experiences from 1981 to the present as both an academic and a software entrepreneur. The author will discuss how changes in the section parallel developments in social science computing over this period, identifying some of the significant ways IT has transformed both the methods of research and the substantive foci of research. Finally, the author extrapolates into the future to consider how continuing changes in the Internet, big data, artificial intelligence, and natural language understanding may change how sociological research is conducted in the foreseeable future.

Details

Networks, Hacking, and Media – CITA MS@30: Now and Then and Tomorrow
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-666-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Steven H. Appelbaum and John Gallagher

Aims to understand how training and communication help an organization to learn and gain a competitive advantage. Explores the link between training, communication and…

Abstract

Aims to understand how training and communication help an organization to learn and gain a competitive advantage. Explores the link between training, communication and measurement with individual and organizational learning by conducting a specific qualitative analysis looking for insights into how the concepts sometimes work and how they fail. Also touches on the general themes that have shaken management and employees over the last 15 years as they struggle to survive and prosper in the global village, and compares this concept with ideas that have been prevalent in organizations since the early 1970s. The objective is to understand how organizations can tap their intangible assets and increase their value to the organization, the individual who holds the knowledge and the society that benefits from a healthy economy.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Steven Pike, Constanza Bianchi, Gayle Kerr and Charles Patti

Although the branding literature emerged during the 1940s, research relating to tourism destination branding has only gained momentum since the late 1990s. There remains a…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the branding literature emerged during the 1940s, research relating to tourism destination branding has only gained momentum since the late 1990s. There remains a lack of theory in particular that addresses the measurement of the effectiveness of destination branding over time. The purpose of this paper is to test the effectiveness of a model of consumer‐based brand equity (CBBE) for a country destination.

Design/methodology/approach

A model of CBBE was adapted from the marketing literature and applied to a nation context. The model was tested by using structural equation modelling with data from a large Chilean sample (n=845) comprising a mix of previous visitors and non‐visitors. The model fits the data well.

Findings

The paper reports the results of an investigation into brand equity for Australia as a long‐haul destination in an emerging market. The research took place just before the launch of the nation's fourth new brand campaign in six years. The results indicate Australia is a well‐known but not compelling destination brand for tourists in Chile, which reflects the lower priority the South American market has been given by the national tourism office.

Practical implications

The paper suggested that CBBE measures could be analysed at various points in time to track any strengthening or weakening of market perceptions in relation to brand objectives. A standard CBBE instrument could provide long‐term effectiveness performance measures regardless of changes in destination marketing organisation staff, advertising agency, other stakeholders and budget.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the nation‐branding literature by being one of the first to test the efficacy of a model of CBBE for a tourism destination brand.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Steven H. Appelbaum, Adam Marchionni and Arturo Fernandez

The purpose of this article is to describe multi‐tasking behaviour in the workplace; to link its cause to the increasing prevalence of low‐cost information and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to describe multi‐tasking behaviour in the workplace; to link its cause to the increasing prevalence of low‐cost information and communications technologies and to the changing organizational structures that have evolved to meet the demands and opportunities of these technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is a presentation of the current literature on multi‐tasking behaviour among knowledge workers with a selective bibliography addressing empirical research into the behavioural, managerial and technological aspects of this phenomenon. It then expands to comprehensive coverage of the literature on past and current thinking about task structuring, strategies for coping in a multi‐tasking environment and the changing nature of work and organizations, which fuels the need to multi‐task in response to these changes.

Findings

Among knowledge workers, multi‐tasking behaviour appears to be an inevitable consequence of the presence of increasingly easy access to information. Despite the detrimental effect that multi‐tasking has on specific task completion, the paradox is that this does not seem to have an effect on overall organizational productivity. For the USA at least, an average 4 per cent growth rate over the past several years of the late twentieth and early twenty‐first centuries shows that productivity has increased in tandem with an increase in multi‐tasking behaviour and information technologies.

Practical implications

Multi‐tasking behaviour needs to be understood in the context of its manifestation as a variable that is at least partially dependent on the existence of relatively “cheap” information. In essence, in an information economy, task completion by knowledge workers to a set deadline may be counterproductive to the interests of the organization as a whole. This article describes certain strategies that can be used to minimize the harmful aspects of continuous task switching and to maximize the returns to experience that multi‐tasking can bring to an organization.

Originality/value

Multi‐tasking behaviour and its link to complexity theory may lead to a new understanding of organizations as highly fluid and variable entities that are impossible to design or maintain centrally and yet whose goals lead to the moment by moment creation of micro‐organizational structures that accomplish tasks in a manner that engages the full resources of knowledge workers.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 March 2020

Abstract

Details

From Blofeld to Moneypenny: Gender in James Bond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-163-1

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Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Ellis Cashmore

Abstract

Details

Kardashian Kulture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-706-7

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Book part
Publication date: 26 March 2020

Shelley O’Brien

From Dr No in 1962 to Spectre in 2015 the opening themes for James Bond movies have always played an important role in marketing, audience expectation and reception…

Abstract

From Dr No in 1962 to Spectre in 2015 the opening themes for James Bond movies have always played an important role in marketing, audience expectation and reception. Whether instrumental or sung, brassy or orchestral, upbeat or mellow, the music and/or lyrics, alongside innovative title sequences, function as key signifiers of gender representation in the ongoing series of spy adventures. Bond’s suave machismo, for example, is immediately set out in the opening titles for Dr No created by Maurice Binder. The iconic image of Bond viewed through a gun barrel as a shot rings out, is punctuated by Monty Norman’s theme music with its swinging brass and the tough, machine-gun like sound of electric guitar being played fiercely with a plectrum. Although this theme became synonymous with the character, there was a shift towards songs written specifically to tie-in with subsequent film titles although the lyrics rarely had anything to do with the narratives of the film. The title sequences themselves also became more provocative, invariably focussing on silhouetted, naked or semi-naked female bodies or their component parts alongside gun barrels and bullets, albeit in a highly stylised and artistic manner. This chapter, then, will consider how the theme music functions with the opening credits sequences in relation to the representation of women, race and the image of Bond himself and how the character has changed over time.

Details

From Blofeld to Moneypenny: Gender in James Bond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-163-1

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Harnessing the Power of Failure: Using Storytelling and Systems Engineering to Enhance Organizational Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-199-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Abu Sadat Muhammad Sayem, Richard Kennon, Nick Clarke and Steven George Hayes

The purpose of this paper is to identify optimum operating parameters, namely, link-length and vertex angle, for producing virtual clothing prototypes for the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify optimum operating parameters, namely, link-length and vertex angle, for producing virtual clothing prototypes for the purpose of pattern flattening.

Design/methodology/approach

Commercially available physically based simulation and flattening engines were utilized to carry out the computational part of this study. Two separately developed 3D garment templates were used for the creation of virtual garments in the form of a triangulated mesh and later for pattern unwrapping by taking differential link-lengths and vertex angles into account to ascertain their effects on the mesh quality and on the ultimate pattern flattening process.

Findings

It has been found that a link-length between 10 and 15 mm and a vertex angle between 120° and 160° are optimum for the virtual clothing prototyping process.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can universally be applied to simplify the tasks of virtual clothing prototyping and pattern unwrapping using commercial software packages.

Originality/value

Previously, there has not been any guidance available for the selection of specific operational parameters to promote 3D garment design.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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