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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Wade Jarvis and Steven Goodman

This paper aims to explain the structure of the market from the perspective of small brands and to discuss marketing strategy implications.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain the structure of the market from the perspective of small brands and to discuss marketing strategy implications.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses revealed preference data of the Australian wine market, comprising 4,000 wine shoppers' purchases over a 12‐month period. Standard brand performance measures such as penetration and purchase frequency are applied to the data to define niche and change‐of‐pace brands. Using the same data, price tier loyalty is measured using polarisation, and discussed in relation to the attribute offering required and the direct marketing approach required for true niche positions.

Findings

The empirical results show that both niche and change‐of‐pace positions are prevalent in the wine market and small wineries, within a direct marketing channel approach, should target higher price points with branded wines but also lower price point products as well. The results suggest that attribute levels that are change‐of‐pace are unsustainable for small brands and can only be undertaken by large brands with the appropriate marketing resources.

Research limitations/implications

The authors conceptualise that small brands should focus on attribute levels that have excess loyalty. Large brands can absorb attribute levels that are change‐of‐pace. This conceptualisation requires further discussion, particularly from the strategy literature, as well as further empirical testing.

Practical implications

Whilst “niche” positions are the holy grail of some teaching and much practitioner endeavour, this paper has presented data that demonstrate the need for managers to ascertain if the position they occupy is in fact a niche or a change‐of‐pace position.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils a need by using revealed preference behavioural data to highlight different strategies for small and large brands. Behavioural analysis and papers in the past have emphasised the strength and tendency towards large brands without offering insight into small brand strategies.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Wade Jarvis, Cam Rungie, Steven Goodman and Larry Lockshin

This paper has two purposes: to use polarisation to identify variations in loyalty and to apply polarisation to an important non‐brand attribute, price.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper has two purposes: to use polarisation to identify variations in loyalty and to apply polarisation to an important non‐brand attribute, price.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive revealed preference data set of wine purchases is used to apply polarisation. Polarisation was defined in two ways: as a function of the beta binomial distribution (BBD) to give a measure of loyalty for an alternative; and as a function of the Dirichlet multinomial distribution (DMD) to give a baseline level of loyalty. Variations were identified by analysing the differences between the BBD and DMD.

Findings

Polarisation was shown to be one way of identifying variation across price tiers. In the empirical example used, the DMD model is violated with the price tiers not being directly substitutable with one another. Buyers show excess loyalty towards the lowest and highest price tier levels. One tier shows “change‐of‐pace” loyalty. Small brands do better when they focus on high loyalty tiers, middle brands compete in the change‐of‐pace tier and large brands do well across all tiers.

Originality/value

Very little work has been undertaken into price tier loyalty and no known empirical research has been undertaken into behavioural loyalty to price tiers in wine. Very little empirical research has considered the association between excess loyalty for attribute levels (such as price tiers) and the existence of niche, change‐of‐pace and reinforcing brands.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1979

David Carr

It is not news that education has pervasive influence in American society. Our operative skills for everyday life, our professional skills for working life, our personal…

Abstract

It is not news that education has pervasive influence in American society. Our operative skills for everyday life, our professional skills for working life, our personal skills for meaningful life: all of these are derived from educative contexts, in and out of schools. In the broadest frame, we are all teachers and learners, regardless of age or education. Every human is embedded in the complex sets of learning agencies, cultural transactions, and lifelong intergenerational exchanges Lawrence Cremin has called “configurations of education.” These are the permutative influences which mediate and transmit a culture through generations and institutions — work, school, family — and from which every person emerges, more or less intact, as the designer of one life.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2020

Steven A. Brieger, Dirk De Clercq, Jolanda Hessels and Christian Pfeifer

The purpose of this paper is to understand how national institutional environments contribute to differences in life satisfaction between entrepreneurs and employees.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how national institutional environments contribute to differences in life satisfaction between entrepreneurs and employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Leveraging person–environment fit and institutional theories and using a sample of more than 70,000 entrepreneurs and employees from 43 countries, the study investigates how the impact of entrepreneurial activity on life satisfaction differs in various environmental contexts. An entrepreneur’s life satisfaction arguably should increase when a high degree of compatibility or fit exists between his or her choice to be an entrepreneur and the informal and formal institutional environment.

Findings

The study finds that differences in life satisfaction between entrepreneurs and employees are larger in countries with high power distance, low uncertainty avoidance, extant entrepreneurship policies, low commercial profit taxes and low worker rights.

Originality/value

This study sheds new light on how entrepreneurial activity affects life satisfaction, contingent on the informal and formal institutions in a country that support entrepreneurship by its residents.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2019

Steven A. Brieger and Dirk De Clercq

The purpose of this paper is to provide a better understanding of how the interplay of individual-level resources and culture affects entrepreneurs’ propensity to adopt…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a better understanding of how the interplay of individual-level resources and culture affects entrepreneurs’ propensity to adopt social value creation goals.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 12,685 entrepreneurs in 35 countries from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, it investigates the main effects of individual-level resources – measured as financial, human and social capital – on social value creation goals, as well as the moderating effects of the cultural context in which the respective entrepreneur is embedded, on the relationship between individual-level resources and social value creation goals.

Findings

Drawing on the resource-based perspective and Hofstede’s cultural values framework, the results offer empirical evidence that individual-level resources are relevant for predicting the extent to which entrepreneurs emphasise social goals for their business. Furthermore, culture influences the way entrepreneurs allocate their resources towards social value creation.

Originality/value

The study sheds new light on how entrepreneurs’ individual resources influence their willingness to create social value. Moreover, by focussing on the role of culture in the relationship between individual-level resources and social value creation goals, it contributes to social entrepreneurship literature, which has devoted little attention to the interplay of individual characteristics and culture.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Abraham B. (Rami) Shani, M. Tom Basuray, Steven A. Scherling and Janice L. Odell

Quality of work life (QWL) has become an increasingly popularcross‐cultural field of theory and practice. An examination of thecurrent state of the art revealed that the…

Abstract

Quality of work life (QWL) has become an increasingly popular cross‐cultural field of theory and practice. An examination of the current state of the art revealed that the inquiry paradigm is one of the areas that leads to the contradictory and mostly disjointed state of QWL knowledge. A phenomenological‐based approach is proposed and utilized in an exploratory study that examines MBA students′ QWL experiences in the USA and Hong Kong. Discusses the learnings both in terms of the approaches used and the QWL knowledge gained.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Charlotte McPherson

Young people are widely known to have poorer outcomes, social status and political representation than older adults. These disadvantages, which have come to be largely…

Abstract

Young people are widely known to have poorer outcomes, social status and political representation than older adults. These disadvantages, which have come to be largely normalized in the contemporary context, can be further compounded by other factors, however, and are particularly amplified by coming from a lower social class background. An additional challenge for young people is associated with place, with youth who live in more remote and less urban areas at a higher risk of being socially excluded (Alston & Kent, 2009; Shucksmith, 2004) and/or to face complex and multiple barriers to employment and education than their urban-dwelling peers (Cartmel & Furlong, 2000). Drawing upon interviews and focus groups in a qualitative project with 16 young people and five practitioners, and using Nancy Fraser’s tripartite theory of social justice, this paper highlights the various and interlocking disadvantages experienced by working-class young people moving into and through adulthood in Clackmannanshire, mainland Scotland’s smallest council area.

Details

Human Rights for Children and Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-047-0

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Robert H. Scott III and Steven Bloom

This paper aims to examine the relationship between student loan debt and first-time home buying among college graduates aged 23 to 40 years old in the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between student loan debt and first-time home buying among college graduates aged 23 to 40 years old in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the Federal Reserve’s 2019 Survey of Consumer Finances data on American households to present descriptive statistics and run logistic regressions that measure the effects of student loan debt on first-time home buying. The authors also present original survey data of mortgage lenders that provides an industry-level perspective.

Findings

The authors find that having student loan debt does not by itself prohibit first-time home buyers. On the contrary, having student loan debt increases the likelihood of homeownership by 15.1%. People with student loan debt, however, buy homes that are 39.2% less expensive and have 58% less home equity compared to first-time home buyers without student loans. In addition, it is found that the amount of student loan debt is important. People with student loan debt above the median amount among people with student loan debt ($35,000) are 27% less likely to be first-time home buyers.

Practical implications

This paper provides public policy analysts and other researchers a different perspective on the correlation between student loan debt and home buying. This study focuses narrowly on first-time home buyers who are college graduates between 23 and 40 years. Thus, capturing the youngest cohort of first-time home buyers and examine the primary factors that influence their home buying decisions.

Originality/value

First-time homebuyers are historically the largest segment of home buyers making them an important subcategory to study. The rise in student loan debt is posited to explain declining homeownership among younger people. The current literature on student loan debt and home buying often studies samples that are too heterogeneous resulting in mixed findings. This paper adds to the existing literature by filtering the sample to study the effects of student loan debt and first-time home buying among people with at least a college degree who are between 23 and 40 years.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Steven J. French, Stephen J. Kelly and Jennifer L. Harrison

Using a sample of small, regional professional service firms, this paper investigates relationships between firm performance and aspects of strategic planning. Constructs…

Abstract

Using a sample of small, regional professional service firms, this paper investigates relationships between firm performance and aspects of strategic planning. Constructs measuring vision, mission, latent abilities, competitor orientation and market orientation are identified using exploratory factor analysis and respondents categorised as non‐planners, informal planners, formal planners and sophisticated planners. Multiple performance measures were used to assess the relationship between these factors and categories and firm performance. While no significant relationship between the performance measures and factors is identified, a significant relationship between net profit and informal planning emerges. These mixed results bring into question the value of the classical strategic planning process as a means of achieving a sustainable competitive advantage in the market analysed.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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