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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Mark Stover and Steven D. Zink

The World Wide Web (WWW) has become the most visible application of the Internet. Newspapers and popular magazines publish stories on a regular basis about Web sites. The…

Abstract

The World Wide Web (WWW) has become the most visible application of the Internet. Newspapers and popular magazines publish stories on a regular basis about Web sites. The most ubiquitous symbols of the World Wide Web, its Uniform Resource Locator (URL) addresses, are even becoming commonplace on many television commercials. Over the past few years the World Wide Web (along with client applications like Netscape to assist in navigating the Web) has literally brought the Internet to life and to the attention of the general public.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Steven D. Zink

It is common knowledge that public card catalogs in libraries have been poorly understood and inefficiently utilized by a large portion of their searchers. The myriad…

Abstract

It is common knowledge that public card catalogs in libraries have been poorly understood and inefficiently utilized by a large portion of their searchers. The myriad reasons for this situation range from the complicated nature of card filing rules to poor or total lack of understanding of assigned subject headings on the part of users. The emergence of automated online public access catalogs was initially seen as a means of overcoming this pattern of poor utilization. Instead, their widespread adoption has often transferred ineffective user searching behavior to an electronic environment.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Steven D. Zink

There is very likely a place in your library that is far outside your control as a collection development librarian. From all appearances, the materials in this place are…

Abstract

There is very likely a place in your library that is far outside your control as a collection development librarian. From all appearances, the materials in this place are relatively unused, contain a great deal of obsolete or ephemeral material in need of weeding, and worst of all are probably growing in such an unchecked manner that they may outnumber the volumes in your monograph collection. The librarians that work there may even seem a little different—discussing agencies of the federal government with startling familiarity and incomprehensible glee. This place, of course, is your government publications department.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

Steven Zink

In the past few years, as budgets have tightened and available shelving space has diminished, U.S. government documents librarians have for the first time given serious…

Abstract

In the past few years, as budgets have tightened and available shelving space has diminished, U.S. government documents librarians have for the first time given serious consideration to formulating collection development policies and to carefully scrutinizing their expenditures as well as their collections. In the process of evaluating its collection and in an effort to make better use of available funding, the Government Publications Department of the University of Nevada‐Reno (a regional depository with a collection exceeding one million documents) undertook a study to determine if the Department could justify canceling its subscription to the Readex Microprint collection of non‐depository titles represented in the Monthly Catalog of United States Government Publications.

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Collection Building, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

Steven D. Zink

The United States government is the world's largest publisher. Its presses churn out thousands of items annually, covering every conceivable subject. Even though most of…

Abstract

The United States government is the world's largest publisher. Its presses churn out thousands of items annually, covering every conceivable subject. Even though most of the items deal with present day concerns, the United States government is responsible for the publication of a large number of histories. Unfortunately, these works, with the possible exception of the Department of Defense's Military History Series, have received little exposure and limited use. In an effort to bring this valuable resource to light, the following bibliography presents annotated citations to nearly 150 histories published from mid‐1977 through mid‐1979.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Ilene F. Rockman, Virginia Massey‐Burzio, Alan Ritch, Steven D. Zink and Martha L. Hale

Economist John Kenneth Galbraith was once quoted as saying, “There are two types of economists—those who don't know the future, and those who don't know they don't know.”…

Abstract

Economist John Kenneth Galbraith was once quoted as saying, “There are two types of economists—those who don't know the future, and those who don't know they don't know.” The same can be said for librarians.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Joan Berman

This index accompanies the index that appeared in Reference Services Review 16:4 (1988). As noted in the introduction to that index, the articles in RSR that deal with…

Abstract

This index accompanies the index that appeared in Reference Services Review 16:4 (1988). As noted in the introduction to that index, the articles in RSR that deal with specific reference titles can be grouped into two categories: those that review specific titles (to a maximum of three) and those that review titles pertinent to a specific subject or discipline. The index in RSR 16:4 covered the first category; it indexed, by title, all titles that had been reviewed in the “Reference Serials” and the “Landmarks of Reference” columns, as well as selected titles from the “Indexes and Indexers,” “Government Publications,” and “Special Feature” columns of the journal.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Thomas A. Peters

The purpose of this article is to present an overview of the history and development of transaction log analysis (TLA) in library and information science research…

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to present an overview of the history and development of transaction log analysis (TLA) in library and information science research. Organizing a literature review of the first twenty‐five years of TLA poses some challenges and requires some decisions. The primary organizing principle could be a strict chronology of the published research, the research questions addressed, the automated information retrieval (IR) systems that generated the data, the results gained, or even the researchers themselves. The group of active transaction log analyzers remains fairly small in number, and researchers who use transaction logs tend to use this method more than once, so tracing the development and refinement of individuals' uses of the methodology could provide insight into the progress of the method as a whole. For example, if we examine how researchers like W. David Penniman, John Tolle, Christine Borgman, Ray Larson, and Micheline Hancock‐Beaulieu have modified their own understandings and applications of the method over time, we may get an accurate sense of the development of all applications.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Abstract

Details

Using Subject Headings for Online Retrieval: Theory, Practice and Potential
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12221-570-4

Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Steven D. Zink, Ann Medaille, Madeline Mundt, Patrick T. Colegrove and Duncan Aldrich

The purpose of this paper is to discuss an academic library's need to engage all available resources to provide the services required by the changing uses, formats, and…

1867

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss an academic library's need to engage all available resources to provide the services required by the changing uses, formats, and production of information.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the @One service environment as a case study. The service and staffing model employed a sample of 20 students and professionals who work at the @One desk. Attitudes toward the @One space were assessed through one‐on‐one interviews using two different interview protocols. Participants were asked open‐ended questions that allowed them to talk at length in response.

Findings

It is found that the University of Nevada, Reno's Mathewson‐IGT Knowledge Center has implemented a highly interactive service environment in support of production‐intensive information technologies. Professionals from numerous information disciplines participate in staffing the department, but student staff constitute the core of service delivery.

Originality/value

This paper provides information on an interactive staffing model in a US university.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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