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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

77

Abstract

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 70 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Steve Sizmur and Andrew McCulloch

The mental health experience of people from ethnic minorities differs from that of the majority, including differential access to services and treatments. The 2014…

Abstract

Purpose

The mental health experience of people from ethnic minorities differs from that of the majority, including differential access to services and treatments. The 2014 National Health Service (NHS) Community Mental Health survey gathered data from 13,787 individuals in 57 NHS trusts in England, providing one means of monitoring such experience. The purpose of this paper is to analyse survey variables describing treatments offered to respondents for evidence of differential access or treatment experiences associated with ethnicity.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary analysis of survey data. Proportions for target variables were modelled using multilevel logit models. Ethnic background, age and gender were entered as independent variables.

Findings

Respondents in most minority groups were more likely to be on the care programme approach (CPA) to provision than white British respondents and less likely to report receiving psychological treatments. Unmet need for psychological treatment was relatively high in certain Asian groups. Medication use was consistently high across respondents, but differences by ethnic background were evident.

Research limitations/implications

The study was dependent on existing survey data of a relatively limited nature, and potentially subject to non-response bias. The survey excludes users of certain types of service, giving an incomplete cross-section.

Originality/value

This represents a novel use of the data from the Community Mental Health survey, and complements evidence from a range of other sources. The findings mostly concur with other evidence but provide important new data in relation to medication, unmet needs in psychotherapy and use of the CPA. They remain suggestive of the complex nature of discrimination and/or unequal access and treatment in mental health services.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

68

Abstract

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 79 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2012

Steve Pickering

The broad aim of this paper is to look at the relationship between terrain and conflict. Using the opportunity and willingness framework, it argues that there are some…

Abstract

The broad aim of this paper is to look at the relationship between terrain and conflict. Using the opportunity and willingness framework, it argues that there are some long established physical factors, which have been related to the terrain of conflict, but that there are also some equally long established factors that are nonphysical. This latter group includes the notion of a “mountain people,” which is described as being fierce, uncivilized, and resistant to authority. Such arguments may have some foundation, but they are also based on a strong history of determinism and indeed scientific racism. The paper also looks at the “what is a mountain?” debate and argues that this question is entirely misleading for conflict analysis. It is hoped that conflict researchers will be careful whenever they encounter the word “mountain.”

Details

Cooperation for a Peaceful and Sustainable World Part 1
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-335-3

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2012

Abstract

Details

Cooperation for a Peaceful and Sustainable World Part 1
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-335-3

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

David Collins

Building on the arguments of an earlier paper which argued that “empowerment” and repression may go hand‐in‐hand, argues that the study of empowerment at work has been…

667

Abstract

Building on the arguments of an earlier paper which argued that “empowerment” and repression may go hand‐in‐hand, argues that the study of empowerment at work has been ripped from its contextual setting. Argues that studies of empowerment, if they are to be meaningful theoretically and useful practically, must locate and embed “empowering” initiatives within the wider context of their creation and propagation. Analysing institutions of industrial and civil decision making, concludes by making suggestions for the (re)development of empowerment in Britain.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 January 2019

David Calvey

This book chapter reflectively explores the challenges of studying provocation, satire, bad taste and offence in stand-up comedy. The author’s sociological lens on the…

Abstract

This book chapter reflectively explores the challenges of studying provocation, satire, bad taste and offence in stand-up comedy. The author’s sociological lens on the topic is situated within the broader field of humour studies, which is a relatively small yet creative and innovative field within the human, cultural and social sciences. This lost ethnographic project contains shelved and dormant interview data with a number of stand-up comedians, including the controversial and emotive late Bernard Manning and an early career Steve Coogan. The project also explores the author’s autoethnographic journey into rant poetry, as both a hobbyist and, on further reflection, a way of keeping the project informally but theoretically alive. The issues of censorship, political correctness and informed consent are key ones in the author’s confessional type analysis. Finally, the value and richness of loss, failure and resilience as marginalised yet significant and unacknowledged learning resources in our academic adventures are frankly discussed. The call here is for more lost ethnographic projects to be recognised and appreciated in academia.

Details

The Lost Ethnographies: Methodological Insights from Projects that Never Were
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-773-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 March 2010

Jason Kain and Steve Jex

Karasek's (1979) job demands-control model is one of the most widely studied models of occupational stress (de Lange, Taris, Kompier, Houtman, & Bongers, 2003). The key…

Abstract

Karasek's (1979) job demands-control model is one of the most widely studied models of occupational stress (de Lange, Taris, Kompier, Houtman, & Bongers, 2003). The key idea behind the job demands-control model is that control buffers the impact of job demands on strain and can help enhance employees’ job satisfaction with the opportunity to engage in challenging tasks and learn new skills (Karasek, 1979). Most research on the job demands-control has been inconsistent (de Lange et al., 2003; Van Der Deof & Maes, 1999), and the main reasons cited for this inconsistency are that different variables have been used to measure demands, control, and strain, not enough longitudinal research has been done, and the model does not take workers’ individual characteristics into account (Van Der Deof & Maes, 1999). To address these concerns, expansions have been made on the model such as integrating resources, self-efficacy, active coping, and social support into the model (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner, & Schaufeli, 2001b; Johnson & Hall, 1988; Demerouti, Bakker, de Jonge, Janssen, & Schaufeli, 2001a; Landsbergis, Schnall, Deitz, Friedman, & Pickering, 1992). However, researchers have only been partially successful, and therefore, to continue reducing inconstencies, we recommend using longitudinal designs, both objective and subjective measures, a higher sample size, and a careful consideration of the types of demands and control that best match each other theoretically.

Details

New Developments in Theoretical and Conceptual Approaches to Job Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-713-4

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Kristi Zook and Steve Spencer

This paper outlines the steps taken by the Interior Design Unit and the Facilities Maintenance Unit to develop a team dynamic and a methodology for defining a company…

309

Abstract

This paper outlines the steps taken by the Interior Design Unit and the Facilities Maintenance Unit to develop a team dynamic and a methodology for defining a company standards programme to be utilised in building projects. The aim is to accent the need for the collaboration of the two units in developing a process ensuring aesthetically pleasing and maintenance‐friendly attributes. The reader will discover proven design/maintenance ideas developed through the partnership that can be applied to their own organisations. The step‐by‐step process utilised by Interior design and Facilities Maintenance to develop a company standard programme is outlined in detail. Vendor/product evaluation, vendor selection, product specifications and timely process review are identified.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Robert H. Herz

Abstract

Details

More Accounting Changes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-629-1

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