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Article
Publication date: 10 March 2021

Steve Lambert and Dean Wilkinson

The outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus and subsequent COVID-19 illness has had a major impact on all levels of society internationally. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus and subsequent COVID-19 illness has had a major impact on all levels of society internationally. The extent of the impact of COVID-19 on prison staff and prisoners in England and Wales is unknown. Testing for COVID-19 both asymptomatic and symptomatic, as well as for antibodies, to date, has been minimal. The purpose of this paper is to explore the widespread testing of COVID-19 in prisons poses philosophical and ethical questions around trust, efficacy and ethicacy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is both descriptive, providing an overview of the widespread testing of COVID-19 in prisoners in England and Wales, and conceptual in that it discusses and argues the issues associated with large-scale testing. This paper provides a discussion, using comparative studies, of the issues associated with large-scale testing of prisoners across the prison estate in England and Wales (120 prisons). The issues identified in this paper are contextualised through the lens of COVID-19, but they are equally transferrable to epidemiological studies of any pandemic. Given the prevalence of COVID-19 globally and the lack of information about its spread in prisons, at the time of writing this paper, there is a programme of asymptomatic testing of prisoners. However, there remains a paucity of data on the spread of COVID-19 in prisons because of the progress with the ongoing testing programme.

Findings

The authors argue that the widespread testing of prisoners requires careful consideration of the details regarding who is included in testing, how consent is gained and how tests are administered. This paper outlines and argues the importance of considering the complex nuance of power relationships within the prison system, among prisoner officers, medical staff and prisoners and the detrimental consequences.

Practical implications

The widespread testing of COVID-19 presents ethical and practical challenges. Careful planning is required when considering the ethics of who should be included in COVID-19 testing, how consent will be gained, who and how tests will be administered and very practical challenges around the recording and assigning of COVID-19 test kits inside the prison. The current system for the general population requires scanning of barcodes and registration using a mobile number; these facilities are not permitted inside a prison.

Originality/value

This paper looks at the issues associated with mass testing of prisoners for COVID-19. According to the authors’ knowledge, there has not been any research that looks at the issues of testing either in the UK or internationally. The literature available details countries’ responses to the pandemic rather and scientific papers on the development of vaccines. Therefore, this paper is an original review of some of the practicalities that need to be addressed to ensure that testing can be as successful as possible.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2021

Steve Lambert

292

Abstract

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2018

Steve Lambert

In 2017 the UK Government decided that the suite of National Professional Qualifications (National Professional Qualifications for Middle Leadership, National Professional…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2017 the UK Government decided that the suite of National Professional Qualifications (National Professional Qualifications for Middle Leadership, National Professional Qualifications for Senior Leadership and National Professional Qualifications for Headship) needs to be updated in order to ensure they remained relevant to the changing shape of the educational landscape, particularly through the expansion of multi-academy trusts (MATs). At the same time, the Government proposed a new National Professional Qualification for Executive Leadership aimed at the CEOs of MATs. The purpose of this paper is to explore the way in which the new National Professional Qualification (NPQ) programmes are having master’s level criteria embedded into them to facilitate a seamless progression into the master’s level study.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper combines desk research with reflections on the experience of developing the new NPQ programme within higher education institutions (HEIs) and considers the implications of this upon current and emerging HEI practice and research into educational leadership.

Findings

There were a number of key issues highlighted by the paper. Notably, the process of embedding academic criteria into a training programme, which was not used to support the notion of critical reflection. Also, the associated mechanisms of accreditation, existing professional networks and the upskilling of staff delivering the NPQ programme, and a professionally oriented interface between the university, employer and deliverer of the training.

Originality/value

This paper provides an original perspective involving the embedding of master’s level criteria into professional qualifications in the field of educational leadership.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Steve Lambert, Nikolaos Dimitriadis, Michael Taylor and Matteo Venerucci

This paper focusses on the leaders' ability to recognise and empathise with emotions. This is important because leadership and particularly transformational leadership are…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper focusses on the leaders' ability to recognise and empathise with emotions. This is important because leadership and particularly transformational leadership are principally focussed on an individual's social interactions and their ability to identify emotions and to react empathetically to the emotions of others (Psychogios and Dimitriadis, 2020). Many leadership theorists suggest the ability to have and display empathy is an important part of leadership (Bass, 1990; Walumbwa et al., 2008).

Design/methodology/approach

To examine the extent to which those who work in jobs with a significant element of leadership education can recognise and empathise with emotions, 99 part-time postgraduate executive Master of Business Administration (MBA) students took part in an emotional recognition test. First, all participants were shown a sequence of pictures portraying different human facial expressions and the electrical activity in the brain as a result of the visual stimuli were recorded using an electroencephalogram (EEG). The second stage of the research was for the participants to see the same seven randomised images, but this time, they had to report what emotion they believed they had visualised and the intensity of it on a self-reporting scale.

Findings

This study demonstrated that the ability to recognise emotions is more accurate using EEG techniques compared to participants using self-reporting surveys. The findings from this study provide academic departments with evidence that more work needs to be done with students to develop their emotional recognition skills. Particularly for those students who are or will go onto occupy leadership roles.

Originality/value

The use of neuroscientific approaches has long been used in clinical settings. However, few studies have applied these approaches to develop the authors’ understanding of their use in social sciences. Therefore, this paper provides an original and unique insight into the use of these techniques in higher education.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Steve Lambert, Nikolaos Dimitriadis, Matteo Venerucci and Mike Taylor

The purpose of this viewpoint paper is to explore the fixation of the eyes of human resource (HR) professionals' when identifying emotions in the context of workplace research and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this viewpoint paper is to explore the fixation of the eyes of human resource (HR) professionals' when identifying emotions in the context of workplace research and to propose measures that might support them in their role.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines a contemporary literature review with reflections from practice to develop more nuanced understandings of 39 HR professionals' ability to recognise emotions. This paper used eye-tracking technology more commonly used in laboratory-based students to explore the fixation of the eye when identifying emotions.

Findings

The preliminary findings suggest that HR professionals with higher levels of emotional recognition principally focus on the eyes of the recipient, whereas those with lower levels or emotional recognition focus more so the nose or the randomly across the face, depending on the level of emotional recognition. The data suggest that women are better than men, in the sample group at recognising emotions, with some variations in recognising specific emotions such as disgust.

Research limitations/implications

The viewpoint paper proposes a number of implications for middle leaders and suggests that middle leaders should proactively seek out opportunities to be engaged in activities that support the Default Mode Network (DMN) function of the brain and subsequently the relationship-orientated aspects of leadership, for example, coaching other staff members. However, it has to be recognised that the sample size is small and further work is needed before any generalisations can be made.

Originality/value

This paper offers a contemporary review underpinned by a preliminary study into HR professionals' ability to recognise emotions.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Steve Lambert

The purpose of this viewpoint paper is to explore middle leaders' ability to recognise emotions in the context of workplace research, and to propose measures that might support…

2033

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this viewpoint paper is to explore middle leaders' ability to recognise emotions in the context of workplace research, and to propose measures that might support them in their role.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines a contemporary literature review with reflections from practice to develop more nuanced understandings of middle leadership. This paper applied the Geneva Emotional Recognition Test (GERT) to explore the level of emotional recognition of 86 individuals (teachers to headteachers (equivalent to school principals)).

Findings

The preliminary findings suggest that teachers and headteachers have higher levels of emotional recognition than middle and senior leaders. This paper subsequently argues that the task-orientated nature middle leadership compounds an individual's ability to engage effectively in relationship-orientated tasks. This explains why middle leaders scored lower on the GERT assessment. This is further inhibited by the anti-correlation in the brain's ability to deal with the task-positive network (TDM) and default mode network (DMN) processing functions where individuals operate in one neural mode for long periods.

Research limitations/implications

The viewpoint paper proposes a number of implications for middle leaders and suggests that middle leaders should proactively seek out opportunities to be engaged in activities that support the DMN function of the brain and subsequently the relationship-orientated aspects of leadership, for example, coaching other staff members. However, it has to be recognised that the sample size is small and further work is needed before any generalisations can be made.

Originality/value

This paper offers a contemporary review of the role of middle leaders underpinned by a preliminary study into individuals' ability to recognise emotions.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Steve Lambert

In 2015 the Conservative led government announced their plan to increase the number of young people participating in apprenticeship to three million by 2020. As part of this plan…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2015 the Conservative led government announced their plan to increase the number of young people participating in apprenticeship to three million by 2020. As part of this plan there is to be an expansion of the number of degree-level apprenticeships, with the government suggesting that these should be seen as a real alternative to university. Despite the government’s propaganda of an alternative to university, higher education institutions have a pivotal role to play in both the development and delivery of degree-level apprenticeships. However, the accountability for the success of degree-level apprenticeships remains unclear. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an analysis of current notions of outcome-based accountability contextualised through the degree apprenticeship programme.

Findings

The paper illustrates that outcome-based accountability frameworks do little to support the delivery of degree-level apprenticeships. Instead there needs to be a shift to a holistic approach to accountability where student success form just one element of an accountability framework. It concludes that current accountability frameworks may result in an unnecessary confusion around the roles and responsibilities of individual actors associated with degree apprenticeship delivery resulting in a missed opportunity to maximise the value arising from the tri-partite delivery relationship.

Originality/value

This paper provides an original perspective involving accountability associated with degree apprenticeship programmes in the UK.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

David C. Miller

CD‐ROM was first demonstrated in the United States in November 1984. Since then many organizations, including agencies of the Federal government, have embraced the technology, and…

Abstract

CD‐ROM was first demonstrated in the United States in November 1984. Since then many organizations, including agencies of the Federal government, have embraced the technology, and an increasingly large and diverse product base is emerging. In March 1986, Microsoft Corporation sponsored a major conference on the topic, which was attended by almost 1000 persons. The registration fee of $900 precluded most librarians from attending. David Miller provides a thorough report on the conference, and a complete directory of participants, for the benefit of those who could not attend.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Book part
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Ilya Falkovsky

Modern activist artists in their practices try to embody those ideal structures upon which they would like to see free society organized in the future. There are more and more…

Abstract

Modern activist artists in their practices try to embody those ideal structures upon which they would like to see free society organized in the future. There are more and more artists who unite in groups without clear leaders, acting collectively and/or anonymously. Striving to overcome the framework of the field of art and reach a wide public audience, they are guided in their practice by the ideas of radical political philosophers who are close to them in spirit and proclaim a horizontal and decentralized system of governance, direct democracy, to the point of rejecting any power and state.

In the first part of this chapter, I will discuss the history and examples of the existence of a horizontal and decentralized control system in Russia and some other countries, as well as a theoretical rationale for the very idea of direct democracy. Then I will talk about modern collectives trying to apply the ideas of horizontalization and decentralization in their practice.

In the second part of the chapter, I will describe how activist artists try to build their ethics, based on the philosophy of modern anarchism, and to solve an important question – whether or not to participate in institutional and gallery activities.

In the third and final part, I will give the basic philosophical rules of activist art and speculate on whether the work of art activists corresponds to them. My conclusion is that, apart from the grass roots of the movement, from the connection with genuinely protesting and mass movements, the activity of activist artists is doomed to failure.

Details

Art in Diverse Social Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-897-2

Keywords

1 – 10 of 158