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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Robin Miller, Catherine Weir and Steve Gulati

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on research evidence and practice experience of transforming primary care to a more integrated and holistic model.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on research evidence and practice experience of transforming primary care to a more integrated and holistic model.

Design/methodology/approach

It is based on a scoping review which has been guided by primary care stakeholders and synthesises research evidence and practice experience from ten international case studies.

Findings

Adopting an inter-professional, community-orientated and population-based primary care model requires a fundamental transformation of thinking about professional roles, relationships and responsibilities. Team-based approaches can replicate existing power dynamics unless medical clinicians are willing to embrace less authoritarian leadership styles. Engagement of patients and communities is often limited due to a lack of capacity and belief that will make an impact. Internal (relationships, cultures, experience of improvement) and external (incentives, policy intentions, community pressure) contexts can encourage or derail transformation efforts.

Practical implications

Transformation requires a co-ordinated programme that incorporates the following elements – external facilitation of change; developing clinical and non-clinical leaders; learning through training and reflection; engaging community and professional stakeholders; transitional funding; and formative and summative evaluation.

Originality/value

This paper combines research evidence and international practice experience to guide future programmes to transform primary care.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Alan Lotinga

– The purpose of this paper is to describe the approach adopted to building relationships between health and social care in Birmingham.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the approach adopted to building relationships between health and social care in Birmingham.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a practical case study, reflecting on personal experience of being directly involved in the situations and discussions described. It supplements a 2012 paper (Lotinga and Glasby, 2012) on the creation of Birmingham’s Health and Well-being Board.

Findings

Local history and context is crucial in shaping the nature of local joint working initiatives – understanding where local services have come from and why they have made the choices they have is a crucial pre-requisite for understanding current and future opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

This paper aims to place joint working between general practice and social work in a broader organisational, financial and policy setting – and placing local developments in this wider context is crucial for understanding barriers and opportunities locally.

Originality/value

In the absence of a detailed evidence base, front-line practice is often far ahead of the current research evidence. This means that local case studies like this are crucial in terms of sharing learning with other areas of the country, with policy makers and with researchers. While many case studies of joint working are small in nature, Birmingham is the largest local authority in Europe – so this paper also contributes learning based on trying to develop joint working in very large, complex authorities.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Micki Eisenman and Tal Simons

This paper highlights that the strategic use of design, a competitive pattern typically associated with creative industries, those creating and trading meanings, also…

Abstract

This paper highlights that the strategic use of design, a competitive pattern typically associated with creative industries, those creating and trading meanings, also characterizes industries that produce functional or utilitarian goods not typically considered creative. The paper explores the origins of this phenomenon in the context of three industry settings: cars, speciality coffee and personal computers. The analysis theorizes three distinct strategic paths that explain how design may become an institutionalized aspect of competition in industries that are not creative. We explain how firms link their products to the identities of their users, how design is linked to stakeholders' emotions and visceral reactions to products and how intermediaries are relevant to enhancing attention to design. Illuminating these strategic paths allows harnessing some of the well-established understandings about competition in creative industries towards understanding competition in noncreative industries.

Details

Aesthetics and Style in Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-236-9

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Mike W. Peng, Canan C. Mutlu, Steve Sauerwald, Kevin Y. Au and Denis Y.L. Wang

This paper aims to explore the interlock-performance relationship among mainland Chinese firms listed in Hong Kong by taking advantage of a relationship-intensive context…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the interlock-performance relationship among mainland Chinese firms listed in Hong Kong by taking advantage of a relationship-intensive context whereby such a link is likely to be especially important. Although strategic networks such as interlocking directorates have been found to affect a number of strategic behaviors, the link connecting board interlocks and corporate performance has remained ambiguous. Considerable light has been shed on the strategic networks of firms whose shares are listed abroad, which have been under-studied despite their rising importance in the global economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Data come from a particularly interesting historical period – the early 1990s prior to Hong Kong’s 1997 handover to China. Both quantitative and qualitative research have been used.

Findings

Empirically, it was found that good performance in an earlier period helps draw outside directors in a later period, and that network centrality and certain types of interlocks help improve performance, albeit with varying degrees. Overall, our results answer the question whether strategic networks such as interlocks matter for corporate performance with a qualified “yes”.

Originality/value

Taking advantage of a relationship-intensive context, this article explores the interlock-performance relationship among mainland Chinese firms listed in Hong Kong. Focus is specifically on the two years, 1993 and 1995, due to their specific historical importance because these two years represent the beginning of Chinese firms’ listing in Hong Kong.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2014

Philip H. Mirvis and Christopher G. Worley

This chapter introduces the volume’s theme by considering how the forces of globalization and complexity are leading organizations to reshape and redesign themselves, how…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter introduces the volume’s theme by considering how the forces of globalization and complexity are leading organizations to reshape and redesign themselves, how meeting the challenges of sustainable effectiveness and shared value require multiorganization networks and partnerships, and how networks and partnerships develop, function, and can produce both private benefits and public goods.

Design/methodology/approach

We apply findings from social and political evolution frameworks, partnership and collaboration research, and design for sustainability concepts to induce the likely conditions required for sustainable effectiveness from a network perspective.

Findings

Successful partnerships and collaborations in service of sustainable effectiveness will require individual organizations to change their objective function and build new and varied internal and external capabilities.

Originality/value

The chapter sets the stage for the volume’s contributions.

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Book part
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Anindita Banerjee

An essential part of any customer experience management strategy is providing a seamless experience. One of the roadblocks, often a recurring barrier, is the presence of…

Abstract

An essential part of any customer experience management strategy is providing a seamless experience. One of the roadblocks, often a recurring barrier, is the presence of silos. Many people see corporate silos as a function of the organisational structure. But that is only one part of the problem. Influencing siloed mindsets across the length and breadth of the organisation is probably a more significant challenge. The siloed structure and mindset together impact the culture of the organisation that, in turn, affects their quality of customer experience management. This chapter covers the essential aspects of understanding the meaning of silos, including a historical, cultural and organisational perspective on what creates silos. While silos are inevitable, their adverse consequences are not. This chapter provides directions on how to overcome the adverse aspects of silos, thereby enabling better management of customer experiences. Multiple examples, from a customer as well as an organisation point of view, are used to highlight this dimension. The chapter also covers the role of a leader in breaking a silo culture and enabling successful application of various strategies for customer experience management.

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Book part
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Kimberly B. Boal

First and second order learning lie at the center of an organization's ability to exploit its core competencies or explore for new opportunities. Strategic leadership lies…

Abstract

First and second order learning lie at the center of an organization's ability to exploit its core competencies or explore for new opportunities. Strategic leadership lies at the center of this learning process. Strategic leaders enable organizations to learn by telling stories about what the organization is, what the organization does, and what the organization can become. They also enable competence carriers to come together to solve current and future problems by networking. These processes are explored.

Details

Being There Even When You Are Not
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-6-6110-4908-9

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Stephen Denning

The author believes that business leaders and writers are increasingly exploring a fundamental rethinking of the basic tenets of management. This paper aims to address this issue.

Abstract

Purpose

The author believes that business leaders and writers are increasingly exploring a fundamental rethinking of the basic tenets of management. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes five shifts: the firm's goal (a shift from inside‐out to outside‐in); role of managers (a shift from controller to enabler); mode of coordination (from command and control to dynamic linking); values practiced (a shift from value to values); and communications (a shift from command to conversation).

Findings

Among the most important changes being proposed are five basic shifts in management practice.

Research limitations/implications

This paper offers a creative analysis of current business thinking.

Practical implications

The raison d'être of the firm shifts from reducing transaction costs to scalable collaboration, learning and innovation.

Originality/value

By adopting a people‐centered goal, a people‐centered role for managers, a people‐centered coordination mechanism, people‐centered values and people‐centered communication the leaders of a firm can focus on the people who are its customers.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Marko Bastl, Mark Johnson, Howard Lightfoot and Steve Evans

The purpose of this study is to examine a buyer's adoption of servitization and the associated implications for the relationships with its suppliers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine a buyer's adoption of servitization and the associated implications for the relationships with its suppliers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the case study approach to examine the tripartite relationship between a manufacturing company and two of its two suppliers. The paper explores the perspectives of employees on multiple organisational levels, and collects evidence on both sides of a relationship. The authors use template analysis utilising Cannon and Perreault's relationship connectors framework to analyse the data.

Findings

There are overarching implications of servitization adoption for buyer‐supplier relationships. The implications are notable in all five relationship connectors. Parties expected more open exchange of information, operational linkages were strengthened and changes in the structural arrangements of relationships were witnessed. Legal contracts are complemented by relational norms. The authors also observed a departure away from a win‐lose mentality and increased levels of supplier adaptation to support the buyer's provision of integrated solutions.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are confined to this tripartite relationship and to an extent are context specific.

Practical implications

The study unveils buyer‐supplier relationships in a servitized context and provides managers with a better understanding of some of the potential implications that the adoption of a servitization strategy may have for managing buyer‐supplier relationships.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study that explores the implications of servitization on buyer‐supplier relationships. It advances the understanding of the implications that the adoption of servitization has on the manner in which two parties interrelate and conduct commercial exchange.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2009

Erik J. Hunter, J. Henri Burgers and Per Davidsson

Despite an increase in businesses started by celebrities, we have limited understanding as to how celebrity entrepreneurs benefit new ventures. Drawing on a reputational…

Abstract

Despite an increase in businesses started by celebrities, we have limited understanding as to how celebrity entrepreneurs benefit new ventures. Drawing on a reputational capital perspective, we develop the notion of celebrity capital and show how it can be used to uniquely differentiate the venture and to overcome liabilities of newness. We discuss how celebrity capital can negatively influence the venture when negative information about the celebrity surfaces and in terms of limiting the scope of the venture. We discuss the different strategic implications of celebrity capital for ventures using celebrity entrepreneurs versus endorsers.

Details

Entrepreneurial Strategic Content
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-422-1

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