Search results

1 – 10 of 165
Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 April 2018

Brent McKenzie, Steve Burt and Igor Dukeov

2304

Abstract

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Carys Jane Egan-Wyer, Steve Burt, Jens Hultman, Ulf Johansson, Alice Beckman and Clara Michélsen

The study aims to explore how concept stores (theoretically) differ from other experience-based retail formats, and hence, how they (practically) contribute to a…

2546

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore how concept stores (theoretically) differ from other experience-based retail formats, and hence, how they (practically) contribute to a diversified retail store portfolio.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study based on semi-structured, qualitative interviews with seven IKEA retail managers, three industry experts and 26 customers of IKEA concept stores in London and Stockholm.

Findings

The concept store represents a conceptual departure from other experiential store formats. It is neither fully experiential in the sense that it is not only about marketing communications nor is it sales or profit-focused. Its aim is to be an accessible touchpoint that reduces friction on a diversified customer journey with its value to the retail portfolio being that it attracts new and latent customers, mitigates existing inhibiting factors and drives them to other touchpoints.

Research limitations/implications

Ideas about the different characteristics of new store formats and their potential to shape the customer experience are extended. New formats reflect innovation in retailing and are part of a retail portfolio which generates different customer expectations and determinants from traditional store formats which provide the customers' existing reference point.

Practical implications

The contributions of new formats should be evaluated in light of other existing formats in the portfolio and not isolated. This is particularly true when considering format cannibalisation and the potentially extended customer journey that arises when customers use traditional format stores and new concept format stores simultaneously.

Originality/value

Previous research, using sales metrics and market-based results as performance determinants, suggests negative outcomes for format diversification. Our study suggests that the contributions of the concept store format should be viewed from an overall customer journey perspective and the “performance” of different format based touchpoints are not best captured through traditional sales evaluation methods.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

Steve Burt

The independent shopkeeper in France has always played a very important role, and historically they have been supported — if only in theory — by government intervention…

Abstract

The independent shopkeeper in France has always played a very important role, and historically they have been supported — if only in theory — by government intervention. Hypermarkets began to develop in France in the early 1960s and it was not long before their increasing share of total retail trade began to alarm the smaller operators. In 1973 the Loi Royer, which attempted to restrict hypermarket expansion beyond certain limits, was introduced. Has it had any effect? Or has the slowing down in hypermarkets in France has been due to a number of other causes? Steve Burt suggests that the law may not have had the restrictive effect that was expected. Any decline in the number of large units opened may be attributable to changing economic conditions and organisational trends.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Steve Burt and Leigh Sparks

Most people have two basic ideas about retailing in eastern European countries — firstly that there are lots of queues, and secondly that if you are privileged there are…

Abstract

Most people have two basic ideas about retailing in eastern European countries — firstly that there are lots of queues, and secondly that if you are privileged there are special shops for you (usually taking hard currency). Beyond this there is little knowledge of what the retail scene really is. These vague perceptions have recently been put to the test by Dr Steve Burt and Dr Leigh Sparks of the University of Stirling, who spent a number of weeks in Poland studying and investigating the organisation and structure of Polish retailing. Their trip was made possible by the generous financial assistance of the British Academy/Polish Academy of Sciences exchange scheme. This paper reports on the findings of their study tour.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Steve Burt

Assesses the evolution of retail brands within British grocery retailing over the past 25 years. Highlights key issues in defining retail brands which contribute to our…

20576

Abstract

Assesses the evolution of retail brands within British grocery retailing over the past 25 years. Highlights key issues in defining retail brands which contribute to our understanding of their role and impact upon company strategy, and then explores how British retailers have managed the evolution of these product ranges. Identifies key factors as the changing basis and use of retail power in the distribution channel, the centralisation of management activities, and the appreciation of what constitutes retail image. Argues that British grocery retailers have successfully managed these factors to create a retail brand which is now regarded by customers as being at least equal to, if not better than, the established manufacturer brands.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Steve Burt and Keri Davies

The purpose of the paper is to present a review of the existing research themes in the area of retail branding, and note how these have developed as the conceptualisation…

9667

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to present a review of the existing research themes in the area of retail branding, and note how these have developed as the conceptualisation of “branding” in retailing has itself evolved.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews existing research themes within retail branding. There is a vast body of academic literature on branding, or aspects of branding in retailing. The initial focus of academic work was upon the product perspective via studies of the store brand. This body of work is summarised under five broad themes – the characteristics of store brand prone consumers and the product attributes which attract consumers; the growth of and motivations for retail brand development; the role of changing channel relationships and behaviours on store brand development; intra‐category brand relationships; and the concept of copycat brands. From this initial, rather narrow, perspective research has evolved, taking on a wider view the brand in retailing which in turn has encompassed the store and the organisational perspectives.

Findings

The evolution of branding in retailing from studies of store brands to the exploration of the retail‐er as a brand has been matched with a widening of the conceptualisation of the brand in retail research: from the product as a brand to the store as a brand and most recently to the organisation as a brand. This has implications for future research in terms of the themes under investigation, research design, and the research methodologies employed.

Originality/value

The paper summarises the themes in existing retail branding research, notes the evolution of thought in retail brand research and suggests areas for future research.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 38 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 February 2003

Steve Burt and Robin Limmack

Takeover activity has played an important role in the restructuring of the U.K. retail sector over the past two decades and appears likely to do so in

Abstract

Takeover activity has played an important role in the restructuring of the U.K. retail sector over the past two decades and appears likely to do so in

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-003-6

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Steve Burt and Jose Carralero‐Encinas

Argues that for many retailers, competitive advantage in the home market has been based upon the development of strong store and corporate images as retailers strive to…

13681

Abstract

Argues that for many retailers, competitive advantage in the home market has been based upon the development of strong store and corporate images as retailers strive to develop themselves as brands in their own right. The construction of store image, comprising both tangible and intangible dimensions, compounds problems of moving into international markets – as consumers in the host environment are less familiar with the intangible dimensions of image, which have been built up over time with exposure to the retail company. Retail companies therefore need to fully understand the importance of image in competitive positioning and the components of store image before attempting to replicate this image and positioning overseas. Explores these issues with reference to Marks & Spencer and the company’s entry into the Spanish market. A survey of customer perceptions of a range of store image attributes in the UK and Spain, reveals differences and similarities in perceptions, which must be managed if a standardised position is to be sought in the host market.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 17 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Lars Esbjerg, Steve Burt, Hannah Pearse and Viviane Glanz-Chanos

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role that retailers play in innovation in the food sector.

1829

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role that retailers play in innovation in the food sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis is based on interviews with retailers and food suppliers from Belgium, Denmark and the UK.

Findings

The findings show that in different ways retailers act both as caretakers of consumer interests and as barriers to innovation. Retailers are not interested in new technologies per se, but whether new technologies and the products made using them provide clearly identifiable benefits to consumers. These products must carry minimum risk for the retailer and there is a clear need for benefits to be communicated in commercial rather than technological terms to both retailers and consumers.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is that the study is based on interviews with retailers and suppliers in three countries.

Practical implications

Food suppliers developing new products based on novel technologies need to identity and communicate clear benefits to consumers if their products are to be adopted by grocery retailers.

Originality/value

This paper extends the understanding of the important role that retailers play in the diffusion of new innovative food products, services and technologies to consumers.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Christopher M. Moore, John Fernie and Steve Burt

Addresses an area which has been neglected in the international retailing literature; the internationalisation of the fashion designer’s brand. Initial exploratory…

21298

Abstract

Addresses an area which has been neglected in the international retailing literature; the internationalisation of the fashion designer’s brand. Initial exploratory research revealed that there were 114 international fashion design houses competing for a global market of around £24 billion. Further research by postal questionnaire to entrants into the UK market, in addition to semi‐structured interviews with European and US designers, confirmed that this market was buoyant, fuelled by the development of diffusion lines for the mass market. Identifies four stages of market development: wholesale channels to department stores; the creation of ready‐to‐wear flagships; large diffusion flagships; the opening of stores in provincial cities. In order to acquire capital to enable this expansion, over 60 per cent of all fashion designers are now public limited companies. Even then franchising of stages 3 and 4, diffusion line development, is often franchised to third parties with the designer maintaining control over the product and its brand image. Between 20‐30 per cent of gross margin is spent on advertising support to create global campaigns to enhance brand image in foreign markets. However, there is increasing tension between the desire to be exclusive yet becoming involved in product line extensions and widespread distribution which could ultimately dilute the brand’s value.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

1 – 10 of 165