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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Zoe Chao, Steve Borrelli, Bikalpa Neupane and Joseph Fennewald

The purpose of this paper is to triangulate qualitative and quantitative data with existing data to inform on the function and user experience of a newly created the “News…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to triangulate qualitative and quantitative data with existing data to inform on the function and user experience of a newly created the “News Library,” and, further, to inform on the viability of “bring your own device spaces” (BYOD) in meeting the computing needs of Penn State University Park students through a multi-dimensional study.

Design/methodology/approach

This study leverages several methodologies for data collection, including observation, survey, flip chart prompts, interviews and focus groups.

Findings

Findings suggest that the News Library accommodates users’ social needs. However, it does not accommodate their communal needs well. The majority of students at the Penn State University Park campus, own laptops and bring them to the library when they intend to study. Personal device usage is preferable to library-provided computers per a familiarity with their personal device, access to personal files and independence of workspace.

Research limitations/implications

As this is a case study, the findings are not generalizable. This study was conducted in one library, on one campus at a 24-campus institution with over 30 libraries.

Originality/value

The mixed-methods study provides multiple views into user behaviors and expectations. The authors propose guidelines for informing the design of BYOD spaces.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2021

Lana Munip, Leigh Tinik, Steve Borrelli, Gabriella Reese Randone and Eun Jung Paik

The purpose of this study is to investigate the evolving ways library users engaged with services and resources and how library services adapted to meet their needs, in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the evolving ways library users engaged with services and resources and how library services adapted to meet their needs, in order to improve practice post-pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

During Fall 2020 and Spring 2021, nine studies were conducted which examined the usage of space, services and resources; and employee and student perspectives. Findings from these studies were synthesized for this investigation through a process of qualitative meta-synthesis.

Findings

The themes from this meta-synthesis point to an ongoing need for streamlining services and processes, to improve efficiency as well as enable the Libraries to be prepared for the next crisis.

Originality/value

While change takes time for large organizations, the existence of system-wide processes and services enabled library employees to continue assisting users across all Penn State campuses, demonstrating that the University Libraries could be considered a model for the “One Penn State” vision that the university strives to achieve by 2025.

Details

Library Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Steve Borrelli, Zoe Chao and Chao Su

The purpose of this paper, conducted at Penn State University, is to inform a redesign of the library facility integrating a Collaboration Commons projected to cost over $20m.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper, conducted at Penn State University, is to inform a redesign of the library facility integrating a Collaboration Commons projected to cost over $20m.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods design comprised of observation, focus groups, conversations with students, interviews with Knowledge Commons personnel and a UX Café was employed. Researchers investigated the students’ need for workspaces and soft-seating.

Findings

Findings suggested that students generally come to the libraries with a goal of being productive and they value the productivity generated by spacious and well-designed workspaces over the comfort of soft-seating. Students desire an increase in the availability of workspaces.

Originality/value

These findings informed facility enhancement recommendations, and have been integrated into the program statement made available to design firms bidding on the renovation project.

Details

Library Management, vol. 40 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2018

Steve Borrelli, Chao Su, Shenetta Selden and Lana Munip

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived role of library personnel in supporting first-generation students at Penn State University Libraries, and also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived role of library personnel in supporting first-generation students at Penn State University Libraries, and also how students’ perceptions of library personnel change over time, and the various experiences that influenced their changes in perception.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed focus groups to solicit input from first-generation students. A four-step team-based approach to qualitative coding process was developed including the development of a codebook informed by common themes and concepts drawn from the literature.

Findings

Findings indicate that operating from a deficit of library cultural capital often results in low awareness of available services and changes in perception are more influenced by personal exploration than limited interactions with personnel. Further, while currently employed interventions are well targeted, opportunities exist for enhancing efforts.

Research limitations/implications

As this is a case study, the findings are not generalizable. Per conducting only four focus groups, the experiences of participants may not represent the typical scope of personnel-related interactions.

Originality/value

This study adds to the limited body of evidence that first-generation students’ struggle from a deficit of library-related cultural capital.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Joel Cummings, Alex Merrill and Steve Borrelli

The purpose of this paper is to carry out a survey in order to better understand the nature of handheld mobile computing use by academic library users and to determine…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to carry out a survey in order to better understand the nature of handheld mobile computing use by academic library users and to determine whether there is a significant demand for using the library services with these small screen devices.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey is created to measure whether people want to access an OPAC with a small screen. Additionally, through open‐ended questions, the survey attempts to gain a broader understanding of handheld mobile computing's impact on, and implications for, the services provided by academic libraries.

Findings

A total of 58.4 percent of respondents who own a web‐enabled handheld device indicate that they would use small screen devices, such as PDAs or web‐enabled cell phones to search a library OPAC.

Originality/value

The increasing prevalence of handheld mobile computing devices such as PDAs and web‐enabled cell phones warrants investigation as to its impact on libraries. This study examines an academic library user population and the potential demand for using the library's catalog with handheld mobile computing devices

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Deborah K. King

As the First Lady, Michelle Obama stated that she had a number of priorities but that the first year would be mainly about supporting her two girls in their transitions to…

Abstract

As the First Lady, Michelle Obama stated that she had a number of priorities but that the first year would be mainly about supporting her two girls in their transitions to their new life in the White House. Her choice to be mom-in-chief drew unusually intense and rather puzzling, scrutiny. The chapter briefly discusses the range of reactions along the political spectrum as well as African-American feminists’ analyses of the stereotypes of Black women underlying those reactions. This analysis engages the debates from a different perspective. First, the chapter addresses the under-theorizing of the racialized gender norms embedded in the symbolism of the White House and the role of First Lady. It challenges the presumption of traditional notions of true womanhood and the incorrect conclusion that mothering would preclude public engagement.

Second and most importantly, this chapter argues that there are fundamental misunderstandings of what mothering meant for Michelle Obama as African-American woman. Cultural traditions and socio-historical conditions have led Black women, both relatives and non-kin, to form mothering relationships with others’ children and to appreciate the interdependence of “nurturing” one's own children, other children, and entire communities. Those practitioners whose nurturing activities encompassed commitment and contributions to the collectivity were referred to as community othermothering. Using primary sources, this chapter examines in detail Michelle Obama's socialization for and her practice of community othermothering in her role as First Lady. Attention is focused on her transformation of White House events by extending hospitality to more within Washington, DC, and the nation, plus broadening young people's exposure to inspiration, opportunities, and support for setting and accomplishing their dreams. Similarly, the concept of community othermothering is also used to explain Michelle Obama’s reinterpretation of the traditional First Lady's special project into the ambitious “Let's Move” initiative to end childhood obesity within a generation. The othermothering values and endeavors have helped establish the White House as “the People's House.”

Details

Race in the Age of Obama
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-167-2

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