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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2019

Steven Bellman, Jamie Murphy, Shruthi Vale Arismendez and Duane Varan

This paper aims to test TV sponsorship bumper effects, for the same brand, on 30-s TV spot advertising.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test TV sponsorship bumper effects, for the same brand, on 30-s TV spot advertising.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental study tests sponsorship bumpers and 30-s TV spot ads for eight brands, four familiar and four unfamiliar, using realistic stimuli and a sample representative of the US population.

Findings

Sponsorship boosts ad effectiveness and is measured by ad awareness and ad liking. Both effects were stronger for unfamiliar brands.

Research limitations/implications

The results show that combining sponsorship with spot advertising has an additive effect. The study design did not allow tests for potential synergy (multiplicative) effects.

Practical implications

Advertisers can use the results to evaluate investing in sponsorship and advertising packages, which can help unfamiliar brands achieve familiar brand awareness.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to compare the effectiveness of sponsorship-boosted ads with sponsorship bumpers alone and with TV spot ads.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2010

Steffen Zorn, Wade Jarvis and Steve Bellman

As acquiring new customers is costly, putting effort into satisfying and keeping customers over the long term can improve profitability. Firms usually do not know how each…

Abstract

Purpose

As acquiring new customers is costly, putting effort into satisfying and keeping customers over the long term can improve profitability. Firms usually do not know how each individual customer is feeling at any time (their attitude to the firm), so typically a customer's likelihood of leaving (“churning”) is predicted from behavioural data. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how a firm can add attitudinal variables to these churning models by deriving proxy indicators of satisfaction and commitment from behavioural data. The paper tests whether adding these proxies improved predictions of churning compared to a typical model based on purchasing behaviour (PB).

Design/methodology/approach

Analysing data from 6,000 regular customers from an Australian digital versatile disc rental company, logistic regression predicted membership termination (i.e. churning=1) versus continuation (=0). A baseline model used three traditional behavioural variables directly linked to members' PB. A second model including proxies for satisfaction and commitment from the customer database was compared against the baseline model to investigate improvement in churn prediction.

Findings

The most significant predictor of churn is an indicator of commitment: the uncertainty of a customer's commitment, indicated by number of times they changed their subscription plan.

Practical implications

The more customers change their plan, the more likely they are to quit the relationship with the firm, most likely because they are uncertain about how they can benefit from a long‐term commitment to the firm. Monitoring uncertainty indicators, such as plan changing, allows firms to intervene with special offers for uncertain customers, and, therefore, increase the likelihood of them staying with the firm.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the use of customer behaviour recorded in databases to identify proxy indicators of attitude before this attitude translates into churning behaviour.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Case study
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Martin Dandira

Organisational behaviour, business reengineering and management of change, human resources management.

Abstract

Subject area

Organisational behaviour, business reengineering and management of change, human resources management.

Study level/applicability

This case study is intended for undergraduate and post-graduate management degrees. It includes courses on organizational behaviour, human resources management, marketing, business management, travel and tourism and strategic management.

Case overview

Zim-Zum Welcome Hotel is a hotel in Zimbabwe in the travel and tourism sector. It was facing high turnover of employees and this was affecting the business through continuous hiring and training. The organization decided to introduce changes completely changing the way it does things, focusing on satisfying employees as well as customers. The new approach yielded favourable results, labour turnover dropped significantly and business improved greatly. In an effort to improve service, and increase profit, Zim-Zum has begun radically changing the way it hires, trains and deploys frontline workers. Management also examined how waiters and waitress do their job and concluded that there was supposed to be a division of labour between them and culinary staff. Management of Zim-Zum believe that companies that excel at managing frontline workers understand that excellent service is more than just a transaction.

Expected learning outcomes

Students can focus on: the importance of redesigning work so that superior service satisfies both the employee and the customer; human resources management is an important factor in improving employee performance and business performance; the importance of external and internal customers in improving company performance.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Book part
Publication date: 27 February 2009

Melanie Cao and Jason Wei

Starting from 2003, Microsoft and many other companies have either gradually reduced or completely replaced stock options with restricted stocks in their compensation…

Abstract

Starting from 2003, Microsoft and many other companies have either gradually reduced or completely replaced stock options with restricted stocks in their compensation plans. This raises an interesting question: which form of compensation is better, stock or options? This chapter makes an economic comparison between the two compensation vehicles and concludes that stock is preferred to options. The backdrop of the study is dynamic asset allocation within a utility maximization framework whereby the company may go bankrupt. The incorporation of bankruptcy risk into the analysis is motivated by the recent downfalls of companies such as Enron and WorldCom.

We demonstrate that vesting requirements and bankruptcy risk can lead to significant value discounts. When the restricted stock and options have a vesting period of 5 years, and account for 50% of the total wealth, the total discount is more than 60%, out of which 20% is due to bankruptcy risk. More importantly, we find that stock is a better compensation tool than options. For a given dollar amount of grant, the higher the stock proportion, the higher the expected utility. In fact, replacing options by stock can lead to a substantial amount of cost savings for the firm, while maintaining the same level of utility for the employee. For example, when options account for 50% of the total wealth and are subsequently replaced by stock, the granting cost is reduced by about 60%. Our findings therefore provide a theoretical support for the move to stock-only style of performance compensations.

Details

Research in Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-447-4

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Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2017

David S. Lee and Justin McCrary

Using administrative, longitudinal data on felony arrests in Florida, we exploit the discontinuous increase in the punitiveness of criminal sanctions at 18 to estimate the…

Abstract

Using administrative, longitudinal data on felony arrests in Florida, we exploit the discontinuous increase in the punitiveness of criminal sanctions at 18 to estimate the deterrence effect of incarceration. Our analysis suggests a 2% decline in the log-odds of offending at 18, with standard errors ruling out declines of 11% or more. We interpret these magnitudes using a stochastic dynamic extension of Becker’s (1968) model of criminal behavior. Calibrating the model to match key empirical moments, we conclude that deterrence elasticities with respect to sentence lengths are no more negative than 0 . 13 for young offenders.

Details

Regression Discontinuity Designs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-390-6

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Steve Dix and Ian Phau

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a scale (SITUZAP) to measure the situational factors that trigger channel switching, specifically within the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a scale (SITUZAP) to measure the situational factors that trigger channel switching, specifically within the television environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The domain construct is defined and 14 potential scale items were drawn from the literature and qualitative research. The scale was purified during the pilot phase and three scale items removed. The scale was re‐tested during the main study via an independent sample, confirming the two‐dimensional nature of the scale.

Findings

Reliability analysis indicates that the scale is internally consistent with co‐efficient alpha high across both pilot and main studies. Moreover, confirmatory factor analysis supports the two‐factor measurement model – “advertising triggers” and “RCD empowerment”. The test‐retest result (r=0.662) further provides evidence of stability within the scale. The scale has also been verified for content, criterion, discriminant, and nomological validity. All other indicators are within the acceptable range of statistics.

Originality/value

This is the first scale that measures the effect of situational factors on channel switching.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Barbara S. Tint, Viv McWaters and Raymond van Driel

The purpose of this paper is to introduce applied improvisation (AI) as a tool for training humanitarian aid workers. AI incorporates principles and practices from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce applied improvisation (AI) as a tool for training humanitarian aid workers. AI incorporates principles and practices from improvisational theatre into facilitation and training. It is an excellent modality for training aid workers to deal with crisis and disaster scenarios where decision-making and collaboration under pressure are critical.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a theoretical base for understanding skills needed in disaster response and provides a case for innovative training that goes beyond the current standard. AI principles, activities and case examples are provided. Interviews with development experts who have participated in AI training are excerpted to reveal the impact and promise of this methodology.

Findings

Different from typical training and games, which simulate potential crisis scenarios, AI works with participants in developing the skills necessary for success in disaster situations. The benefit is that workers are better prepared for the unexpected and unknown when they encounter it.

Research limitations/implications

The current paper is based on author observation, experience and participant interviews. While AI is consistently transformative and successful, it would benefit from more rigorous and structured research to ground the findings more deeply in larger evidence based processes.

Practical implications

The authors offer specific activities, resources for many others and practical application of this modality for training purposes.

Social implications

Its application has tremendous benefits in training for specific skills, in creating greater cohesion and satisfaction in work units and breaking down culture and language barriers.

Originality/value

This work is original in introducing these training methods to humanitarian aid contexts in general, and disaster preparedness and response in particular.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2019

Qian Chen, Yaobin Lu and Yeming Gong

Many service organizations use brand apps as an important mobile-end service channel and expect to increase brand app use through customer recommendations. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Many service organizations use brand apps as an important mobile-end service channel and expect to increase brand app use through customer recommendations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the internal mechanism of brand app recommendation from the cross-channel perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on value–satisfaction–loyalty (VSL) framework, this study examines how brand app’s unique cross-channel features influence customer recommendations, and the effect of involvement in the framework. The authors conduct a research survey in airline industry and questionnaires are developed and distributed to respondents who have experiences with air travel and have used the corresponding airlines’ brand apps. Finally, the authors collect 399 valid questionnaires to test the research model.

Findings

The results show that brand app usability mediates the relationship between offline service satisfaction and brand app satisfaction, which finally leads to brand app recommendation. Brand app usability and satisfaction significantly affect involvement, which also lead to brand app recommendation.

Originality/value

This study distinguishes the features of brand apps from those of ordinary apps and fills the research gap in the internal mechanism of app recommendation from the integrated cross-channel perspective. Besides, this study extends the VSL value in the context of brand app use. Based on the results, this study also provides the practical suggestions of enhancing offline service quality and brand app usability to increase brand app recommendation.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Stephen Brown

Retro-marketing is rampant. Throwback branding is burgeoning. Newstalgia is the next big thing. Yet marketing thinking is dominated by the forward-facing discourse of…

Abstract

Purpose

Retro-marketing is rampant. Throwback branding is burgeoning. Newstalgia is the next big thing. Yet marketing thinking is dominated by the forward-facing discourse of innovation. The purpose of this paper is to challenge innovation’s rhetorical hegemony by making an exemplar-based case for renovation.

Design/methodology/approach

If hindsight is the new foresight, then historical analyses can help us peer through a glass darkly into the future. This paper turns back time to the RMS Titanic, once regarded as the epitome of innovation, and offers a qualitative, narratological, culturally informed reading of a much-renovated brand.

Findings

In narrative terms, Titanic is a house of many mansions. Cultural research reveals that renovation and innovation, far from being antithetical, are bound together in a deathless embrace, like steamship and iceberg. It shows that, although the luxury liner sank more than a century ago, Titanic is a billion-dollar brand and a testament to renovation’s place in marketing’s pantheon. It contends that the unfathomable mysteries of the Titanic provide an apt metaphor for back-to-the-future brand management. It is a ship-shape simile heading straight for the iceberg called innovation. Survival is unlikely but the collision is striking.

Originality/value

This paper makes no claims to originality. On the contrary, it argues that originality is overrated. Renovation, rather, rules the waves. It is a time to renovate our thinking about innovation. The value of this paper inheres in that observation.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Janet Greco

Presents the results of research conducted with five groups of nurse executives from the Johnson & Johnson/Wharton Fellows Program in Nurse Management. Groups at the 1994…

Abstract

Presents the results of research conducted with five groups of nurse executives from the Johnson & Johnson/Wharton Fellows Program in Nurse Management. Groups at the 1994 and 1995 sessions conducted collaborative story enquiries into their own development as organizational politicians. In interviews months later, participants reported three kinds of outcome: change in themselves which can be characterized as development in political maturity; the collaborative story enquiries having worked in both expressive and explanatory ways to foster their learning and response; and understanding stories to be a powerful tool for learning and development.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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