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Article

Robin Miller and Steve Appleton

– The purpose of this paper is to explore integration and complexity through the evaluation of a case study service which supports multiply excluded homeless people.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore integration and complexity through the evaluation of a case study service which supports multiply excluded homeless people.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods theory based evaluation. Data gathering included semi-structured interviews with external stakeholders, analysis of referral and outcome data, focus groups with frontline staff members and managers, and interviews with people living in the service.

Findings

The service was highly rated by its stakeholders due to its ability to meet the immediate needs of many individuals and to facilitate access and engagement with community and specialist resources. However, not every individual responded to the support that was an offer, and a number were unable to access the service due to the nature of their needs or a lack of capacity in the service. Whilst the service was able to engage community and specialist services this often appeared to be within the parameters set by these services rather than flexibly around the needs of the individual.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based in one case study service and findings may not be transferable to different local contexts and providers. However, the findings are consistent with previous studies.

Practical implications

It is possible for commissioners to intervene in the complexities that multiply excluded homeless people experiences through the introduction of a new service. However, this is unlikely to address all of the gaps and fragmentation that people in these circumstances face. It is therefore important that partners are sensitive to such limitations and have a shared willingness to respond to continuing gaps and shortfalls.

Social implications

Despite specific national policies people continue to experience multiple exclusion homelessness which suggest that more still needs to be done to prevent people from this extremely disadvantaged social circumstance. Whilst specialist services can provide excellent support the response is still fragmented for some people meaning that work to better integrate their responses must continue.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the evidence base of support models for multiple excluded homeless people and the factors that can enable a housing support service to respond to such needs. It also provides comment on the relevance of the concept of complex adaptive systems to the study of integration.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article

Greg Filbeck, Dianna Preece, Stephen Woessner and Steve Burgess

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether community banks have gained market share at the expense of larger, regional banks in small metropolitan statistical areas…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether community banks have gained market share at the expense of larger, regional banks in small metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs). The authors also seek to examine market share gains of community banks relative to each other.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical research is conducted using deposit and market share data for community and regional banks between 2001 and 2008. The authors employ regression analysis.

Findings

It is found that community banks have gained market share. When regional banks are excluded and the market share gains of community banks relative to each other examined it is found that community banks with lower market shares gain relative to banks with a larger initial share of the deposit market.

Research limitations/implications

Research is conducted using eight metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa. Thus, conclusions drawn are based on analysis conducted in one region of the United States.

Practical implications

The paper's findings are in contrast to traditional thinking about size and market share and suggest that community bank managers should focus on each other as well as regional and mega‐bank competitors.

Originality/value

The paper uses market share as a proxy for bank size as a means of explaining the competitive landscape that exists within community banking.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to…

Abstract

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to uncover specific articles devoted to certain topics. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume III, in addition to the annotated list of articles as the two previous volumes, contains further features to help the reader. Each entry within has been indexed according to the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus and thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid information retrieval. Each article has its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. The first Volume of the Bibliography covered seven journals published by MCB University Press. This Volume now indexes 25 journals, indicating the greater depth, coverage and expansion of the subject areas concerned.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article

Steve O. Michael, Edward A. Holdaway and James M. Small

Describes the perceptions of administrators of post‐secondaryinstitutions in Alberta with respect to various aspects of theresource‐environment of their institutions…

Abstract

Describes the perceptions of administrators of post‐secondary institutions in Alberta with respect to various aspects of the resource‐environment of their institutions. While administrators of post‐secondary institutions in Alberta are divided on the issue of government funding ideology, the vast majority of them agreed that the attitude of the government to funding was changing. Other problems of concern to these administrators include the lack of public awareness of the true situation in their institutions, the growing competition among post‐secondary institutions, and the unpredictable funding direction from the government. Recommends a clear funding direction with multi‐year budget plan and internal restructuring to prepare for an increasingly competitive environment.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

Steve New, Ken Green and Barbara Morton

This paper examines differences and similarities between private and public sectors regarding green supply: the incorporation of environmental considerations into…

Abstract

This paper examines differences and similarities between private and public sectors regarding green supply: the incorporation of environmental considerations into procurement and supply chain relationships. While there are considerable differences between the sectors, there are two key areas of similarity. Firstly, responses in both sectors are heavily influenced by organisational structure and patterns of decision-making and information flow. Secondly, the success of green supply initiatives appears to be heavily dependent on organisation’s ability to align activity with dominant corporate objectives.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article

Christopher A. Dodd, Ian Clarke, Steve Baron and Vicky Houston

Fashion retailers are increasingly attempting to categorise fashion clothing according to their perceptions of consumer motivations. However, much of the research in this…

Abstract

Fashion retailers are increasingly attempting to categorise fashion clothing according to their perceptions of consumer motivations. However, much of the research in this area centres around economic and demographic considerations, disregarding the social and psychological significance of fashion clothing as a means of forming group identity and differentiation. Knowledge of the form and frequency of these group dynamics involved in fashion clothing purchasing will, potentially, have important implications for retailers and marketers alike. The paper considers prevalent theories on the development of social identification, the role of fashion in facilitating these formations (through the semiotic conveyance and interpretation of information), and the mediating role of culture and lifestyle determinants. The relationship of these theoretical underpinnings to the social interactions of the apparel consumer is explored through the construction of an incipient conceptual framework, underlying the cyclical but capricious nature of clothing choice. Implications for future research are identified.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Documents from and on Economic Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-450-8

Abstract

Details

The Catalyst Effect
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-551-3

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