Search results

1 – 10 of over 7000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Changbao Lu, Hang Li and Taoran Xu

Almost every consumer has many experiences of sales promotion and different stereotypes of it. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the model of sales promotion…

Abstract

Purpose

Almost every consumer has many experiences of sales promotion and different stereotypes of it. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the model of sales promotion stereotype content (model of SPSC) and its perception differences among groups.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the methods testifying stereotype content model and mixed stereotype proposed by Fiske et al. (2002), the authors decomposed the SPSC model into two dimensions, namely, the profitability and authenticity of sales promotion, and developed a multidimensional scale for profitability and authenticity. Then a survey that examined 765 participants was conducted to test the reliability of profitability and authenticity as the two primary dimensions of the model of SPSC and perception differences among consumer groups.

Findings

The model which consists of two dimensions, authenticity and profitability, was shown to be reliable and valid. Furthermore, the authors find that the profitability and the authenticity reflect consumers' evaluation (perception) of an enterprise's intention and its ability to enact the intention of sales promotion. In addition, mixed stereotypes of promotion can also explain consumers' entanglement when making promotion decisions.

Originality/value

This paper fills the gap in the existing literature of which the single dimension stereotype of sales promotion by the model of SPSC. In addition, the results show that consumers' stereotype of promotion varied in demographics and psychographic characteristics. Furthermore, this paper provides a basis for exploring the social stereotypes of specific things and related marketing activities.

Details

Journal of Contemporary Marketing Science, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7480

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Adamantios Diamantopoulos, Ilona Szőcs, Arnd Florack, Živa Kolbl and Martin Egger

Drawing on the stereotype content model (SCM), the authors investigate the stereotype content transfer (in terms of warmth and competence) from country to brand and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the stereotype content model (SCM), the authors investigate the stereotype content transfer (in terms of warmth and competence) from country to brand and the simultaneous impact of these two stereotypes on consumer responses toward brands.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test a structural equation model conceptualizing brand stereotypes as full mediators between country stereotypes and consumer outcomes. In addition, in a moderated mediation analysis, the authors investigate the role of brand typicality and utilitarianism/hedonism in potentially moderating the country to brand stereotype content transfer.

Findings

Country warmth and competence, respectively, impact brand warmth and competence, thus confirming the hypothesized stereotype content transfer. This transfer is found to be robust and not contingent on brands' perceived typicality of their country of origin. However, brands' utilitarian nature amplifies the positive impact of country competence on brand competence. Finally, brand stereotypes fully mediate the impact of country stereotypes on consumers' brand attitudes and behavioral intentions.

Originality/value

The authors provide the first empirical attempt that (1) explicitly differentiates between consumers' stereotypical perceptions of countries and stereotypical perceptions of brands from these countries, (2) empirically examines the transfer of stereotypical dimensions of different targets (i.e. country to brand), (3) explores boundary conditions for such transfer and (4) simultaneously considers the impact of both kinds of stereotypes on managerially relevant consumer outcomes.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2019

Vasileios Davvetas and Georgios Halkias

The dominant paradigm in international branding research treats perceived brand globalness (PBG) and localness (PBL) as attributes algebraically participating in brand…

Downloads
2325

Abstract

Purpose

The dominant paradigm in international branding research treats perceived brand globalness (PBG) and localness (PBL) as attributes algebraically participating in brand assessment and disregards the perception of brands as humanlike entities actively embedded in consumers’ social environments. Challenging this view and drawing from stereotype theory, the purpose of this paper is to suggest that PBG/PBL trigger the categorization of products under the superordinate mental categories of global/local brands which carry distinct stereotypical content. Such content transfers to every individual product for which category membership is established and shapes brand responses.

Design/methodology/approach

One experimental study (Study1, n=134) tests the process of global/local brand stereotype formation, identification and content transfer. Subsequently, two consumer surveys test the impact of brand stereotypes on brand approach/avoidance tendencies (Study2, n=328) and consumer–brand relationships (Study3, n=273). Data were analyzed with experimental techniques and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings suggest that upon categorization under the global or local brand class, individual brands are charged with the stereotypical content of the class. Global brands are predominantly stereotyped as competent while local brands are predominantly stereotyped as warm. Localness-induced warmth has uniformly positive effects, whereas globalness-induced competence acts as a double-edged sword which can both help and harm the brand.

Originality/value

This research contributes by proposing a novel conceptualization of global and local brands as groups of intentional marketplace agents stereotyped along their intentions and abilities, empirically establishing the process through which individual brands are assigned stereotypical judgments and demonstrating how these judgments impact critical brand outcomes and consumer–brand relationships.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2021

Petar Gidaković and Vesna Zabkar

Longitudinal studies have shown that consumer satisfaction has increased over the last 15 years, whereas trust and loyalty have decreased during the same period. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Longitudinal studies have shown that consumer satisfaction has increased over the last 15 years, whereas trust and loyalty have decreased during the same period. This finding contradicts the trust–value–loyalty model (TVLM), which posits that higher satisfaction increases consumers' trust, value and loyalty levels. To explain this counterintuitive trend, this study draws on models of trust formation to integrate the stereotype content model and the TVLM. It argues that consumers' occupational and industry stereotypes influence their trust, value and loyalty judgments through their trusting beliefs regarding frontline employees and management practices/policies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted among 476 consumers who were randomly assigned to one of five service industries (apparel retail, airlines, hotels, health insurance or telecommunications services) and asked to rate their current service provider from that industry.

Findings

The results suggest that both occupational and industry stereotypes influence consumers' trusting beliefs and trust judgments, although only the effects of industry stereotypes are transferred to consumers' loyalty judgments.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the study indicate that industry stereotypes have become increasingly negative over the last decades, which has a dampening effect on the positive effects of satisfaction.

Practical implications

This study provides guidelines for practitioners regarding the management of frontline employees and the development of consumer trust, value and loyalty.

Originality/value

This is the first study to propose and test an explanation for the counterintuitive trend concerning customer satisfaction, trust and loyalty. It is also the first to examine the roles of multiple stereotypes in the relationship between consumers and service providers.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Justin Marcus, Barbara Ann Fritzsche, Huy Le and Michael Dennis Reeves

– The purpose of this paper is to focus on developing and validating a multidimensional measure of work-related age-based stereotypes (WAS) scale.

Downloads
1044

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on developing and validating a multidimensional measure of work-related age-based stereotypes (WAS) scale.

Design/methodology/approach

Based upon a review of the literature, a three-dimensional stereotype content model including both negative (incompetence, inadaptability) and positive (warmth) stereotypes of older workers was created. Construct, convergent, discriminant, and criterion-related validity for the WAS scale were examined across three independent samples constituting both lab-based experimental studies and a field-based survey (total n=1,245).

Findings

Across all samples, the WAS evidenced good construct, convergent, discriminant, and criterion-related validity.

Originality/value

As evidenced by a review of the literature, the WAS is unique in that it measures both negative and positive stereotypes of older workers. Implications for research are discussed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Katherine M. Ryan, Eden B. King and Lisa M. Finkelstein

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of age-related stereotyping processes on younger workers’ mood, attitudes, and impression management behaviors at work.

Downloads
2954

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of age-related stereotyping processes on younger workers’ mood, attitudes, and impression management behaviors at work.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data from 281 younger workers, the hypothesized model was tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

As younger workers are more self-conscious about being age stereotyped, they are less likely to be satisfied with older co-workers, which is partly explained by negative mood associated with that metastereotype consciousness. Also, chronological age, age-group identification, and age prejudice, were critical influences on the emergence of metastereotype consciousness.

Research limitations/implications

Unexpected findings point to: experiences of younger workers which may not follow the same patterns found with older groups and unique operation of age as a dynamic social category that may not parallel findings regarding other social categories.

Practical implications

There is clearly potential for younger workers to be concerned they are viewed “stereotypically” and this metastereotype consciousness influences how they feel, think, and behave at work. Organizations should be aware of the potential antecedents and consequences, as well as the nature of metastereotypic perceptions, to better facilitate positive and productive interactions across age groups at work.

Originality/value

This research contributes to an understanding of younger workers’ experiences at work, highlights the role of mood in the operation of metastereotypes on attitudes and behaviors in age-diverse contexts, and improves our understanding of social biases and inequality associated with age-based groups.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Michael Chattalas, Thomas Kramer and Hirokazu Takada

The purpose of this paper is to advances a conceptual framework in which the impact of national stereotype dimensions on country of origin (COO) effects is explicitly…

Downloads
14166

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advances a conceptual framework in which the impact of national stereotype dimensions on country of origin (COO) effects is explicitly modeled and decomposed.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes that the perceived warmth and perceived competence dimensions of national stereotypes underlie COO effects. The conceptual framework posits research propositions on the potential interactions of these dimensions with product type (such as hedonic versus utilitarian and high‐ versus low‐contact services), while the effects of consumer characteristics (such as cultural orientation, expertise, involvement, and ethnocentrism) are explored.

Findings

The Stereotype Content Model is a useful tool in exploring the relationship between national stereotypes and COO‐based evaluations as it represents a major theoretical advance in the systematic study of stereotype contents.

Practical implications

The advanced conceptual framework holds significant practical implications for the international marketing strategies of corporations as well as nations.

Originality/value

This paper proposes an original conceptualization and testable research propositions regarding the relationship between national stereotype contents and COO‐based consumer evaluations of products.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Charlott Menke

Research has found that stereotypes affect occupational choices, but there has been almost no research on how they specifically affect the choice of becoming an…

Abstract

Research has found that stereotypes affect occupational choices, but there has been almost no research on how they specifically affect the choice of becoming an entrepreneur. This study bridges different fields of research by combining theories on entrepreneurial intent, self-esteem, and stereotypes. The author argues that in situations of insufficient information individuals assess prospective careers in commercial and social entrepreneurship by means of stereotypes, and the author is the first to explore the influence of commercial and social entrepreneurial stereotypes on an individual’s intention to start a commercial (for-profit) or social (not for-profit) venture. The author uses the framework outlined by the stereotype content model to disclose the existence of distinct stereotypes for commercial and social entrepreneurs exist and, thereafter, the author analyzes the influences of both entrepreneurial stereotypes on the specific startup intentions. The author test the hypotheses with unique survey data from a sample of German non-entrepreneurs which reveals that commercial entrepreneurs are seen as competent but cold, whereas social entrepreneurs are regarded as warm but incompetent. Using structural equation modeling and multi-group analysis, the data implies that higher levels of perceived warmth and competence of commercial entrepreneurs have a positive indirect effect on commercial startup intentions. No such effect was found for social startup intentions; however, the results indicate that a higher societal status of social entrepreneurs exerts a positive indirect impact on the intention to start a social business. The author discusses the practical implications of our approach and point out avenues for future research.

Details

The Entrepreneurial Behaviour: Unveiling the cognitive and emotional aspect of entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-508-6

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 February 2021

Andrea Strinić, Magnus Carlsson and Jens Agerström

The purpose of the current study is to investigate occupational stereotypes among a professional sample of recruiters and other employees on the two fundamental dimensions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the current study is to investigate occupational stereotypes among a professional sample of recruiters and other employees on the two fundamental dimensions of warmth and competence.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey to collect professionals´ (mostly recruiters´) ratings of preselected occupations. Participants were asked to rate warmth and competence attributes. Factor and cluster analysis were employed to investigate the two-dimensional structure of the warmth/competence space and how and whether occupations cluster as predicted by the stereotype content model (SCM).

Findings

Almost all occupations showed a clear two-factorial structure, corresponding to the warmth/competence dimensions. A five-cluster solution was deemed appropriate as depicting how occupations disperse on these dimensions. Implications for stereotyping research, the design of hiring discrimination experiments, and HRM are discussed.

Originality/value

In contrast to previous related research, in which participants select the included occupations themselves, the authors included prespecified common occupations, which should be important for representativeness. In addition, previous research has been conducted in the United States, while the authors conduct this study in a European context (Sweden). Finally, instead of studying students or participants with unspecified work experience, the authors focus on professionals (mostly recruiters).

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Milena Micevski, Adamantios Diamantopoulos and Jennifer Erdbrügger

This paper aims to draw from the stereotype content model (SCM) to investigate the mediating role of country-triggered emotions on the relationship between country…

Downloads
2842

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to draw from the stereotype content model (SCM) to investigate the mediating role of country-triggered emotions on the relationship between country stereotypes and intentions to visit a country as well as the boundary conditions under which such mediation occurs.

Design/methodology/approach

Two-hundred and eighty-three consumers participated in a between-subjects, Web-based study conducted in Hungary. Participants were randomly exposed to one out of six countries that are among the most popular tourist destinations for Hungarian consumers. Moderated-mediation analysis was performed to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

Country stereotypes of competence and warmth positively influence country-related emotions of admiration which, subsequently, transfer to consumer intentions to visit the focal country as a tourism destination. This mediation is moderated by consumers’ extraversion, such that intentions to visit are greater for highly extraverted consumers.

Research limitations/implications

Policymakers should take into consideration both the country stereotype and related emotions triggered by this stereotype when developing and promoting the country destination brand. Practitioners should also consider extraversion as a potential personality-based segmentation and targeting variable when communicating a country as a destination brand.

Originality/value

This study delineates the link between country stereotype and affective responses to this stereotype, thus further adding to our understanding of the role that emotions play in determining tourism behavior. It also highlights the role of the personality trait of extraversion as a moderating influence on the stereotype-emotions-visit intentions link.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 7000