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Book part
Publication date: 4 January 2019

Thomas D. Dowdell, David N. Herda, Mina J. Pizzini and Laura Trude

This study examines the scholarly output of accounting researchers in the periods surrounding a change in university affiliation. Our expectation that publishing activity…

Abstract

This study examines the scholarly output of accounting researchers in the periods surrounding a change in university affiliation. Our expectation that publishing activity will increase in periods around an institutional change is based on expectancy theories and informed by studies on the contract year performances of professional athletes. Using a sample of 635 accounting professors who switched universities between 2008 and 2014, the authors find evidence that accounting authors who switch universities publish more in the years around a switch compared with other years. Our research contributes to the literature on changes in university affiliation by documenting a contract year phenomenon operating within accounting academia. Practical implications for college administrators are also discussed.

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Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-540-1

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Stephen A. Woods, Nick Diprose, Mary Murphy-Diprose and Geoff Thomas

This paper reviews literature on interim leadership and management through the lens of effective interim performance. The purpose of this review is to advance…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reviews literature on interim leadership and management through the lens of effective interim performance. The purpose of this review is to advance understanding of interim assignment performance and the antecedent individual psychological characteristics of effective interim leaders and managers, to improve the practice of managing interim leaders from a human resources (HR) perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports a targeted review of the literature on interim leadership and management.

Findings

The main proposition from this review is that the influence of individual factors on interim performance operates within the stages and contexts of assignments. Accordingly, the authors propose a framework of the demands on interim assignments (the interim assignment cycle), comprising stages of preparation, entry, delivery and exit. The paper subsequently reviews evidence of the potential individual characteristics (focussing on individual differences in personality, leadership approach, motivation and competencies) of effective preparation and entry to an assignment, actions and performance during an assignment and exit/disengagement.

Practical implications

The findings of the review have implications for the selection and placement of interims into organizations and their management once appointed.

Originality/value

The main original contribution of the paper is to provide a framework around which interim assignments can be modelled and better understood. The paper discusses implications for future research, theory and human resource management practice and calls for a renewed research effort in this critical area of management and leadership.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2018

Rebecca J. Jones, Stephen A. Woods and Ying Zhou

In order to address the need for greater understanding about the occupational and practice determinants of effective workplace coaching, the purpose of this paper is to…

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Abstract

Purpose

In order to address the need for greater understanding about the occupational and practice determinants of effective workplace coaching, the purpose of this paper is to examine the associations of two coaching practice factors (coaching format and external vs internal coaching provision), and coachees’ job complexity with perceived outcomes from coaching.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 161 individuals who had received workplace coaching was conducted. Participants provided data on two outcome criteria (self-reported work well-being and personal effectiveness at work).

Findings

Analysis indicated that external coaches and blended format coaching were most strongly associated with work well-being outcomes. The examination of interaction effects showed that coaching provided by external coaches was more strongly associated with outcomes for individuals working in the most complex job roles.

Originality/value

The original contribution of the authors’ findings is in terms of the implications for coaches, managers and HR practitioners by showing how coaching can be implemented differentially and most effectively based on desired outcome criteria and features of coachees’ job situations.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 33 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2016

Alexandra L. Ferrentino, Meghan L. Maliga, Richard A. Bernardi and Susan M. Bosco

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications…

Abstract

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications in business-ethics and accounting’s top-40 journals this study considers research in eight accounting-ethics and public-interest journals, as well as, 34 business-ethics journals. We analyzed the contents of our 42 journals for the 25-year period between 1991 through 2015. This research documents the continued growth (Bernardi & Bean, 2007) of accounting-ethics research in both accounting-ethics and business-ethics journals. We provide data on the top-10 ethics authors in each doctoral year group, the top-50 ethics authors over the most recent 10, 20, and 25 years, and a distribution among ethics scholars for these periods. For the 25-year timeframe, our data indicate that only 665 (274) of the 5,125 accounting PhDs/DBAs (13.0% and 5.4% respectively) in Canada and the United States had authored or co-authored one (more than one) ethics article.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-973-2

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Stephen A. Woods, Michael James Mustafa, Neil Anderson and Benjamin Sayer

The literature on individual differences in innovative work behavior (IWB) reveals inconsistencies in the relations of personality traits and tenure on innovation at work…

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Abstract

Purpose

The literature on individual differences in innovative work behavior (IWB) reveals inconsistencies in the relations of personality traits and tenure on innovation at work. To provide greater clarity about the effects of these antecedents, the purpose of this paper is to report a study of the moderating effects of tenure on the associations of traits and IWB, and apply a theoretical lens based on the trait-activation theory.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 146 employees of a UK-based financial institution completed measures of conscientiousness and openness, and had three aspects of IWB (idea generation, promotion, and realization) rated by their line-supervisor. All participants were on graduate training programs. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the moderating effects of tenure on the associations of the self-reported traits with the supervisor-rated IWB outcomes.

Findings

Tenure moderated the effects of conscientiousness on IWB, with highly conscientious employees being less innovative with longer tenure. Tenure moderated the effect of openness with idea generation with highly open employees generating more ideas if they were longer tenured.

Practical implications

Management of innovation requires differentiated strategies based on the personality traits and tenure of individual employees. Implications for recruitment, socialization and development are discussed.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine empirically the interactions of traits and contextual factors (i.e. organizational tenure) on IWB, framed around a strong theoretical foundation (i.e. trait activation theory). The study also makes notable contributions by measuring innovative behavior using a supervisor-rated and multidimensional approach.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2016

Daryl M. Guffey

This paper ranks university faculties, accounting doctoral programs, individual behavioral accounting researchers, and the most influential articles based on Google…

Abstract

This paper ranks university faculties, accounting doctoral programs, individual behavioral accounting researchers, and the most influential articles based on Google Scholar citations to publications in Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research (AABR). All articles published in AABR in its first 15 volumes are included and four citation metrics are used. The paper identifies the articles, authors, faculties, and doctoral programs that made the greatest contribution to the development of AABR. Such an analysis provides a useful basis for understanding the direction the journal has taken and how it has contributed to the literature (Meyer & Rigsby, 2001). The h-index and m-index for AABR indicates it compares favorably among its peers. Potential doctoral students with an interest in behavioral accounting research, “new” accounting faculty with an interest in behavioral accounting research, current behavioral accounting research faculty, department chairs, deans, and other administrators will find these results informative.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-977-0

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Stephen A. Woods, Fiona C. Patterson, Anna Koczwara and Juilitta A. Sofat

The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of personality traits of the Big Five model on training outcomes to help explain variation in training effectiveness.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of personality traits of the Big Five model on training outcomes to help explain variation in training effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Associations of the Big Five with self-reported learning following training were tested in a pre- and post-design in a field sample of junior medical practitioners (N = 99), who attended a training workshop on self-awareness. Associations are reported of personality traits with post-training learning measured immediately following the workshop and one-month later controlling for pre-training learning.

Findings

Conscientiousness was related to post-training learning at both times. None of the remaining Big Five factors were associated with post-training learning.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to the literature on personality and training outcomes, clarifying the associations of traits with outcomes in a pre-and-post design. Although the study sample has limitations, the findings have implications for numerous lines of future research, in particular in understanding the role of training in relations of personality and job performance.

Practical implications

Practitioners should consider ways to encourage training participants to approach training conscientiously. Personality assessment might help people reflect on their approach to learning to adapt it during training.

Originality/value

No study has previously examined the role of personality traits in training outcomes using a pre- and post-design. The role of conscientiousness in workplace learning is underlined by the findings. While dimensions such as openness and extraversion may encourage people to participate in training, conscientiousness may make the difference in promoting internalized individual development and change following training.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2017

Maria Karanika-Murray, George Michaelides and Stephen J. Wood

Research into job design and employee outcomes has tended to examine job design in isolation of the wider organizational context, leading to calls to attend to the context…

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1389

Abstract

Purpose

Research into job design and employee outcomes has tended to examine job design in isolation of the wider organizational context, leading to calls to attend to the context in which work is embedded. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of the interaction between job design and psychological climate on job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Cognitive dissonance theory was used to explore the nature of this relationship and its effect on job satisfaction. The authors hypothesized that psychological climate (autonomy, competence, relatedness dimensions) augments favorable perceptions of job demands and control when there is consistency between them (augmentation effect) and compensates for unfavorable perceptions when they are inconsistent (compensation effect).

Findings

Analysis of data from 3,587 individuals partially supported the hypotheses. Compensation effects were observed for job demands under a high autonomy and competence climate and for job control under a low competence climate. Augmentation effects were observed for job demands under a high relatedness climate.

Practical implications

When designing jobs managers should take into account the effects of psychological climate on employee outcomes.

Originality/value

This study has offered a way to bridge the job design and psychological climate fields and demonstrated that the call for more attention to the context in which jobs are embedded is worth heeding.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1981

Stephen Wood

Covent Garden and Les Halles have three things in common: In the sixties they were both dominated by busy wholesale markets, by the seventies the produce markets had moved…

Abstract

Covent Garden and Les Halles have three things in common: In the sixties they were both dominated by busy wholesale markets, by the seventies the produce markets had moved out, and by 1980 both sites had been transformed, but in very different ways. Stephen Wood compares the development of these two exciting ventures in a paper presented to the PTRC Summer Annual Meeting at Warwick.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1990

Stephen Wood and Riccardo Peccei

Increased product and labour market pressures arising from the Single European Market (SEM) are far more im‐portant to Personnel Managers than the Social Charter or any…

Abstract

Increased product and labour market pressures arising from the Single European Market (SEM) are far more im‐portant to Personnel Managers than the Social Charter or any pan‐European legislation.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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