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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2010

Stephen L. Vargo, Robert F. Lusch, Melissa Archpru Akaka and Yi He

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Stephen J. Grove, Raymond P. Fisk and Joby John

Over the past two and a half decades services marketing has emerged as a well established area of inquiry in the marketing discipline. In many ways, its growth and…

Abstract

Over the past two and a half decades services marketing has emerged as a well established area of inquiry in the marketing discipline. In many ways, its growth and acceptance in the academic arena are indeed noteworthy. A question arises, however, concerning the direction that services marketing as a field of study should take in the future. This article reports and content‐analyzes the insights of ten leading services scholars regarding that question. That group comprises Leonard Berry, Mary Jo Bitner, David Bowen, Stephen W. Brown, Christian Gro¨nroos, Evert Gummesson, Christopher Lovelock, Parsu Parasuraman, Benjamin Schneider, and Valarie Zeithaml. Recurring themes and provocative observations among the services experts’ comments are related and discussed. Concluding remarks are offered.

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Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Stephen W. Brown, Raymond P. Fisk and Mary Jo Bitner

Offers the personal interpretations of authors as participant‐observerstogether with a data‐based analysis of the evolution of the servicesmarketing literature…

Abstract

Offers the personal interpretations of authors as participant‐observers together with a data‐based analysis of the evolution of the services marketing literature. Bibliographic analysis of more than 1,000 English language, general services marketing publications, spanning four decades, provides an additional resource. Using an evolutionary metaphor as the framework, traces the literature through three stages: Crawling Out (1953‐79): Scurrying About (1980‐85); and Walking Erect (1986‐present). Shows how the literature has evolved from the early services‐marketing‐is‐different debate to the maturation of specific topics (e.g. service quality, service encounters) and the legitimization of the services marketing literature by major journals. Presents a classification and summary of publications and authors. Closes with discussion and speculation on the future of the services marketing literature.

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International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Martin D. Goslar and Stephen W. Brown

Information technology has made possible the recognition, acquisition, organization, and controlled retention of data from sources virtually unavailable in the past. Terms…

Abstract

Information technology has made possible the recognition, acquisition, organization, and controlled retention of data from sources virtually unavailable in the past. Terms such as “the information society” and “information glut” have become commonplace. High‐level corporate positions with titles such as Chief Information Officer are being created in an attempt to efficiently and effectively use information for the benefit of the organization and the society it serves. A major challenge in the 1980s is to gain and maintain the ability to use this information for competitive advantage. Decision Support Systems (DSS) enable marketing managers to integrate internal and external information environments within a decision‐making context. Useful features available within Marketing Information Systems can be incorporated with the potentials of DSS. Together the two systems can provide marketing managers with opportunities to anticipate, identify, and creatively respond to changing consumer demand.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Stephen W. Brown, Ray M. Haynes and Donald L. Saunders

Service innovations require a revitalising process to be viableover time. Both provider and customer satisfaction must be associatedwith these innovations to assure their…

Abstract

Service innovations require a revitalising process to be viable over time. Both provider and customer satisfaction must be associated with these innovations to assure their continuing success. A framework and a model for service revitalisation are developed and then illustrated through examining the past and potential future of one of the world′s more prominent service innovations, the automated teller.

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International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Dwayne D. Gremler and Stephen W. Brown

The influence of loyal customers can reach far beyond their proximate impact on the company. This impact is analogous to the ripple caused by a pebble tossed into a still…

Abstract

The influence of loyal customers can reach far beyond their proximate impact on the company. This impact is analogous to the ripple caused by a pebble tossed into a still pond. In this article we introduce the loyalty ripple effect construct and define it as the influence, both direct and indirect, customers have on a firm through (1) generating interest in the firm by encouraging new customer patronage or (2) other actions or behaviours that create value for the organization. That is, in addition to their revenue stream, we suggest loyal customers may engage in several behaviours, including word‐of‐mouth communication, that add value to or reduce costs for the firm. In our discussion, we provide some examples to illustrate our point and conduct an exploratory study related to arguably the most salient ripple generator, word‐of‐mouth communication. The paper concludes with managerial implications and provides some suggestions for future research.

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International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Ruth N. Bolton and Crina O. Tarasi

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Bård Tronvoll, Stephen W. Brown, Dwayne D. Gremler and Bo Edvardsson

Recent discussions of the service‐dominant logic (S‐D logic) and the creation of a multidisciplinary service science highlight the need for a paradigmatic discussion that…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent discussions of the service‐dominant logic (S‐D logic) and the creation of a multidisciplinary service science highlight the need for a paradigmatic discussion that provides directions for ongoing service research. This article aims to examine different epistemological foundations and proposes a framework to describe and better understand the development and future of service research.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the proposed framework, an assessment of 60 selected award‐winning and most cited articles is categorized using the paradigmatic framework.

Findings

Four paradigms are found to be prominent in service research: positivistic, hermeneutic, dialogic, and monologic. The positivistic option has been the dominant paradigm employed by service scholars, suggesting service scholars need to apply the three alternative paradigms more as a means to enrich and extend the service research discipline.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to discuss the fundamental beliefs and worldviews (ontological and epistemological positions) guiding service research. Paradigms are critical determinants and drivers of good research.

Originality/value

A new framework for analyzing paradigmatic foundations in service research and directions for the future design of service research studies is proposed. The suggested framework could inspire scholars to reflect on their ontological and epistemological foundations and provide paradigmatic guidance within service research. This provides a basis for continuous expansion of the service research field.

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Journal of Service Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Dwayne D. Gremler, Kevin P. Gwinner and Stephen W. Brown

In this study, we hypothesize and empirically test the proposition that interpersonal bonds, or relationships between employees and customers, can significantly influence…

Abstract

In this study, we hypothesize and empirically test the proposition that interpersonal bonds, or relationships between employees and customers, can significantly influence positive word‐of‐mouth (WOM) communication. Such influence may be especially true for many services, particularly in situations where a relationship has developed between the customer and individual service providers. In this study we look at four dimensions of interpersonal bonds: trust, care, rapport, and familiarity. We contend that as a customer’s trust increases in a specific employee (or employees), positive WOM communication about the organization is more likely to increase and such trust is a consequence of three other interpersonal relationship dimensions: a personal connection between employees and customers, care displayed by employees, and employee familiarity with customers. These propositions are investigated using data collected from bank customers and dental patients, and we find empirical support for all but one of our hypotheses. A key finding is that the presence of interpersonal relationships between employees and customers is significantly correlated with customer WOM behavior. We conclude with a discussion of how interpersonal relationships between customers and employees might be fostered in order to increase the likelihood of customer WOM behavior.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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