Search results

1 – 10 of 43
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Stephen Toomey

Provide a background to the management, the strategies and theissues facing a charter airline. Explains how information technology(IT) has helped British Caledonian Airways to be…

350

Abstract

Provide a background to the management, the strategies and the issues facing a charter airline. Explains how information technology (IT) has helped British Caledonian Airways to be successful since it was formed by the merger of the charter operations of British Airways and British Caledonian in 1988.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Stephen M. Croucher, Stephanie Kelly, Hui Chen and Doug Ashwell

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between face concerns, articulated (upward) dissent and organizational assimilation. In this study, articulated dissent…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between face concerns, articulated (upward) dissent and organizational assimilation. In this study, articulated dissent was conceptualized as a type of dissent.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was distributed to 370 working adults in the USA via Qualtrics. The questionnaire measured five face concerns, namely, self, other and mutual-face, articulated dissent and organizational assimilation. Before hypothesis testing, each measure was subjected to a confirmatory factor analysis to ensure that the hypothesized factor structure held. Pearson correlation and ordinary least squares estimation were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Conceptualizing dissent as a type of conflict, the findings of the current study are as follows: self-face and assimilation are positively correlated, other-face and assimilation are positively correlated, mutual-face and assimilation are positively correlated, assimilation and articulated dissent are positively correlated and organizational assimilation mediated the relationship between mutual-face and articulated dissent.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretically, the self-presentation process (face) is more critical as a person becomes part of an organization; it is through assimilating into an organization that members become familiar with the norms of an organization and more comfortable dissenting to their superiors (articulated dissent); and the more the authors integrate with the work colleagues the more the authors engage in mutual face-saving.

Practical implications

The results of this study demonstrate that self-presentation is critical as a person becomes part of an organization, particularly when it comes to managing conflict.

Originality/value

This is the first study to link facework with organizational dissent. The results add to the understanding of how face affects whether we choose to express this kind of conflict behavior.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Stephen M. Croucher, Kyle J. Holody, Manda V. Hicks, Deepa Oommen and Alfred DeMaris

This study sets out to examine conflict style preferences in India and the predictive effects of various demographic variables on conflict style preference.

3044

Abstract

Purpose

This study sets out to examine conflict style preferences in India and the predictive effects of various demographic variables on conflict style preference.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered in India (n=827) among Muslims and Hindus. Conflict was measured using Oetzel's Conflict Style Measure. To answer the research questions, repeated measures ANOVA and multiple regressions were conducted.

Findings

The findings reveal that conflict style preference among Hindus in India differs significantly and that Hindus prefer the integrating and dominating styles, whilst showing the least inclination towards the avoiding and obliging styles. Muslims prefer the integrating and compromising styles and least prefer the dominating and avoiding styles. Analyses of the demographic variables' predictive influence reveal that age and sex are significant predictors for all five conflict styles for both Muslims and Hindus. Education has a mixed predictive influence on conflict style among Hindus and Muslims.

Research limitations/implications

Use of self‐report instruments and the majority of the participants coming from middle‐class backgrounds could limit the generalizability of the study.

Practical implications

The study calls for conflict mediators to consider the influence of group membership and educational level on conflict management/resolution. The research also discusses national/international conflict intervention.

Social implications

This paper informs individuals regarding the way in which two large religious and cultural groups differ in their approaches to conflict. For a nation that has experienced a history of conflict between these two cultural/religious groups, this paper can help shed light on how to bridge the conflict between them.

Originality/value

There are no studies directly comparing the conflict styles of Muslims and Hindus.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Stephen Croucher

This study seeks to examine the influence of national and religious identification on conflict styles among Christians and Muslims in Western Europe.

3191

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine the influence of national and religious identification on conflict styles among Christians and Muslims in Western Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered in France, Germany and the UK (n=909) in 2008. Conflict was measured using Oetzel's Conflict Style Measure. To test the hypothesis and answer the research questions, multiple regression models were constructed.

Findings

National and religious identification had a significant influence on conflict style preference. Muslims prefer more compromising and obliging conflict styles, while Christians prefer the dominating style. France is more dominating than Germany or the UK. Significant interactions revealed how individuals' religion and national identification influence conflict styles.

Research limitations/implications

The use of self‐report instruments is the primary limitation.

Practical implications

Individuals' lived experiences have a significant influence on their conflict preference. The results in France, Germany and the UK point to varied ethnic and religious lived experiences.

Social implications

The primary social impact of this paper is that it informs individuals and governments of the effects of religion on individuals' management of conflict. In the wake of the bombings of September 11, the 2005 French riots, and the 2005 London bombings, understanding the potential influence of religion on the management and conceptualization of conflict offers vast societal impacts for society at large.

Originality/value

There are few studies in conflict that examine the influence of religion and/or national identification. Moreover, this is one of the few studies to examine how Muslims manage conflict.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Stephen Michael Croucher

– This paper aims to explore the relationships between self-construals, religious identification, and conflict styles in India.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationships between self-construals, religious identification, and conflict styles in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered in India (n=1,108) among Hindus (n=744) and Muslims (n=364) in various organizations throughout India. Conflict styles were measured using Oetzel's conflict style measure. Self-construal was measured using Singelis' self-construal measure. Pearson correlations and multiple regressions were conducted.

Findings

Correlation analysis showed significant negative correlation between the independent and interdependent self-construal. Multiple hierarchical regression modeling demonstrated significant interactions between religious identification, self-construal, and conflict style. Hindus are more likely to dominate in conflict situations, while Muslims are more likely to avoid conflict and prefer more group-oriented conflict styles.

Research limitations/implications

Self-report measure is a possible limitation and the sample is religiously homogeneous.

Practical implications

The results of this study could assist community organizers and others who work in conflict mediation resolve conflict among religious groups.

Originality/value

Few studies have examined conflict styles in India and this study employs a macro and micro-level approach to the study of conflict.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Stephen Swailes

A core assumption of exclusive talent management is that some employees have more talent than others. Performance data and talent reviews provide some support for this assumption…

Abstract

A core assumption of exclusive talent management is that some employees have more talent than others. Performance data and talent reviews provide some support for this assumption yet there are grounds thinking that a proportion of talent identification is false; average people can be included, talented people can excluded. In an exploration of how talent recognition is exposed to risk, this chapter considers two approaches to talent that are seldom treated together. First, the social construction of talent is developed in ways that highlight the dangers that inevitably arise in talent recognition processes. A social constructionist treatment raises the prospect of ‘empty’ talent pools and the chapter explores the ethical and moral issues arising and questions whether it matters that talent pools might be empty. Second, talent is considered as an innate characteristic of people highlighting that talents are not static and continue evolving up to a point. As such, and if so, it is right that organizations should look periodically for talent across their employee base. The chapter highlights areas for further research into the existence of ‘the talented’ in business contexts and in particular the question of how much talent pools actually contain people with above average talent. The practical implications of appreciating both social and natural bases of talent are considered.

Details

Managing Talent: A Critical Appreciation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-094-3

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2017

Abstract

Details

Engaging Dissonance: Developing Mindful Global Citizenship in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-154-4

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Meera Komarraju, Stephen J. Dollinger and Jennifer L. Lovell

This study aims to examine the role of horizontal and vertical individualism‐collectivism in explaining conflict management styles. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 640…

6504

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the role of horizontal and vertical individualism‐collectivism in explaining conflict management styles. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 640 respondents completed the Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory‐II (ROCI‐II, Form C) designed to assess five conflict management styles and the individualism‐collectivism (I‐C) scale designed to assess the vertical and horizontal aspects of individualism‐collectivism. Findings – Correlation and regression analyses provide support for a conceptual fit between cultural dimensions and conflict management styles. Horizontal and vertical aspects of individualism‐collectivism explained 5‐20 percent of the variance in the various conflict management styles. Specifically, individuals displaying an individualist orientation (horizontal and vertical) tended to give greater importance to satisfying personal needs and preferred a dominating style, rather than an obliging or avoiding style. In contrast, collectivists (horizontal and vertical) seemed more likely to sacrifice personal needs for the sake of the group and preferred an integrating style. Further, horizontal collectivists were more likely to prefer an obliging style and vertical collectivists an avoiding style of conflict management. Research limitations/implications – Generalization is limited to college student samples from the USA. Practical implications – Organizations could provide training programs to sensitize employees to their specific cultural orientations and their preferred conflict management styles. In addition, employees could learn to switch between styles depending on the situation, issue, or relationship within which the conflict is taking place. Originality/value – Highlights the importance of sensitizing employees to their cultural orientation and preferred conflict management style; raises the possibility of training them to develop alternate styles.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Roger J. Volkema

Perceptions of the appropriateness and likelihood of use of seventeen negotiation tactics were compared for current and future business professionals from Mexico and the United…

1084

Abstract

Perceptions of the appropriateness and likelihood of use of seventeen negotiation tactics were compared for current and future business professionals from Mexico and the United States. The results suggest differences in perceived appropriateness as well as in the gap between perceived appropriateness and likely use, consistent with the cultures of these two countries. The implications of these findings for cross‐national negotiations and future research are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

1 – 10 of 43