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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2020

Yahya Al-Saeed, David John Edwards and Stephen Scaysbrook

This paper aims to present a novel proof-of-concept framework for implementing building information modeling (BIM) Digital Objects (BDO) to automate construction product…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a novel proof-of-concept framework for implementing building information modeling (BIM) Digital Objects (BDO) to automate construction product manufacturers’ processes and augment lean manufacturing.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed interpretivist and post-positivist epistemological lens is adopted to pursue the proof-of-concept’s development. From an operational perspective, a synthesis of literature using interpretivism provides the foundation for deductive research inquiry implemented within a case study approach. Within the case study, participatory action research (PAR) is implemented to test the proof of concept via three “waterfall” research phases, namely, literature diagnosis and BIM package selection, BDO development and validation and evaluation.

Findings

The findings illustrate that a BDO (which represents the digital twin of manufacturing products) can augment and drive automation processes and workflows for construction product manufacturers within a contractor’s supply chain. The developed framework illustrates the benefits of a BDO, by reducing the number of manufacturing processes to effectively eliminate early errors in the model, generates financial savings and reduces material wastage.

Originality/value

This research provides a seminal case study that implements BDO to automate construction product manufacturing processes and demonstrates the utilisation of BDO at an operational (vis-à-vis theoretical) level. Future research is proposed to implement a longitudinal approach to measure and report upon the success (or otherwise) of the proof of concept when implemented on fabrications and shop floor procedures.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Yayha Al-Saeed, Erika Parn, David John Edwards and Stephen Scaysbrook

Construction manufacturers predominantly rely upon antiquated manual design and production processes and procedures because they lack technical skills needed to automate…

Abstract

Purpose

Construction manufacturers predominantly rely upon antiquated manual design and production processes and procedures because they lack technical skills needed to automate working practices. This paper aims to automate manufacturing processes by optimising the utilisation of BIM digital objects (BDO) via the development of a conceptual model. Concomitant objectives seek to reduce design errors; eliminate unnecessary costs; automate the generation of quantity bills; and maximise productivity performance.

Design/methodology/approach

An inductive approach was adopted through a post positivist epistemological lens set within the context of a case study of a small- and medium-sized enterprise. From an operational perspective, both qualitative and quantitative data were collected and analysed via a novel four-phase waterfall design, namely, literature diagnosis; recording contemporary practice; mapping manufacturing workflow and procedures; and evaluation and proof of concept development.

Findings

The work illustrates that BDO enhances manufacturing workflow, reduces product manufacturing lead time and augments quality assurance throughout the whole life cycle of a manufactured product. The conceptual model developed provides a pragmatic and comprehensive solution to automate construction manufacturing procedures and to improve the facilitation of information exchanged between all stakeholders involved.

Originality/value

This study presents the first comprehensive case study of BDO application within a manufacturing context. Future research is however, needed to test and validate the conceptual model presented in practice. In doing so, the model can be further refined using practitioner input and real-life manufacturing processes and procedures.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Stephen Emmitt

This paper seeks to investigate the theoretical and practical links between teaching and research in a teaching led university in the UK. Focus is on the new architectural…

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335

Abstract

This paper seeks to investigate the theoretical and practical links between teaching and research in a teaching led university in the UK. Focus is on the new architectural technology undergraduate programmes that, in theory at least, provide an opportunity to integrate activities. An extensive literature review demonstrated the benefit to both students and academic staff of incorporating research into the curriculum. The research used was centered on an innovative Level 3 undergraduate module, which was monitored for 48 months. The module was designed with the aim of encouraging architectural technology students to approach architectural detailing from first principles within an environmentally responsible framework. The philosophy behind the module was to incorporate lecturers’ research into the module, both to enhance the student experience and to narrow the gap between research and teaching. The module also sought to form a subject integrating role, bringing together management, technology and design via project work. A brief overview of the development of the module and the teaching and learning strategy is provided before looking at delivery and evolution of the module. The students’ evaluation of the module, via a questionnaire survey, is then reviewed and issues for further consideration highlighted. A number of observations are made relating to the integration of knowledge, which have implications for all contributors to construction education.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Kwok‐Po Stephen Cheng, Yan‐Lai How and Kit‐Lun Yick

Evaluates the mechanical properties of 60 different shirting materials: fabric extensibility, formability, shear rigidity, bending rigidity, relaxation shrinkage, and…

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735

Abstract

Evaluates the mechanical properties of 60 different shirting materials: fabric extensibility, formability, shear rigidity, bending rigidity, relaxation shrinkage, and hygral expansion by the adoption of the fabric assurance by simple testing (FAST) system. Investigates manufacturing processes comprising spreading, cutting, sewing, handling, pressing and packaging and correlates the measured properties of the shirting fabric with their actual performance during making up. Claims this overall evaluation of respective fabric performance enables manufacturers to identify the range of mechanical properties ideal for high‐quality shirt production. Adds that specific manufacturing instructions can be prepared, based on the results of fabric property evaluation, for fabrics which tend to present difficulties in production. Points out that these can considerably expedite the manufacture of garments, avoiding the alternative – expensive “trial and error” – solution to problems.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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