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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Stephen R.C. Wanhill

Examines the information determinants on the hammer price of a remarkable collection often vintages of Château Léoville‐Barton, spanning 1981–90, which came up for auction…

Abstract

Examines the information determinants on the hammer price of a remarkable collection often vintages of Château Léoville‐Barton, spanning 1981–90, which came up for auction at Christie's, South Kensington, during the early part of 1994. The vintage ratings of three leading wine writers and the Christie's guide prices were modelled as predictions of the hammer price. The results indicated that the auctioneer's guide prices had greatest explanatory power in terms of the variation in the hammer prices, but the vintage ratings provided by the wine authors were also significant

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2016

Abstract

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The World Meets Asian Tourists
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-219-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Szilvia Gyimóthy, Charlotte R. Rassing and Stephen Wanhill

Commencing in the late 1980s in Europe, regional development policy has seen a switch of emphasis from large automatic grants to attract inward investment projects…

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Abstract

Commencing in the late 1980s in Europe, regional development policy has seen a switch of emphasis from large automatic grants to attract inward investment projects, towards small and medium enterprises (SMEs) and indigenous growth. From a tourism perspective, this blends well with models of community tourism development, particularly in peripheral areas. The task of co‐ordinating local actions usually falls on public agencies, but development is often made doubly difficult because there is a dichotomy between the market stance of tourist bureaux and the supply‐oriented approach of small traders. Such is the case of the restaurant industry on Bornholm, which fails to match the expectations of the visitors in their menu structures. This article analyses the extent of the gap between demand and supply in terms of the visitors’ experiences.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Nicholas Catahan and Helen Woodruffe-Burton

This is an exploratory and qualitative study to consider approaches to capture, analyse and monitor perceptions from big data, to inform and contribute to place management…

Abstract

Purpose

This is an exploratory and qualitative study to consider approaches to capture, analyse and monitor perceptions from big data, to inform and contribute to place management research and practice of botanic gardens (BGs). This paper aims to address the ongoing significant threat to BGs due to funding being cut and the need to inform and develop sustainable revenue streams for their survival.

Design/methodology/approach

Guiding research questions for this study were: ‘What are the perceived strengths and areas for development for 2 BGs via a Leximancer Automatic Content Analysis (ACA) of TripAdvisor online reviews; and do they match BGs purpose of scientific research, conservation, display and education?’ A content analysis of 582 online reviews from 2007 to 2017 follows qualitative methodology techniques using a combination of manual and automatic text analysis (Leximancer text mining software). These approaches enabled a comparison of online TripAdvisor reviews with Likert-type or rating scale items of 1 to 5 stars.

Findings

Insights revealed the use of Leximancer and TripAdvisor (or similar innovations) as tools for potential place management, place marketing communications and monitoring purposes. Predominant perceptions extracted from reviews are not concerned with documented collections of living plants for the purposes of scientific discovery, conservation, display and education. Reviews clearly focus more upon aesthetics, facilities and services, which support previous studies. Overall, reviews highlighted positive sentiments towards the BGs.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations link to limited data across two BGs, synthesis and meaning of complex perceptions, matters of subjectivity and time needed to interpret information. Implications enable insights into BG “place” gleaned from big data in the form of user-generated content and electronic Word-Of-Mouth using Leximancer; viewed as a measure alongside management action plans. Future studies could strengthen debate and action regarding the use of Leximancer, and also public perception of BGs’ core functions, importance and value. The research supports potential to monitor and transform perceptions, values and beliefs. Outcomes could eventually inform policy and generate a much-needed shift in funds and resources for BGs by highlighting their relevance and value to society.

Originality/value

An empirical and methodological contribution via peer reviewed studies of visitor perceptions via online reviews of Britain’s BGs “place” and “space” analysed with Leximancer have never been published. This study critically explores potential visitor and place management needs of BGs. Managers can make better use of big data from social media platforms/digital channels, using a novel type of data analytical software like Leximancer for strategic planning; with more informed approaches to place management, innovation and development. A key contribution of this study is this ACA methodological approach for place management.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Delly Mahachi Chatibura

The purpose of this study is to review the critical success factors (CSFs) of street food destinations, given the limited attention awarded to such research in the food…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review the critical success factors (CSFs) of street food destinations, given the limited attention awarded to such research in the food and beverage sector.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretivist approach was used to merge CSFs from street vending and culinary tourism perspectives, to develop a draft framework for analysing CSFs for street food destinations. In total, 64 cities that appeared in the first 20 webpage results of a Google search, using 4 keywords, formed the population. A purposive sample of seven destinations (Bangkok, Marrakesh, Mexico City, Istanbul, Hong Kong, Portland and Singapore City) was used. A content analysis method was used to review webpages, journal articles and government reports of the destinations, based on the modified list of CSFs.

Findings

The availability of diverse street food resources and cultures, coupled with rich historic city cores that sustain street food vending, in some destinations, are very important CSFs. The presence and extent of regulatory enforcement were also key in others. Empirical research is, however, required to corroborate the draft framework to create a body of knowledge for further research in the field.

Originality/value

The study examines how leading street food destinations have instituted the CSFs required for street food provision.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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