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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Thomas J. Caruso, Juan Luis Sandin Marquez, Melanie S. Gipp, Stephen P. Kelleher and Paul J. Sharek

No studies have examined preoperative handoffs from the intensive care unit (ICU) to OR. Given the risk of patient harm, the authors developed a standardized ICU to OR…

Abstract

Purpose

No studies have examined preoperative handoffs from the intensive care unit (ICU) to OR. Given the risk of patient harm, the authors developed a standardized ICU to OR handoff using a previously published handoff model. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether a standardized ICU to OR handoff process would increase the number of team handoffs and improve patient transport readiness.

Design/methodology/approach

The intervention consisted of designing a multidisciplinary, face-to-face handoff between sending ICU providers and receiving anesthesiologist and OR nurse, verbally presented in the I-PASS format. Anticipatory calls from the OR nurse to the ICU nurse were made to prepare the patient for transport. Data collected included frequency of handoff, patient transport readiness, turnover time between OR cases, and anesthesia provider satisfaction.

Findings

In total, 57 audits were completed. The frequency of handoffs increased from 25 to 86 percent (p<0.0001) and the frequency of patient readiness increased from 61 to 97 percent (p=0.001). There were no changes in timeliness of first start cases and no significant change in turnover times between cases. Anesthesia provider satisfaction scores increased significantly.

Practical implications

A standardized, team based ICU to OR handoff increased the frequency of face-to-face handoffs, patient readiness and anesthesia provider satisfaction within increasing turnover between cases.

Originality/value

Although studies have identified the transition of patients from the ICU to the OR as a period of increased harm, the development of a preoperative ICU to OR handoff had not been described. This intervention may be used in other institutions to design ICU to OR transitions of care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 March 2014

Jari Eloranta, Svetlozar Andreev and Pavel Osinsky

Did the expansion of democratic institutions play a role in determining central government spending behavior in the 19th and 20th centuries? The link between democracy and…

Abstract

Did the expansion of democratic institutions play a role in determining central government spending behavior in the 19th and 20th centuries? The link between democracy and increased central government spending is well established for the post-Second World War period, but has never been explored during the first “wave of democracy” and its subsequent reversal, that is 1870–1938. The main contribution of this paper is the compilation of a dataset covering 24 countries over this period to begin to address this question. Utilizing various descriptive techniques, including panel data regressions, we explore correlations between central government spending and the institutional characteristics of regimes. We find that the data are consistent with the hypothesis that democracies have a broader need for legitimization than autocracies as various measures of democracy are associated with higher central government spending. Our results indicate that the extension of franchise had a slight positive impact on central government spending levels, as did a few of the other democracy variables. We also find that early liberal democracies spent less and monarchies more than other regimes; debt increases spending; and participation in the Gold Standard reduced government spending substantially.

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Elliott N. Weiss and Marlene Friesen

This case details the history of Southwest Airlines from its inception in 1971 until 2004. The case provides details of Southwest's business model and reasons for its…

Abstract

This case details the history of Southwest Airlines from its inception in 1971 until 2004. The case provides details of Southwest's business model and reasons for its success. It ends with a description of the company's competitive pressures in 2004. The case can be used for a course in service operations or strategy.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 23 November 2005

Marlene Friesen, Elliott N. Weiss, Charlotte Thompson and Anwar Harahsheh

This case details the history of Southwest Airlines from its inception in 1971 until 2004. The case provides details of Southwest’s business model and reasons for its…

Abstract

This case details the history of Southwest Airlines from its inception in 1971 until 2004. The case provides details of Southwest’s business model and reasons for its success. It ends with a description of the company’s competitive pressures in 2004. The case can be used for a course in service operations or strategy.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

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Book part
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Michael Polgar

Sociology promotes and describes public health, helping to explain macro-social dynamics of mental health care through studies of organizations, networks, and systems of care.

Abstract

Purpose

Sociology promotes and describes public health, helping to explain macro-social dynamics of mental health care through studies of organizations, networks, and systems of care.

Methodology/approach

This chapter summarizes sociological research on mental health care organizations and systems, illustrating a macro-social perspective by examining the problem of transitions in care for young adults. Summary findings from a regional mental health services research project describe a system of care that includes 100 organizations. This system helps young adults with mental health needs.

Findings

The scope and management of care involves a focus on modes of treatment supported by research evidence and delivered effectively by people with cultural competencies. Care and continuity of care are delivered through coordinated systems of inter-organizational networks, linking organizations and providers. Active inter-organizational linkages are needed to support mental health for young adults during challenging and sometimes difficult transitions.

Originality/value

This research summarizes original and regional data on mental health care organizations within a regional system of care. Practical implications include support for the importance of coordination, transition planning, and cultural competence within and among organizations. Sociological and original research on organizations and systems should continue to elaborate the needs and values of mental health services for regional planning and public health.

Details

Education, Social Factors, and Health Beliefs in Health and Health Care Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-367-9

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2007

Oare’ Dozier-Henry

The dislocation between what people are and what they have to do produces an erosion in values, dignity, spirit, and will (Maslow, Stephens, and Heil (1998)). For…

Abstract

The dislocation between what people are and what they have to do produces an erosion in values, dignity, spirit, and will (Maslow, Stephens, and Heil (1998)). For educators in the new millennia, these are trying times. The lack of prestige and autonomy combined with exponentially increasing demands contributes to the high rate of attrition, stress, and burnout. To stay the course and remain vibrantly engaged in the profession will require an extraordinary degree of self-care. This chapter offers a lens for viewing systemic factors affecting the educational landscape and underscores the need for educators to employ individual and collective strategies to preserve health and well-being.

Details

Teaching Leaders to Lead Teachers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1461-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2017

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2002

Abstract

Details

The Comparative Study of Conscription in the Armed Forces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-836-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Alan D. Smith and William T. Rupp

One major purpose of performance appraisals is to determine individual merit, especially where pay for performance systems are employed. Based upon expectancy theory, high…

Abstract

One major purpose of performance appraisals is to determine individual merit, especially where pay for performance systems are employed. Based upon expectancy theory, high performance ratings should entail high merit increases while low performance ratings result in low merit increases. However, it appears that decoupling performance ratings and merit increases is a common practice, as evident from a survey that was administered to knowledge workers at multiple sites in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Human capital themes that appeared to be fair and/or equitable among the sampled knowledge workers, using a grounded theory approach, included the following collective concepts: marginal, actual performance, good reviews associated with good raises, nice raises, management's reviews are partly or mostly objective, employee intrinsic motivation, attitude, years of service, and appropriate education level. Negative aspects of the performance/reward systems were also explored. Associated training suggestions included constant attention by management that keeps the coupling of performance evaluations and motivational/incentive pay systems alive and well, as well as a system to track corporate goals that allow management to compare training, performance metrics, employee retention, and other data with company‐wide goals and employees’ expectations.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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