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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Jurbe Joseph Molwus, Bilge Erdogan and Stephen Ogunlana

Stakeholder management plays a significant role in successfully delivering construction projects. However, being able to carry out effective stakeholder management in…

Abstract

Purpose

Stakeholder management plays a significant role in successfully delivering construction projects. However, being able to carry out effective stakeholder management in construction is contingent upon understanding the interrelationships among critical success factors (CSFs) for stakeholder management in construction and how they are related to project success (PS). This would enable the persons responsible for stakeholder management to know the logical process for addressing the CSFs in order to get stakeholder management right. The understanding of this relationship has not been addressed. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interrelationships between the CSFs for stakeholder management and PS in construction.

Design/methodology/approach

From an extensive literature review, 23 CSFs for stakeholder management in construction were identified. A conceptual structural equation model (SEM) of the relationships between CSFs was developed (including measurement and structural models) using the groupings of the CSFs for stakeholder management in construction. A questionnaire survey was used to collect data from construction industry practitioners. The data so collected were analysed using SEM in analysis of moment structures (AMOS).

Findings

The SEM analysis of data collected resulted in the best fitting measurement model comprising 16 CSFs as indicators of four latent variables, namely, stakeholder characteristics and project characteristics (SCPC); stakeholder analysis (SA); stakeholder dynamics (SD); and stakeholder engagement/empowerment (SE). Furthermore, it was found that only SE has a direct positive impact on PS. The other three constructs SCPC, SA and understanding SD collectively impact on PS through the construct, SE.

Research limitations/implications

The research reported in this paper was carried out in the UK; hence, the findings may have portrayed the UK construction professionals’ opinion. However, the theoretical principles on which the research was based are general and similar research could be replicated in different countries whose construction procurement processes and industries are structured like those of the UK or otherwise.

Practical implications

The main contribution of this study to existing knowledge is an empirical evidence of the interrelationships among the CSFs for stakeholder management in construction through their latent variables which is portrayed in the best fitting structural model showing the relationships between the constructs of CSFs for stakeholder management and PS. This should serve as a guide to construction project management team or responsible professionals for undertaking stakeholder management in construction projects.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to theory by empirically identifying the interrelationships among the CSFs for stakeholder management linking to PS which will serve as a guide to construction professionals.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2019

Zehra Waheed and Stephen O. Ogunlana

This study aims to investigate projects as social exchange networks, focussing on identifying knowledge brokers within the project network where they are key holders and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate projects as social exchange networks, focussing on identifying knowledge brokers within the project network where they are key holders and disseminators of end-user needs. The purpose is to augment current theory through a practice lens so that building end-user requirements can be better incorporated in evolving project ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretive, an inductive case study is used to map knowledge brokers during a complex construction and co-location project. During the wider study, a variety of methods including archival data, interviews and questionnaires along with social network analysis (SNA) were used. The mixed methodology used has been pivotal in the triangulation of data from various sources. However, the output of SNA presented in this paper relies mostly on interviews and questionnaires administered to the project’s core network. Network relationships were mapped with knowledge of user requirements, being the key determinant of the binary relationships between actors.

Findings

The research found certain roles to be central knowledge brokers of knowledge related to end-user processes, including real estate and strategic planning, building operations and management, human and environmental factors, planning and project management and facility and service delivery. The knowledge of the above roles, albeit in a contextually situated case study, augments current understanding of which roles to tap on during project execution for better representation of end-user needs.

Practical implications

The research site is representative of a complex network of construction project stakeholders, including several categories of end-users and their representatives. The study demonstrates the use of the project-as-practice approach, whereby project theory is seen to emerge directly from practice. This has impact on practice as emergent theory about knowledge transfer and knowledge brokerage is essentially practice-led and hence more useful and relate-able to practitioners.

Originality/value

Research presented here is novel in terms of its approach towards understanding end-user needs such as need for privacy, control, attachment and interaction during construction projects. This is done through the identification of relevant knowledge brokers. The study uses SNA as an analytical tool to map knowledge transfers through the project’s network. End-user requirements are usually captured in the front-end of projects as specifications and deliverables, as new challenges emerge during execution, changes are required to the project’s direction and outcomes. It is therefore imperative that end-user needs are re-identified through knowledge brokers holding key knowledge. This allows project managers to prepare appropriate responses to changing project ecosystems.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Djoen San Santoso, Stephen O. Ogunlana and Takayuki Minato

Risk is inherent in every construction project, especially complex projects like high rise buildings. It is helpful to understand the significant risks in order to…

Abstract

Risk is inherent in every construction project, especially complex projects like high rise buildings. It is helpful to understand the significant risks in order to anticipate their possible negative effects on projects. This research identifies, ranks and categorizes high potential risks in high rise building projects in Jakarta. Questionnaire surveys and interviews were conducted on engineers from contracting firms in the city. The result shows that risks related to management and design are the most significant in high rise construction projects. It is also shown that client interference should be avoided or reduced in tandem with good communication and teamwork between contractors and consultants to minimize defects. Contractors also need to give attention to the maintenance of equipment in order to sustain high productivity levels.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Rathavoot Ruthankoon and Stephen Olu Ogunlana

Herzberg’s two‐factor theory of motivation is widely known in management circles. However, it has been criticized regarding its validity in different work settings…

Abstract

Herzberg’s two‐factor theory of motivation is widely known in management circles. However, it has been criticized regarding its validity in different work settings. Construction is an industry with unique characteristics which may have special effects on employee motivation. This study tests the two‐factor theory on Thai construction engineers and foremen following Herzberg’s interviewing procedure and compares the results to Herzberg’s. Responsibility, advancement, possibility of growth, and supervision contribute to job satisfaction, while working conditions, job security, safety on site, and relationships with other organizations contribute to job dissatisfaction. Recognition, work itself, company’s policy and administration, interpersonal relations, personal life, and status contribute to both satisfaction and dissatisfaction. Achievement contributes to satisfaction for engineers but contributes to both satisfaction and dissatisfaction for foremen. It is concluded that Herzberg’s theory is not entirely applicable in the Thai construction setting. Some factors should receive attention if construction employees are to be motivated effectively.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

STEPHEN O. OGUNLANA and WEI PIEN CHANG

The groundbreaking works of Maslow and Herzberg have been used by many researchers on construction worker motivation. These two classical theorists were used as the basis…

Abstract

The groundbreaking works of Maslow and Herzberg have been used by many researchers on construction worker motivation. These two classical theorists were used as the basis for a survey of needs, motivators and demotivators on high‐rise building construction sites in Bangkok, Thailand. The needs and felt motivators of construction workers in Bangkok are low on the Maslow hierarchy. The agreement between workers and supervisors regarding needs is strong. However, the agreement on motivators and demotivators is rather weak. This may lead to the use of inappropriate methods for motivating workers. A comparison of the results of the present survey with other studies showed that attempts to motivate workers should take cognizance of the cultural context in order to achieve good results.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2017

Prince Boateng, Zhen Chen and Stephen O. Ogunlana

Abstract

Details

Megaproject Risk Analysis and Simulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-830-1

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2017

Prince Boateng, Zhen Chen and Stephen O. Ogunlana

Abstract

Details

Megaproject Risk Analysis and Simulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-830-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

SDHABHON BHOKHA and STEPHEN O. OGUNLANA

The application of an artificial neural network (ANN) to forecast the construction duration of buildings at the predesign stage is described in this paper. A three‐layered…

Abstract

The application of an artificial neural network (ANN) to forecast the construction duration of buildings at the predesign stage is described in this paper. A three‐layered back‐propagation (BP) network consisting of 11 input nodes has been constructed. Ten binary input nodes represent basic information on building features (i.e. building function, structural system, foundation, height, exterior finishing, quality of interior decorating, and accessibility to the site), and one real‐value input represents functional area. The input nodes are fully connected to one output node through hidden nodes. The network was implemented on a Pentium‐150 based microcomputer using a neurocomputer program written in C+ +. The Generalized Delta Rule (GDR) was used as learning algorithm. One hundred and thirty‐six buildings built during the period 1987–95 in the Greater Bangkok area were used for training and testing the network. The determination of the optimum number of hidden nodes, learning rate, and momentum were based on trial‐and‐error. The best network was found to consist of six hidden nodes, with a learning rate of 0.6, and null momentum. It was trained for 44700 epochs within 943 s such that the mean squared error (judgement) of training and test samples were reduced to 1.17 × 10−7 and 3.10 × 10−6, respectively. The network can forecast construction du‐ration at the predesign stage with an average error of 13.6%.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2011

Braj Kishor Mahato and Stephen O. Ogunlana

The purpose of this paper is to present a model for a comprehensive and integrated approach to managing interface conflict from the early stages of a dam construction project.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a model for a comprehensive and integrated approach to managing interface conflict from the early stages of a dam construction project.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology is adopted. Following comprehensive literature review, qualitative data were gathered from case studies through interviews conducted on the Middle Marsyangdi Hydroelectric Project (MMHEP) dam project in Nepal. Causal loop diagrams on the typical evolution of key indicators of interface conflict were then developed and a simulate‐able model of interface conflict was derived using system dynamic modeling technique. The model was then simulated to derive viable policies for future management of dam construction projects in developing countries.

Findings

The study reveals that interface conflicts at the construction stage of projects are caused mainly by lack of effective Environmental Impact Assessment, public participation and mutual consultation, on timely basis and accurate information from the early stages of projects. The system dynamic model is able to replicate general behavior of evolution of interface conflict in a dam construction project. Furthermore, the study explored three viable policies to avoid and minimize interface conflict in the construction stage of a dam project. The policies were tested and demonstrated to be useful in improving the value of projects to stakeholders. It is demonstrated that a combination of policies is better than adopting a single policy to stakeholder management.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the utility of system dynamics as a modeling tool for understanding the dynamics of conflicts on dam construction projects. The model should be helpful to policy makers on large projects, especially those likely to be subject to social and environmental conflict. Policies derived from the model have the potential of being used to assess and take proactive measures to manage conflicts effectively and efficiently from early in a project's life.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Shamas‐ur‐Rehman Toor and Stephen O. Ogunlana

Large‐scale construction projects pose several challenges for successful completion. There seems to be no general agreement among researchers on what are the critical…

Abstract

Purpose

Large‐scale construction projects pose several challenges for successful completion. There seems to be no general agreement among researchers on what are the critical success factors (CSFs) on construction projects. Success factors vary across various projects, let alone countries. This paper attempts to elicit the perception of construction professionals on CSFs appertaining to large‐scale construction projects in Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire surveys and interviews were conducted with project managers, deputy project managers, and line managers to gather their perception on CSFs.

Findings

Results of 76 questionnaire surveys and 35 interviews revealed that factors related to project planning and control, project personnel, and involvement of client were perceived to be critical for the success of large‐scale construction projects in Thailand. Participants also showed their high concern for sufficient resources, adequate communication, mutual understanding of stakeholders on project goals, and award of bids to the “right” designers and contractors.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted on a single large‐scale construction project in Thailand, and hence, findings should be interpreted in context of Thai construction industry. The study also did not consider any specific procurement methods under which the project was being developed. Participants were asked about their general perception about CSFs on large‐scale construction projects.

Practical implications

Results from this study can be used as guidelines to ascertain CSFs on other large‐scale projects in Thailand. Project managers can also use this study to evaluate their current project and compare the perceived and real success factors for knowledge management exercises.

Originality/value

The paper captures the perception of construction professionals about CSFs in large‐scale projects in Thailand. It also presents a model for conceptual illustration of CSFs by differentiating the process domain from performance domain.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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