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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Stanley E. Fawcett and Stephen M. Rutner

The logistics and supply chain management discipline has evolved dramatically over the past generation. The rapid pace of change has challenged education providers – e.g.…

Abstract

Purpose

The logistics and supply chain management discipline has evolved dramatically over the past generation. The rapid pace of change has challenged education providers – e.g., universities, professional associations, and publications – to remain relevant to various stakeholders. Relying on an open systems design perspective, the purpose of this paper is to assess how well organizations use constrained resources (personnel, dollars, time, etc.) to meet customers’ educational needs.

Design/methodology/approach

To examine how well educational providers are meeting stakeholder goals, universities, associations, and publications are examined across time by multiple surveys to determine if they are keeping pace in the changing business world.

Findings

The paper identifies two gaps. First, stakeholders report a growing gap between the offerings of existing education providers and their educational needs. Second, the gap between academic and practitioner perceptions is growing. Importantly, some organizations and universities are doing a better job of responding to changing educational requirements. Finally, a shift to SCM is further complicating the educational process.

Originality/value

This study makes two primary contributions. First, it identifies important changes in the logistics and supply chain education market. Second, it provides updated rankings of the perceptions of academics and practitioners regarding three education providers: professional organizations, universities, and publications. This insight enables logistics and supply chain thought leaders to evaluate how they can enhance education resources and thus remain relevant in a rapidly changing and increasingly tumultuous marketplace.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Stephen M. Rutner and C. John Langley

Most logistics professionals and academics agree that logistics is an essential function within business. Furthermore, there has been a trend over the last few years to…

Abstract

Most logistics professionals and academics agree that logistics is an essential function within business. Furthermore, there has been a trend over the last few years to consider logistics as a process that creates value. While the terms value and value‐added have experienced popular usage, they are neither clearly defined nor accurately measured. A primary goal of this article is to clarify these definitions, in the context of how value is created by logistics. Based on empirical research, definitions of value and value‐added are suggested that are founded upon and related to the perspectives of practicing managers. Following a brief literature review, details are provided about the objectives and methodology of the research that was conducted. Last, managerial implications and the key messages for both logistics managers and researchers are presented.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Brian J. Gibson, Stephen M. Rutner and Scott B. Keller

Over the past decade, there have been a number of studies that examined either shipper or carrier selection and evaluation factors. However, there has been little…

Abstract

Over the past decade, there have been a number of studies that examined either shipper or carrier selection and evaluation factors. However, there has been little comparison between how these two groups perceive these factors with regard to their partners. This study examines the similarities and differences with the rankings of factors between shipper and carrier groups. Furthermore, the results highlight the various levels of satisfaction between the two groups.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

John T. Mentzer, Stephen M. Rutner and Ken Matsuno

In the behavioural science areas of psychology and consumer behaviour, the means‐end value hierarchy model has often been applied to understand individuals’ values…

Abstract

In the behavioural science areas of psychology and consumer behaviour, the means‐end value hierarchy model has often been applied to understand individuals’ values structures ‐ in particular, the value of a company’s product/ service offering to its customers. Applying the means‐end value hierarchy model in a logistics context, logistics customer value can be thought of as a higher‐order evaluative standard for customers’ satisfaction and service quality evaluation processes. As such, it is important for a firm to know what its customers value when seeking to build a competitive advantage. Attempts to advance our understanding of logistics customer value through the application of the means‐end value hierarchy model to logistics. More specifically, investigates the customer value of logistics service in a business‐to‐business setting using the means‐end value hierarchy model. Uses focus group interview data for developing the customer value hierarchy.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Stephen M. Rutner, Maria Aviles and Scott Cox

This paper aims to look at the relative position of thought leadership between the areas of military and civilian logisticians.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to look at the relative position of thought leadership between the areas of military and civilian logisticians.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a theoretical framework in an exploratory study using the literature to evaluate the constraints on the military side of logistics thought.

Findings

The discussion identifies challenges that may preclude military logistics thought from becoming the leaders for the foreseeable future.

Originality/value

The paper provides an examination of the changing role between military and civilian logistics that has not been carefully examined since just after the Gulf War in 1991.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Amit Sinha, William P. Millhiser and Yuanjie He

The field of supply chain management (SCM) evolves dramatically due to factors of globalization, innovation, sustainability, and technology. These changes raise challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

The field of supply chain management (SCM) evolves dramatically due to factors of globalization, innovation, sustainability, and technology. These changes raise challenges not only to higher education institutions, but also to students, employing organizations, and third parties like SCM-related professional bodies. To understand the challenge, the purpose of this paper is to examine the gap between demand and supply of SCM-related knowledge areas, answer-related design questions, and make recommendations to close the gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

To compare the demand and supply of SCM-related knowledge areas, demand data is collected from a professional career website and supply data is gathered from operations management (OM) and SCM course syllabi from AACSB-accredited business schools in the USA. Cluster analysis identifies how supply and demand are matched on the data collected.

Findings

First, gaps exist between SCM talent requirements from industry and the knowledge/skill training by US business schools. This paper identifies matching, under-supplying, and over-supplying knowledge areas. Under-supply in emerging areas such as SCM information technology and certain logistics management topics are found. Some traditional OM topics are over-supplied due to out-of-date industry applications and should be revised to reflect the field’s transition from an OM to SCM view. Last, this paper makes recommendations to different stakeholders in this matching supply with demand process.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature in two ways. First, it provides an up-to-date understanding on demand and supply of SCM talent in USA. Second, it provides insights and recommendations not only to educators on curriculum design, but also to potential candidates interested in SCM careers, to companies’ job recruiters, and to professional organizations (such as APICS and Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals) to reduce the gaps between demand and supply.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Nisa Bakkalbasi, Damon Jaggars and Barbara Rockenbach

The purpose of this paper is to describe an assessment design for the Developing Librarian training program. The Developing Librarian training program created by and for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an assessment design for the Developing Librarian training program. The Developing Librarian training program created by and for librarians and professional staff in the Humanities and History division is a two-year training program to acquire new skills and methodologies to support the digital humanities. The program is based on the assumption that learning must happen in context; therefore the training is project based with all participants engaged in building a digital humanities research site as a team. This approach enables participants to learn about new tools in a sustained manner that parallels the way humanities researchers are likely to use them.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to measure the success of achieving this goal, program designers defined three objectives: learn tools and methods that support the emerging research needs and trends in the humanities; create a more interesting and engaging work environment for librarians and professional staff; and engage effectively with the humanities research community across the University. Three methods/instruments were: Explicit Self-Reflections to assess what participants learned in each training unit; the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale to measure how participants feel about their work before and after the training program; and the Skill Set, Knowledge and Attitude Assessment to be administered at completion to measure the effectiveness of the training program as a whole.

Findings

At the time of writing, the Developing Librarian Project is mid-way to completion, and implementation of the assessment plan is ongoing. Based on these self-reports, there is evidence that the training program has been effective, and participants have been successful in meeting most of the learning objectives identified in the units completed. While self-assessment of knowledge and skills may have its limitations, this technique is proving adequate and efficient for achieving the program’s goals. This method encourages experimentation and establishes failure as an important aspect of the learning process.

Research limitations/implications

An assessment approach such as this does not measure the impact of training and development on digital humanities research, but initiates a valuable process, highlighting skills gaps at the individual, and organizational levels. These data are important for identifying and implementing appropriate training opportunities for librarians supporting emergent research activities and for understanding what skills and professional preparation are needed for new staff recruited into the organization.

Originality/value

A successful training program should be benchmarked, evaluated in a substantive and systematic way, and improved continuously. A formal assessment plan, directly tied to clearly articulated objectives, helps assure that such a program is effectively evaluated, iteratively developed, and successfully implemented. The Developing Librarian Project provides a useful model of how an academic library can leverage assessment and evaluation processes to identify skills gaps and training needs and generate actionable data for improving staff learning.

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Suman Niranjan, Stephen R. Spulick and Katrina Savitskie

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an exploratory study that will assist supply chain firms in the development of partner satisfaction, flexibility, and supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an exploratory study that will assist supply chain firms in the development of partner satisfaction, flexibility, and supply chain performance. The authors examine how the interaction of information exchange, partner interaction, knowledge sharing and flexibility as mediated through partner satisfaction effectuates firm performance. The goal of this research is to answer the supply chain managers’ need to better understand where to invest their time and effort to get improved firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested with panel data from 105 experienced, US-based supply chain managers. Structural equation modeling using partial least squares approach was utilized to conduct the analysis.

Findings

The results provide crucial evidence that simple information exchange among supply chain partners does not result in improvements in firm performance or partner satisfaction, but, when mediated through the flexibility construct, it does. Further, the use of integration tools has a moderating effect on the relationship between flexibility and firm performance. The results suggest that working closely with supply chain partners helps ensure improved relationship satisfaction, and can reduce issues that can impact firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical research presented requires additional validation though larger sample data from supply chain managers.

Practical implications

This study stresses on the importance of managers using information exchange, partner interaction, and knowledge sharing as a means of improving their firm’s indirect influence on firm performance through flexibility and integration tools.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies in the supply chain literature that integrates flexibility as a mediator variable. Additionally, this study introduces the new construct of integration tools to the supply chain literature.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2010

Atefeh Yazdanparast, Ila Manuj and Stephen M. Swartz

The purpose of this study is to explore logistics service value through the theoretical lens of service‐dominant (S‐D) logic with a focus on the creation of logistics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore logistics service value through the theoretical lens of service‐dominant (S‐D) logic with a focus on the creation of logistics value jointly by the provider and the customer.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐disciplinary literature review including supply chain management, logistics, marketing, and strategy is conducted to integrate existing knowledge on value of service and antecedents and consequences of value creation in a process framework for co‐creation of value in a logistics context. This framework is grounded in the S‐D logic perspective and supported by transaction cost analysis (TCA), resource‐based view (RBV) and knowledge‐based view (KBV) of the firm.

Findings

The process of co‐creation of value in a logistics context has three phases: learning, innovation and execution, and outcomes. These phases and their key elements are integrated into a comprehensive framework of co‐creation of logistics service value. A total of 12 propositions are offered to describe the process for achieving competitive advantage through co‐creation of logistics service value.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed framework adds to the current knowledge on logistics service value by exploring the concept from the S‐D logic perspective and suggests guidelines for managers on developing a process for co‐creation of logistics service value that leads to competitive advantage and enhanced customer satisfaction. Follow‐on qualitative research such as grounded theory is needed to emerge a theory grounded in empirical data that explicates how the co‐creation of value can occur.

Originality/value

This study is novel in that it applies the S‐D logic perspective in a logistics context. This research leverages existing knowledge through a deeper understanding of the concept of logistics service value and use of well‐accepted theoretical perspectives such as TCA, RBV, and KBV.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Stephen Strombeck and Shih-Tung Shu

– The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the critical role that context plays in measuring service quality.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the critical role that context plays in measuring service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

This study replicated an experiment methodology to show that customers perceive an airline service drama as a sequence of scenes. A series of focus groups were then conducted to identify the context-specific set of service quality expectations that customers hold for each of these scenes. Finally, Formal Concept Analysis (FCA), a mathematical modeling technique, was applied to these findings to graphically illustrate how customer expectations for airline service quality vary by service scene.

Findings

Results from this study indicate that static measures of service quality are apparently inadequate in explaining customer expectations during more enduring service encounters. The FCA hierarchical model developed in this study revealed profound differences in customer service expectations across the six airline service scenes. These results suggest that more advanced methods for measuring service quality are necessary for service encounters that are longer in duration.

Research limitations/implications

This research brings into question a broad spectrum of research which fails to recognize that customers use different reference points in time to evaluate service quality.

Practical implications

Researchers and practitioners need accurate and reliable measures of service quality but the findings suggests that measurement specificity and diagnostic capability should not be sacrificed in the pursuit of more robust instruments.

Originality/value

This is the first study to empirically demonstrate that customers perceive the airline service encounter as a sequence of scenes. It is also the first study to mathematically model service quality dimensions using FCA.

Details

Managing Service Quality, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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