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Article

Stephen Linstead, Joanna Brewis and Alison Linstead

To provide a critical review of existing contributions to gender and change management and in doing so highlight how organizational change needs to be read more readily…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a critical review of existing contributions to gender and change management and in doing so highlight how organizational change needs to be read more readily from a gendered perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper argues that gender has received little attention regarding the change management side of managerial practice and reviews recent contributions to gender and change to demonstrate this. The paper then questions how men and women both cope with and drive change and whether the identified differences are more than superficial. The concept of gender is then read into management theory in order to understand how gender affects the way managers think and act, and the gendering of management is discussed. The paper concludes by outlining future research areas – change agents, entrepreneurs, female innovators, psychoanalytic treatments of change and gender experiences.

Findings

The paper finds that traditional and dominant conceptions of masculine and feminine values that rely on static conceptions of gender to argue that more attention to be paid to the dynamic and the genderful approaches.

Research limitations/implications

The paper concludes by outlining future research areas – change agents, entrepreneurs, female innovators, psychoanalytic treatments of change and gender experiences.

Practical implications

Draws much needed attention to the neglect of gender in change theory and practice and suggests some ways forward.

Originality/value

Offers a unique introduction to an important but complex literature that needs to be integrated into change management practice.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Abstract

Purpose

To introduce the special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A brief description of the Gender and Management track at the European Academy of Management Conference and an outline of the papers in the issue.

Findings

The track examined various issues and the papers chosen from the track for the special issue are closest to the central concerns of the journal.

Originality/value

Provides a summary of the perspectives considered.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

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Article

Stephen Linstead

Between 1985 and 1988 we were involved in research and consultancy for the Working Men's Club and Institute Union in the United Kingdom. This organisation of voluntary…

Abstract

Between 1985 and 1988 we were involved in research and consultancy for the Working Men's Club and Institute Union in the United Kingdom. This organisation of voluntary clubs is unique in Europe and has been identified as potentially the largest single consumer group in the European Community. It is active in the political sphere at both Westminster (where it organises the largest All‐Party Parliamentary Committee with 181 sitting members of both houses) and at Strasbourg (a smaller group of active M.E.P.s) and it has set up mechanisms for negotiation for national accounting with the major brewers, although the organisation is itself the major shareholder in two smaller clubs' breweries. Nevertheless, the club union is in a worrying decline, and one of the contributory factors to this has been its commercially naive attitude to the brewery companies with whom its members do business. In addition, the organisation is a democratic affiliation, with what has been argued as being the most democratic but also the most cumbersome and frustrating structure of any British working class institution. In this paper we attempt to describe some of the tensions between democratic altruism and commercial necessity which bedevil the continuing existence of the organisation, and of its constituent clubs, in the context of current industry strategy. Part of this research was sponsored by the UK Economic and Social Research Council grant No. F09 0067, 1986; a further project by the Working Men's Club and Institute Union itself.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 12 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article

Stephen Linstead and Andrew Chan

Examines the structure of command in organizations and the use of“fear” to bring people into line during periods of rapid change. Detailsproblems experienced by…

Abstract

Examines the structure of command in organizations and the use of “fear” to bring people into line during periods of rapid change. Details problems experienced by organizations who, though good at coping with crises, do not know what to do to maintain momentum without engineering the next crisis. Goes on to consider the implications of structure to organizational relationships and uses the concept of the “sting” to illustrate this – whereby an individual acts on a command, but the sting is an objection to such an obeyed command or act of deference, which can impede later organizational relationships between individuals and groups. A short case study of Hong Kong Telecom is used to highlight reactions to change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article

Stephen Linstead

The concept of culture in an organizational context is by no means an invention of the 1980's, but there can be little disputing that it has enjoyed a spectacular…

Abstract

The concept of culture in an organizational context is by no means an invention of the 1980's, but there can be little disputing that it has enjoyed a spectacular proliferation during this period. In what follows I will briefly outline the major theoretical positions which have arisen, the problems resulting from these approaches, and some new avenues in response to these problems which are being pursued at Lancaster.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 14 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to…

Abstract

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to uncover specific articles devoted to certain topics. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume III, in addition to the annotated list of articles as the two previous volumes, contains further features to help the reader. Each entry within has been indexed according to the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus and thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid information retrieval. Each article has its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. The first Volume of the Bibliography covered seven journals published by MCB University Press. This Volume now indexes 25 journals, indicating the greater depth, coverage and expansion of the subject areas concerned.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Stephen Linstead

The demand for management training and development is currentlyshaped by a requirement for flexibility in delivery, minimising timespent away from the workplace, and an…

Abstract

The demand for management training and development is currently shaped by a requirement for flexibility in delivery, minimising time spent away from the workplace, and an associated demand for content relevant to the workplace activity. Distance learning is an effective response, but it encounters problems in terms of the learner′s vulnerability, learning styles, structural dysfunctions, the development of higher‐order or “meta”‐competences, and the seductiveness of methods of introducing “reality” into events. An attempt to address these problems is made in combining distance learning, discovery learning, and a computer‐based simulation and some of the key issues and problems encountered are identified.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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