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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Ian Laird, Kirsten Olsen, Leigh‐Ann Harris, Stephen Legg and Melissa J. Perry

The aim of this paper is to present the literature which identifies the characteristics of small enterprises and outlines the opportunities to utilise them in working with…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present the literature which identifies the characteristics of small enterprises and outlines the opportunities to utilise them in working with small businesses to prevent and reduce exposures to hazardous substances.

Design/methodology/approach

A search of a variety of data sources, including Medline, PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar, was conducted which combined the keyword search terms “small business”, “small enterprise”, “management”, “health and safety management”, “hazardous substances”, “hazardous chemicals”, “management of hazardous substances”. High quality studies were selected and combined with studies known to the authors.

Findings

A strong body of evidence exists which shows that the management of OSH in small enterprises has been extensively reviewed and the most recurring theme is the identification of problems and challenges. A growing body of literature also confirms that models for chemical risk management and social responsibility issues can play a key role in managing hazardous chemical exposures in small enterprises. Furthermore, studies have shown that there are certain characteristics of small business that potentially provide positive opportunities for the implementation of preventive interventions.

Originality/value

The paper identifies these characteristics and features and suggests these can be effectively utilised in the design and development of interventions to prevent and reduce exposures to hazardous substances in small enterprises. Few interventions, however, have been developed utilising these positive characteristics.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2011

Craig Brown and Stephen Legg

The International Ergonomics Association (IEA)'s definition of HF/E includes the following:Ergonomics (or human factors) is the scientific discipline concerned with the…

Abstract

The International Ergonomics Association (IEA)'s definition of HF/E includes the following:Ergonomics (or human factors) is the scientific discipline concerned with the understanding of interactions among humans and other elements of a system, and the profession that applies theory, principles, data and methods to design in order to optimize human well-being and overall system performance … Organizational ergonomics is concerned with the optimization of sociotechnical systems, including their organizational structures, policies, and processes. (IEA Council, 2000)

Details

Business and Sustainability: Concepts, Strategies and Changes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-439-9

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Lynn M. Jeffrey, Sophie Hide and Stephen Legg

This paper aims to report on the second half of a two‐part study that identified relevant content for safety audit training in small businesses. The specific aim of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the second half of a two‐part study that identified relevant content for safety audit training in small businesses. The specific aim of the paper is to determine the preferred learning styles and approaches of managers in these businesses in order to identify some principles which could be used to tailor training to meet their particular learning needs.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants in the study came from three relatively high‐risk industries – road transport, construction, and the motor trade – producing a sample size of 102. A self‐report questionnaire was distributed via trade magazines.

Findings

Very few differences were found between the three industries. Most differences were between road transport and the other two industries. Managers in the road transport industry have a lower preference for learning by listening and are less likely to be sequential learners than managers in the motor trade industry.

Practical implications

Small business managers are systematic, hard‐working, pragmatic and prefer less formal modes of learning. These characteristics have implications for the structure and context of training programmes and the nature of the training materials.

Originality/value

The four learning profiles that emerged from the analysis in the paper provide a clear picture of the small business managers in the three industries studied.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Tauno Kekale and Sara Cervai

Abstract

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2011

Abstract

Details

Business and Sustainability: Concepts, Strategies and Changes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-439-9

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2011

Gabriel Eweje and Martin Perry

This book aims to assist readers in navigating the conceptual maze surrounding discussions of business and sustainability by offering critical reflection on the state of…

Abstract

This book aims to assist readers in navigating the conceptual maze surrounding discussions of business and sustainability by offering critical reflection on the state of business action for environmental sustainability and providing evidence about what is actually taking place in real localities and businesses. The chapters in this volume are relevant in sustainability research, focusing on issues that are critical, topical and needed at this stage of the discussion. This volume makes three main contributions. First, it offers a critical review of business engagement with sustainability from four perspectives: sustainability as a political project; sustainability as a response to environmental crisis, sustainability as business opportunity and sustainability as stakeholder management. The chapters for example, link business case for sustainability to the larger debate about ‘ecological modernisation’: this perspective believes that the way out of the ecological crisis is to go further into the process of industrialisation. A complication to this claim is that business must be given the right market signals to identify and profit from their environment impacts, in other words that ‘ecology must be economised’. As the chapters will show, the notion of a business case is misleading if it is intended to imply some freely arrived at evaluation without reference to the context in which decisions are made.

Details

Business and Sustainability: Concepts, Strategies and Changes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-439-9

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Book part
Publication date: 20 December 2017

Søren Ivarsson and Søren Rud

The main theme of this special volume is the colonial state and its governmental practices. This chapter introduces and contextualizes the contributions by providing a…

Abstract

The main theme of this special volume is the colonial state and its governmental practices. This chapter introduces and contextualizes the contributions by providing a brief induction to recent developments within the study of the colonial state. It then presents the contributions under three perspectives which represent separate yet interrelated themes relevant for the understanding of the colonial state: practices, violence, and agency. Hereby, we also accentuate the value of a non-state-centric approach to the analysis of the colonial state.

Details

Rethinking the Colonial State
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-655-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1955

ARTHUR ELTON

The film approach to history in this paper I want to consider the film as source material for history in the sense that palimpsest and parchment, hieroglyph and rune…

Abstract

The film approach to history in this paper I want to consider the film as source material for history in the sense that palimpsest and parchment, hieroglyph and rune, clay tablet and manorial roll are source materials—fragments, sometimes fragments of fragments, often defaced by time, and applied to purposes of historical reconstruction rarely contemplated by the original authors. For the most part I shall not be particularly concerned with the various philosophies of history—whether it is the job of the historian to lay material dispassionately before the student so that he can make up his own mind about what happened in the past, or to digest source material in order to arrive at the truth—that is, what the historian may hope is the whole incontrovertible real truth, or to digest source material, as Macaulay and Carlyle digested it, in order to justify something in contemporary life or thought. All that need be said here for the moment is that films can be used, as other historical source material can be used, for various and different historical purposes.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1955

K.L.C. Legg

SUCCESSFUL welding of commercially pure titanium and its alloys has, so far, been difficult to achieve, and this is largely due to the affinity this metal has for…

Abstract

SUCCESSFUL welding of commercially pure titanium and its alloys has, so far, been difficult to achieve, and this is largely due to the affinity this metal has for embrittling constituents, e.g. hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon, at high temperatures.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 27 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Daniel Murphy and Dianne McGrath

The purpose of this paper is to expand our understanding of the motivations for corporate environmental, social and governance (ESG) reporting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand our understanding of the motivations for corporate environmental, social and governance (ESG) reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a conceptual exploration of the motivation for corporations to provide ESG reports and proposes deterrence theory and avoidance as a complementary explanatory motivation for such reports.

Findings

Within this paper it is argued that part of the motivation for some corporations to increase ESG disclosures is to avoid, or mitigate, the risk of class actions and the associated financial penalties. This paper proposes that in Australia the deterrence impact, and ancillary avoidance behaviour, of civil litigation class action provides a further motivation for improving both corporate ESG disclosure and sustainability performance.

Originality/value

This paper extends the social and environmental accounting (SEA) reporting literature by proposing deterrence theory and avoidance as a corporate motivation for environmental, social and governance (ESG) reporting. Deterrence is proposed as a different, yet complementary, motivation to the oft‐cited variations of stakeholder and legitimacy theory which are dominant in the SEA reporting motivation literature.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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