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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

John W. Kensinger and Stephen L. Poe

This paper explores the advantages (for large investors) of directly owning productive assets, compared with indirect ownership through stock in corporations. Significant…

Abstract

This paper explores the advantages (for large investors) of directly owning productive assets, compared with indirect ownership through stock in corporations. Significant factors are agency costs and recent changes in the tax and regulatory environment. Recent corporate scandals have led to legislative and regulatory responses that significantly increase the monitoring costs and other burdens of becoming or remaining a public corporation. As a result, there has been a substantial increase in going-private transactions, particularly among smaller public companies. However, the pressures to go private are not entirely new. We trace the legal concept that the corporation is an entity separate and apart from its owners, showing how the legal status of corporations hinders resolution of conflicts among the parties to the enterprise. Thus, there have long been fundamental flaws inherent in the corporation as the form of organization for certain activities. Direct ownership of major assets by investors prevents future expropriation of resources, and is preferable to corporate ownership whenever other alternatives for indemnification or liability limitation are available (such as insurance, limited partnerships, limited liability companies, etc.). Finally, the renewal of direct ownership is not a radical shift, but a return to long-established tradition in the organization of business activities.

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Research in Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-277-1

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Abstract

Details

Research in Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-277-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Abstract

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Research in Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-277-1

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Stephen Brown

Purpose: At a conference inspired by Hans Christian Andersen, this chapter makes the case for his shadowy American contemporary, Edgar Allan Poe.Methodology: Employing a

Abstract

Purpose: At a conference inspired by Hans Christian Andersen, this chapter makes the case for his shadowy American contemporary, Edgar Allan Poe.

Methodology: Employing a comparative literary analysis, it contends that consumer culture theory (CCT) can learn more from Poe’s quothful raven than Andersen’s ugly duckling.

Findings: Principally that Poe’s Ps of Perversity, Pugnacity, and Poetry are particularly pertinent to an adolescent, self-harm-prone subdiscipline that’s struggling to find itself and make its way in the world.

Originality: Poe and Andersen’s names rarely appear in the same sentence. They do now.

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Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-285-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Stuart Hannabuss

The management of children′s literature is a search for value andsuitability. Effective policies in library and educational work arebased firmly on knowledge of materials…

Abstract

The management of children′s literature is a search for value and suitability. Effective policies in library and educational work are based firmly on knowledge of materials, and on the bibliographical and critical frame within which the materials appear and might best be selected. Boundaries, like those between quality and popular books, and between children′s and adult materials, present important challenges for selection, and implicit in this process are professional acumen and judgement. Yet also there are attitudes and systems of values, which can powerfully influence selection on grounds of morality and good taste. To guard against undue subjectivity, the knowledge frame should acknowledge the relevance of social and experiential context for all reading materials, how readers think as well as how they read, and what explicit and implicit agendas the authors have. The good professional takes all these factors on board.

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Library Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Stephen J. Bradley

Organisations cannot effectively implement advanced workplace strategies and investment projects without clearly communicated vision, prioritised objectives and…

Abstract

Organisations cannot effectively implement advanced workplace strategies and investment projects without clearly communicated vision, prioritised objectives and appropriate performance metrics. With any business strategy and investment project, the objectives and metrics selected will combine both quantitative and qualitative elements and aim to achieve both internal and external impact. This multidimensionality of objectives indicates the use of a balanced scorecard system of measurement. This paper argues that a coherent evaluation and feedback system should be an integral part of any workplace change programme, and that time and expenditure should be budgeted for learning from prototyping or piloting, review, adaptation and communication of feedback. Without such a learning loop, real estate professionals will fail to convince business leaders of how changes in corporate workplaces contribute to business success.

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Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1936

MID‐OCTOBER sees the activities of the library world in full swing. Meetings, committee discussions, schools at work, students busy with December and May examinations in…

Abstract

MID‐OCTOBER sees the activities of the library world in full swing. Meetings, committee discussions, schools at work, students busy with December and May examinations in view, and a host of occupations for the library worker. This year—for in a sense the library year begins in October—will be a busy one. For the Library Association Council there will be the onerous business of preparing a report on State Control; for libraries there will be the effort to retain readers in a land of increasing employment and reduced leisure; and for the students, as we have remarked in earlier issues, preparations for the new syllabus of examinations which becomes operative in 1938. It is a good month, too, to consider some phases of library work with children, “which,” to quote the L.A. Resolutions of 1917, “ought to be the basis of all other library work.”

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New Library World, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Zhonghua Gou and Stephen Siu‐Yu Lau

A green building should provide occupants with a comfortable and energy‐efficient environment. The aim of this paper is, following a post‐occupancy study, to find out…

Abstract

Purpose

A green building should provide occupants with a comfortable and energy‐efficient environment. The aim of this paper is, following a post‐occupancy study, to find out whether the green intent is being delivered.

Design/methodology/approach

A post‐occupancy study was conducted in a high standard office building certified by China's Green Building Label. The study included an occupant survey and a physical measurement.

Findings

The building generally achieved its intended thermal environment of 25°C during cooling seasons and satisfied more than 80 per cent of occupants. Sources of discomfort, including low temperatures in both the summer and winter were identified. Objective measurements showed that the building's indoor temperature varied among floors in both the summer and winter. The variation was mainly a result of occupancy conditions. Variations in the thermal environment also revealed that the building's users have good energy conservation habits.

Research limitations/implications

Post‐occupancy evaluations should be included in the green building certification process to demonstrate a building's sustainability after construction and operation. Facilities management should take the responsibility to periodically examine the green intent being delivered.

Originality/value

The paper provides empirical data to expand the international post‐occupancy evaluation on green buildings. The building under study as a green design showcase represents current green building development in China.

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Facilities, vol. 31 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Elizabeth Futas

For readers' advisory librarians, genre literature can prove to be difficult collection management areas. The literature itself has rarely been defined in anything but the…

Abstract

For readers' advisory librarians, genre literature can prove to be difficult collection management areas. The literature itself has rarely been defined in anything but the negative (“not great literature,” “not of lasting quality”) and yet it makes up a good deal of the attraction for many patrons to the public library, and gives great circulation support to their collections. Percentage‐wise, it gets the least attention for the most benefits. Many budgets are based on circulation figures, and much of the commendable relationship with the public is based on readers who devour genre literature. Why is it that genre readers are given such short shrift for their loyalty and devotion? Some of the problem lies in the traditional view of genre literature and the rest in the new view of collection development.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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