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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Moses Muhwezi and Venancio Tauringana

The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of a study carried out to determine the use of Management Accounting Practices (MAPR) in Ugandan secondary schools…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of a study carried out to determine the use of Management Accounting Practices (MAPR) in Ugandan secondary schools. The study also sought to determine whether MAPR and governing boards (board size, gender diversity and frequency of board meetings) influence the perceived competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is cross-sectional and correlational. Data were collected through a questionnaire survey of 200 secondary schools. The data were analysed through ordinary least squares regression using Statistical Package for Social Scientists.

Findings

There are wide variations in MAP in terms of the extent to which the schools employ management accounting techniques. Also, MAP and governing boards have a predictive force on the schools’ competitive advantage. However, governing board’s size has no effect on competitive advantage. In terms of the control variables, the results suggest that while government school ownership has a positive effect on competitive advantage, the school’s size has no effect. There are intertwining relationships of frequency of board meetings, board size and school size.

Research limitations/implications

The present study was limited to the secondary schools in Uganda which limits generalisability. Still, the results offer important implications for secondary schools’ governing boards, owners and for similar African governments who are a major stakeholder in the secondary school education system. The exact mechanism by which intertwining relationships of frequency of board meetings, board size and school size impact competitive advantage is not been explored in this paper. Future researchers may direct research effort in this endeavour.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to investigate use of MAPR in secondary schools and to provide evidence of their efficacy.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Juma Bananuka, Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Irene Nalukenge and Twaha Kaawaase

The purpose of this study is to investigate the contribution of internal audit function and audit committee effectiveness on accountability in statutory corporations (SCs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the contribution of internal audit function and audit committee effectiveness on accountability in statutory corporations (SCs).

Design/methodology/approach

This study is cross sectional and correlational. Data have been collected through a questionnaire survey of 52 SCs in Uganda through their Chief Internal Auditors and Chief Finance Officers. Data have been analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences.

Findings

The internal audit function significantly contributes to accountability of SCs in Uganda and audit committee effectiveness is not where effective internal audit is present in such organisations. However, audit committee effectiveness significantly contributes to accountability when an internal audit function is not present.

Research limitations/implications

The use of hierarchical regression is prone to problems associated with sampling error. However, the likelihood of these problems is mitigated by the interface with data.

Originality/value

Whereas hitherto both internal audit function and audit committee effectiveness had been viewed as explanations of accountability, this study only confirms the internal audit function as a significant predictor of SCs’ accountability relative to audit committee effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Bruno Muramuzi and Kassim Alinda

The increasing environmental challenges require efforts to expand the scope of accounting to better evaluate organizations’ behaviour/practices. This paper aims to report…

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing environmental challenges require efforts to expand the scope of accounting to better evaluate organizations’ behaviour/practices. This paper aims to report the results of studying the link between environmental management accounting (EMA), board role performance (BRP), company characteristics and environmental performance disclosure (EPD) of Ugandan manufacturing firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was correlational and cross-sectional. The results are obtained through content analysis of company reports, websites and a questionnaire survey of 102 large and medium manufacturing firms in four districts of Uganda.

Findings

Results indicate that EMA causes significant variances in EPD in manufacturing firms. Also, BRP and firm size explain variances in EPD through EMA.

Research limitations/implications

The research does not control for industry type. Still, the results offer hope on how the reliability of environmental performance information that companies voluntarily provide outside financial statements, can be improved.

Originality/value

Results potentially extend available literature by providing a mechanism through which the environmental performance information is obtained for onward disclosure.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Gorettie Kyeyune Nakyeyune and Moses Muhwezi

Despite the advancement of the assumptions of agency and institutional theories whereby monitoring structures and controls form the basis of management, inadequate public…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the advancement of the assumptions of agency and institutional theories whereby monitoring structures and controls form the basis of management, inadequate public finance regulatory compliance among public entities has continued to be a challenge. The purpose of this paper is to examine how to break out of the apparent cycle of failures to comply with public finance regulations.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study that integrates two approaches (cooperative and coercive models) drawing from the view that in central government agencies, there may be stewards and also agents motivated by self-interest, suggesting that the most promising framework is that which renders the traditional ways of achieving regulatory compliance to be supplemented with the stewardship model. Thus, the authors focus on four variables: management mechanisms, ethical climate, deterrence measures and public finance regulatory compliance all drawn from agency, institutional and stewardship theories. The authors collect data from 67 central government agencies in Uganda using a structured questionnaire.

Findings

The authors find that management mechanisms dimensions of leadership support and organisational commitment significantly associate with public finance regulatory compliance and so too are deterrence measures particularly oversight organs, penalties and procedural justices.

Research limitations/implications

Public finance regulatory compliance can be improved through management mechanisms and deterrence measures.

Originality/value

The study generates empirical evidence on the applicability of stewardship theory in the management of public entities for regulatory compliance

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Irene Nalukenge, Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga and Joseph Mpeera Ntayi

The purpose of this paper is to establish the relationship between corporate governance, ethical culture, Internal Controls over Financial Reporting (ICFR) and compliance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the relationship between corporate governance, ethical culture, Internal Controls over Financial Reporting (ICFR) and compliance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) by microfinance institutions (MFIs).

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross-sectional survey based on a sample of 85 MFIs in Uganda. Hypotheses were tested using partial least squares (PLS) analysis technique. An unweighed IFRS compliance index to capture the level of compliance with IFRS was constructed. Yet to capture corporate governance, ethical culture and ICFR variables, the perceptions of top management of MFIs have been taken into consideration.

Findings

Corporate governance, ethical culture and ICFR, each makes a significant contribution to compliance with IFRS. Also both corporate governance and ethical culture are significantly associated with ICFR. However, compliance with IFRS by MFIs is better enhanced by corporate governance and ethical culture through ICFR.

Research limitations/implications

Results support the idea that in terms of agency and virtue ethics theories, the board should support ICFR to minimize egocentric managers and other employees and also inculcate an ethical culture to achieve better compliance with IFRS because corporate governance and ethical culture are associated with sound ICFR which in turn lead to compliance with IFRS.

Practical/implications

Boards of MFIs should encourage investments that improve ICFR. At the same time, regulators should ensure that boards are composed of members with financial expertise, with no conflict of interest and introduce mechanisms that encourage boards to perform their roles.

Originality/value

The study contributes towards a methodological position by showing that the behavioural perspective of corporate governance can be an alternative to the boards’ structural variables in investigating compliance with IFRS. A direct association of ethical culture and compliance with IFRS and an indirect association through ICFR can be envisaged.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Moses Munyami Kinatta, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, John C. Munene, Isaac Nkote and Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga

This study examines the relationship between investor cognitive bias, investor intuitive attributes and investment decision quality in commercial real estate in Uganda.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the relationship between investor cognitive bias, investor intuitive attributes and investment decision quality in commercial real estate in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional research survey was used in this study, and data were collected from 200 investors of commercial real estate in Uganda using a structured questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses derived under this study.

Findings

The results indicate that investor cognitive bias and investor intuitive attributes are positive and significant determinants of investment decision quality in commercial real estate. In addition, the two components of Investor cognitive bias (framing variation and cognitive heuristics) are positive and significant determinants of investment decision quality, whereas mental accounting is a negative and significant determinant of investment decision quality. For investor intuitive attributes, confidence degree and loss aversion are positive and significant determinants of investment decision quality, whereas herding behavior is a negative and significant determinant of investment decision quality in commercial real estate in Uganda.

Practical implications

For practitioners in commercial real estate sector should emphasize independent evaluation of investment opportunities (framing variation), simplify information regarding investments (Cognitive heuristics), believe in own abilities (Confidence degree), be risk averse (loss aversion) and avoid making decisions based on subjective visual mind (mental accounting) and group think/herding in order to make quality investment decisions. For policymakers, the study has illuminated factors such as provision of reliable information that ought to be taken into account when promulgating policies for regulation of the commercial real estate sector. This will help investors to come up with investment decisions which are plausible.

Originality/value

Few studies have focused on investor cognitive bias and investor intuitive attributes on investment decision quality in commercial real estate. This study is the first to examine the relationship, especially in the commercial real estate sector in a developing country like Uganda.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2019

Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Elizabeth Mugumya, Irene Nalukenge, Moses Muhwezi and Grace Muganga Najjemba

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship among firm characteristics, innovation, financial resilience and survival of financial institutions in Uganda.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship among firm characteristics, innovation, financial resilience and survival of financial institutions in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs a cross-sectional research design, and responses from 143 officers of 40 financial institutions are analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. The authors used ordinary least squares regression in testing the hypotheses.

Findings

The authors find that firm characteristics of size, age, innovation and financial resilience have a predictive force on survival of public interest firms such as financial institutions.

Research limitations/implications

The implication drawn here is that a combination of firm characteristics, firm innovation and financial resilience explains a significant contribution in the survival chances of financial institutions. However, as much as firm characteristics and financial resilience are significant, innovation explains more of the variances in financial institutions’ going concern appropriateness.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the limited financial institutions literature and provides the first empirical evidence of the efficacy of innovation and financial resilience on financial institutions survival. The auditing profession could consider more seriously the innovation activities and financial resilience of financial institutions in their test for the going concern assumption of such firms.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

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Article
Publication date: 23 April 2020

Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Moses Muhwezi, Doreen Musimenta, Sharon Nuwasiima and Grace Muganga Najjemba

This paper aims to show preliminary evidence of the link between the perceived low vulnerability of vital energy systems (LVRE) and social acceptance of renewable energy…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show preliminary evidence of the link between the perceived low vulnerability of vital energy systems (LVRE) and social acceptance of renewable energy (SARE) while treating environmental opportunities and threats (EOPT), renewable energy technological innovations (TECH) and business model innovations as possible antecedents.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives are delivered through a survey of 199 households (potential and actual customers/suppliers of electric power and renewable energy gadgets in Kampala and Wakiso districts of Uganda), and the data obtained were analysed using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression.

Findings

Both LVRE and EOPT, on their own, significantly predict SARE. TECH significantly mediate in the relation between EOPT and SARE. The highest form of SARE is market acceptance. Also, the current state of vulnerability of vital energy systems in the two Ugandan districts seems to espouse energy security as the real value of renewable energy. The study further finds that to deliver high SARE, there is a need to encompass potential user performance expectations of renewable energy technologies.

Research implications/limitation

Because the current results are from only two cities (districts) of Uganda and also based on a non-probability sample, generalizing them can be considered remote. In other words, it appears that more complex models need developing and testing in the future concerning LVRE and SARE. The present preliminary results are offered as a stimulus to such efforts. Well, it is expected, and, consistent with the diffusion of innovations theory (Rogers, 1995), that the population in Kampala and Wakiso districts are potential change agents (i.e. capable of influencing others in rural areas of Uganda).

Originality/value

The study estimates the direct and indirect effects to show how strongly TECH operate. Basing on OLS regression coefficients, the indirect effects are larger. Using the medgraph, we find probably for the first time, the adoption of technological innovation explains a significant part of the link between EOPT and SARE in the current study setting.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Philemon Mvura, David Nyamuyonjo, Julius Opiso and Zulaika Nakabuye

The purpose of this paper is to establish the relationship between perceived grounds for tax non-compliance or compliance behaviors and perceived tax compliance factors.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the relationship between perceived grounds for tax non-compliance or compliance behaviors and perceived tax compliance factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a correlational and cross-sectional survey design seeking to understand tax compliance by taxpayers’ perceptions in Uganda. Data from 205 respondents to the questionnaire were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Scientists and structural equation modeling with analysis of moment structures.

Findings

Governmental effectiveness, transparent tax system (TTS) and voice and accountability (VA) are perceived grounds for tax compliance or non-tax compliance and, as indicators of tax administration significantly influence variances in tax compliance. Tax compliance in Uganda is indicated by perceived worth and distribution of public expenditure (WDPE), level of taxation, inequalities in the tax system and tax evasion.

Research limitations/implications

No distinction is made between actual and potential taxpayers. Still, the results can contribute to our understanding of tax compliance puzzle from the behavioral angle. Factors such as perceived WDPE indicate a taxpayer’s compliance decision and factors such as governmental effectiveness explain that decision. Additional government policy requirements beyond greater enforcement actions by the tax authorities should be cultivated.

Originality/value

Results contribute to extending the basic tax effort model by establishing the extent to which VA, TTS and governmental effectiveness (GEF) matter in a developing country context. The study presents tax compliance as a taxpayer’s decision that is informed by perceptions and shows that factors increasing the taxpayers’ perceptions about VA and GEF relate to the importance that their perceptions have in their tax compliance decisions.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2017

Frank Kabuye, Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Julius Opiso and Zulaika Nakabuye

The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between internal audit organisational status, competencies, activities and fraud management. As a corollary, this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between internal audit organisational status, competencies, activities and fraud management. As a corollary, this paper examines the contribution made by the internal audit organisational status, the internal audit competence and the internal audit activities on fraud management in financial services firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is cross-sectional and correlational, and it uses firm-level data that were collected by means of a questionnaire survey from a sample of 54 financial services firms in Kampala – Uganda.

Findings

Results suggest that the internal audit organisational status and the internal audit competence are significant predictors of fraud management. Contrary to previous thinking, internal audit activities do not significantly predict fraud management. Therefore, once internal auditors have appropriate status and are competent in an organisation, they are likely to perform activities that enhance fraud management.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on financial services firms in Uganda, and it is possible that these results are only applicable to the financial services sector. More research is therefore needed to further understand the contribution of the internal audit constructs on fraud management in other sectors such as the public sector.

Practical implications

The results are important for internal audit policy development, for example, in terms of prescribing the competences and reporting lines for the internal auditors to enhance fraud management in the financial services sector.

Originality/value

As far as the authors are aware, no research has hitherto been undertaken that investigates the individual contribution of internal audit organisation status, competence and its activities as internal audit constructs on fraud management.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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