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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

Stephen Kempster and Jason Cope

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of leadership learning in the entrepreneurial context, by building a dynamic learning perspective of entrepreneurship…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of leadership learning in the entrepreneurial context, by building a dynamic learning perspective of entrepreneurship. It draws on contemporary leadership literature to appreciate entrepreneurial leadership as a social process of becoming located in particular contexts and communities.

Design/methodology/approach

Through qualitative phenomenological interviews with nine entrepreneurs the lived experience of learning to lead is explored. The principles of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) are utilised to analyse the data and enable inductive theory‐building.

Findings

The findings illustrate situated leadership patterns and relationships unique to the entrepreneurial context. A number of significant structural and experiential factors are identified that both shape and restrict the development of leadership practice in small ventures. Specifically, the limited opportunities for leadership enactment and observation, the dominance of the business as the crucible for leadership learning, the influence of the family and the low salience of leadership are highlighted.

Research limitations/implications

In appreciating the leadership learning task that nascent entrepreneurs are faced with it is vital that further research delves deeper into the varying levels of “leadership preparedness” brought to new venture creation. From a policy perspective, there is significant value in enabling entrepreneurs to engage in meaningful dialogue, critical reflection and purposive action with their peers through the creation of leadership “learning networks”.

Originality/value

The research demonstrates leadership learning processes and pathways that are significantly different to those experienced by managers in the employed context. In so doing, this article represents the first systematic attempt to apply a learning perspective to the subject of entrepreneurial leadership.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2009

Stephen Kempster

The purpose of this paper is to explore the invisible role of observational learning in the development of leadership practice. A model of observational learning and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the invisible role of observational learning in the development of leadership practice. A model of observational learning and leadership practice is suggested to help guide theorizing and design intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of empirical qualitative research that utilizes a time‐line interview technique with 34 managers to enable in‐depth data to be revealed of observational leadership learning. Data analysis is through a phenomenological grounded theory approach.

Findings

The paper illustrates that observational learning from “notable people” is a prominent influence of these managers' conceptions of leadership. Such observational learning differed between men and women and between employed and self‐employed contexts.

Research limitations/implications

The variety, availability and diversity of people to observe and engage with are argued here to have significant implications for the development of leadership practice.

Practical implications

The conclusions suggest that interventions into the leadership development of men and women, and between the employed and self‐employed need to be different and such interventions need to be responsive to established structural practices.

Originality/value

The paper responds to a call for contextualized, in‐depth qualitative research into leadership development, making prominent the significance of observational learning to leadership practice and how such observational learning varies between men and women, and between the employed and the self‐employed. It also provides a model of observational learning and leadership practice to guide understanding of informal leadership development.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2010

To understand how the context in which employed managers and entrepreneurs' work affects their attitude to their leadership roles.

Abstract

Purpose

To understand how the context in which employed managers and entrepreneurs' work affects their attitude to their leadership roles.

Design/methodology/approach

Presents the main points. Details the findings from the qualitative research and draws attention to the issues affecting entrepreneurs' attitude towards leadership.

Findings

In‐depth interviews with nine entrepreneurs, backed up by a literature review, yielded some interesting findings as to the relationship between entrepreneurs and their potential leadership role and threw light on how their attitudes towards leadership were different from that displayed by employed managers. Research shows that managers, working in large organizations, aspire to be leaders. They are constantly practising and developing their leadership skills in their day‐to‐day contacts with subordinates and other people that they have contact with. Much less is known about how entrepreneurs view their leadership role. Past research tended to concentrate on a trait‐based approach to leadership and focused on how managers acquired leadership skills. Recent work has rejected this approach believing that it is the context in which people work that determines their ability to develop leadership attributes and skills. It offers a dynamic view, recognizing how leadership skills are developed through taking part in a range of experiences. Focusing on the different contexts in which managers/entrepreneurs work has allowed for more insightful and informative research into why mangers/entrepreneurs may differ in their attitude towards how they view their leadership roles.

Practical implications

Provides a greater understanding of how entrepreneurs' working situation impacts on their attitude towards their development as leaders.

Social implications

Offers suggestions on how entrepreneurs' can be encouraged to take a more positive view of their leadership role that will, hopefully, have a positive effect on their company performance.

Originality/value

Provides research that sheds light on why entrepreneurs' have a different view of their leadership role from employed managers and presents ideas on how entrepreneurs in small businesses can develop their leadership skills further.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Urs Baldegger and Johanna Gast

The purpose of this paper is to explore the emergence and development of leadership within the context of new ventures.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the emergence and development of leadership within the context of new ventures.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was conducted to analyze in-depth the circumstances under which leadership is emerging and evolving in new ventures. In doing so, 55 founder-CEOs from Austria, Liechtenstein and Switzerland were interviewed.

Findings

The findings suggest that during the development from new ventures to early growth ventures the founder-CEOs and their organizations experience three major transitions. First, the founder-CEOs’ leadership behavior tends to emerge and evolve alongside firm development from being more transformational in new ventures to more transactional in early growth ventures. Second, the decisive employee selection criteria change over time, and the initially important person-founder fit turns into a person-organization fit. Third, a transition from a rather external perspective of the founder-CEOs in the new venture stage to a more internally oriented perspective in the early stages of growth was observed.

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings advance research on leadership in new ventures, the limitations concerning potential recall biases and subjectivism have to be kept in mind.

Practical implications

In practice, the findings imply that the emergence and development of leadership in new ventures should be seen as a dynamic process.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to study in-depth the emergence and development of leadership in the context of new ventures.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1899

That ice‐creams prepared with dirty materials and under dirty conditions will themselves be dirty is a proposition which, to the merely ordinary mind, appears to be…

Abstract

That ice‐creams prepared with dirty materials and under dirty conditions will themselves be dirty is a proposition which, to the merely ordinary mind, appears to be sufficiently obvious without the institution of a series of elaborate and highly “scientific” experiments to attempt to prove it. But, to the mind of the bacteriological medicine‐man, it is by microbic culture alone that anything that is dirty can be scientifically proved to be so. Not long ago, it having been observed that the itinerant vendor of ice‐creams was in the habit of rinsing his glasses, and, some say, of washing himself—although this is doubtful—in a pail of water attached to his barrow, samples of the liquor contained by such pails were duly obtained, and were solemnly submitted to a well‐known bacteriologist for bacteriological examination. After the interval necessary for the carrying out of the bacterial rites required, the eminent expert's report was published, and it may be admitted that after a cautious study of the same the conclusion seems justifiable that the pail waters were dirty, although it may well be doubted that an allegation to this effect, based on the report, would have stood the test of cross‐examination. It is true that our old and valued friend the Bacillus coli communis was reported as present, but his reputation as an awful example and as a producer of evil has been so much damaged that no one but a dangerous bacteriologist would think of hanging a dog—or even an ice‐cream vendor—on the evidence afforded by his presence. A further illustration of bacteriological trop de zèle is afforded by the recent prosecutions of some vendors of ice‐cream, whose commodities were reported to contain “millions of microbes,” including, of course, the in‐evitable and ubiquitous Bacillus coli very “communis.” To institute a prosecution under the Sale of Food and Drugs Act upon the evidence yielded by a bacteriological examination of ice‐cream is a proceeding which is foredoomed, and rightly foredoomed, to failure. The only conceivable ground upon which such a prosecution could be undertaken is the allegation that the “millions of microbes ” make the ice‐cream injurious to health. Inas‐much as not one of these millions can be proved beyond the possibility of doubt to be injurious, in the present state of knowledge; and as millions of microbes exist in everything everywhere, the breakdown of such a case must be a foregone conclusion. Moreover, a glance at the Act will show that, under existing circumstances at any rate, samples cannot be submitted to public analysts for bacteriological examination—with which, in fact, the Act has nothing to do—even if such examinations yielded results upon which it would be possible to found action. In order to prevent the sale of foul and unwholesome or actual disease‐creating ice‐cream, the proper course is to control the premises where such articles are prepared; while, at the same time, the sale of such materials should also be checked by the methods employed under the Public Health Act in dealing with decomposed and polluted articles of food. In this, no doubt, the aid of the public analyst may sometimes be sought as one of the scientific advisers of the authority taking action, but not officially in his capacity as public analyst under the Adulteration Act. And in those cases in which such advice is sought it may be hoped that it will be based, as indeed it can be based, upon something more practical, tangible and certain than the nebulous results of a bacteriological test.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 1 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1967

M.R. Denning, L.J. Salmon and L.J. Winn

June 28, 1967 Master and Servant — Confidential information — Duty not to disclose — Implied term of contract — Extent of obligation — Alleged misconduct by employers

Abstract

June 28, 1967 Master and Servant — Confidential information — Duty not to disclose — Implied term of contract — Extent of obligation — Alleged misconduct by employers — Alleged agreement by laundries to keep up prices — Agreement contrary to public interest — Whether disclosure to press justified — Restrictive Trade Practices Act, 1956 (4 & 5Eliz.II , c.68), ss.6, 9.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 2 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2016

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research in the Study of Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-651-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1964

LIBRARIANS in Britain stand at the threshold of great possibilities. Having passed through the ages of the ecclesiastical library, the rich collector's private library…

Abstract

LIBRARIANS in Britain stand at the threshold of great possibilities. Having passed through the ages of the ecclesiastical library, the rich collector's private library, the academic institutional library, and the rate‐supported public library—all general libraries —they have reached the age of the special library. The next will be that of the co‐ordinated, co‐operative library service.

Details

New Library World, vol. 65 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2021

Shiji Lyndon and Ashish Pandey

Entrepreneurship literature has not sufficiently explored the process of how, at different points in time, different members of the co-founding team emerge as leaders. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship literature has not sufficiently explored the process of how, at different points in time, different members of the co-founding team emerge as leaders. The purpose of this paper is to deconstruct the phenomenon of shared leadership emergence process amongst co-founders in entrepreneurial teams.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative approach. 21 co-founders from 7 entrepreneurial teams participated in the study. In-depth interviews were conducted. The data were analysed using Nvivo 11 software.

Findings

The study elaborates the process model of shared leadership emergence. The study found that shared interpersonal cognition and trust amongst the co-founders lead to claiming and granting of leadership. The findings also illustrate various strategies used by co-founders to emerge as leaders.

Practical implications

The findings provide key insights to entrepreneurial teams by illuminating what kind of leadership dynamics should be developed, right from the initial stages of the venture. Also, the findings would be beneficial to investors, mentors and coaches of the entrepreneurial teams and ventures, by highlighting team dynamics to be considered before making any investment or team development decisions.

Originality/value

The inductive approach adopted in the study helps in understanding the process of shared leadership emergence in entrepreneurial teams, which is not adequately answered by previous studies. The study extends both shared leadership and entrepreneurship literature by providing a process theory of leadership emergence.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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