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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Stephen John Procter and Julian Adrian Randall

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to understand how and why employee attitudes to change might change over time; and to demonstrate what type of research might best…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to understand how and why employee attitudes to change might change over time; and to demonstrate what type of research might best capture this change.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper brings together three studies of the same organization, conducted at different times by the same researchers.

Findings

Employee attitudes to change in the three episodes are portrayed in terms of the assumptions that seem to underpin them. The first episode is characterized by a challenge to the basic assumptions employees have about their work; the second, by a fragmentation of assumptions according to sub-group; and the third, by the confirmation of a new set of assumptions about what work involves.

Research limitations/implications

The paper concludes that fieldwork of a longitudinal nature is something quite rare, and its incorporation into research design needs to move beyond dealing with it through an uneasy combination of retrospection and extended organizational exposure.

Originality/value

The paper provides a rare and valuable account of how employee attitudes to change might change over time. The research design on which it is based, though fortuitous in nature, overcomes a number of the weaknesses of more conventional studies in this area.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Stephen Ackroyd and Stephen J. Procter

Although the argument will review a good deal of contemporary and historical research data, it is not to be thought of as an empirical undertaking. It is mainly an…

Abstract

Although the argument will review a good deal of contemporary and historical research data, it is not to be thought of as an empirical undertaking. It is mainly an exercise in secondary interpretation or meta‐analysis, in which findings and propositions produced by a variety of writers for a variety of audiences is reworked and re‐presented. The paper starts from the problems of contemporary manufacturing in Britain. As one authority has recently suggested: “The relatively weak performance of British firms in international markets for technologically sophisticated products in…electrical machinery and engineering products is an acknowledged fact” (Balasubramanyam, 1994. See also Coates, 1994; Ackroyd and Whittaker, 1990). In this paper it is taken as self‐evident that the successful manufacturing firm must deploy in the market high quality and differentiated products at competitive prices. The main part of the answer of how to do this under current market conditions is equally plain: it involves innovating new products, adapting product lines rapidly and, when required, increasing (and, if necessary) decreasing the scale of productive operations. The word which best sums up these requirements for successful manufacturing in current market conditions, is flexibility. Whilst we would agree that the Atkinson model of the flexible firm is based on inadequate research and inadequate analysis, against the view of some other commenta‐tors (see, in particular, Pollert, 1991), it seems to us that the question of flexibility is worth considering in more depth (see also Procter, et al, 1994). The question with which this paper is concerned is: to what extent can the British achieve flexible manufacturing?

Details

Management Research News, vol. 20 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Stephen Procter, Louise McCardle, Michael Rowlinson, John Hassard and Paul Forrester

Pollert's latest contribution to the flexibility debate has been to denounce the concept as an appropriate framework for research and to state that it should be replaced…

Abstract

Pollert's latest contribution to the flexibility debate has been to denounce the concept as an appropriate framework for research and to state that it should be replaced by one that takes into account the complexities and relations of the real world (Pollert 1991, p. 31). Similarly, Wood has argued that the problem with the flexibility debate is that the organisational model of the flexible firm has over‐emphasised management's pursuit of flexibility as though it were an end in itself. Flexibility should be seen as only one of management's aims and ought to remain attached to other goals and interests of management (Wood 1989).

Details

Management Research News, vol. 15 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

John S. Hassard and Stephen J. Procter

The introduction of cellular manufacture in two factories isexamined. In the first factory, the economic difficulties driving thechanges were anticipated rather than being…

Abstract

The introduction of cellular manufacture in two factories is examined. In the first factory, the economic difficulties driving the changes were anticipated rather than being felt. Its most pressing problem was how to divide its products into the “families” necessary for cellular production. It was decided that this division should to some extent determine what products should be produced rather than vice versa. For the second factory, where economic difficulties were already present, the stage had been reached at which it had to be decided who was to work in the cells. Though the decisions had been made, they had not been communicated to the workforce for fear of disrupting current production. In both cases it can be seen that in order to gain the benefits of cellular manufacture, fundamental changes have to be made not only in the production process but also in the management of human resources.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Content available
561

Abstract

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

5115

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2007

340

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Matthew Hood

Tiger Woods suffered minor injuries and major scrutiny into his personal life due to a suspicious car crash. Previous research suggests that his sponsors would be expected…

2761

Abstract

Purpose

Tiger Woods suffered minor injuries and major scrutiny into his personal life due to a suspicious car crash. Previous research suggests that his sponsors would be expected to suffer a significant negative shock. The purpose of this paper is to determine if there was such a shock and to clarify the role that the estimation and event windows have on measuring its significance.

Design/methodology/approach

The event study methodology is used for Tiger's core sports related sponsors: Electronic Arts (Tiger Woods PGA TOUR), Nike (Nike Golf), and Pepsi (Gatorade) and his sponsors that are unrelated to sports: AT&T, Accenture, and Procter & Gamble.

Findings

The sponsors did not suffer a statistically significant negative cumulative abnormal return. Even under liberal standards and for any event or estimation window that was considered. However, the event windows and estimation windows greatly affected the test statistics.

Originality/value

Tiger Woods' situation is, perhaps, the perfect case study for many papers that have found a negative stock market reaction to a scandal. Yet, there sponsor's stocks did not have a significantly negative response under any condition studied. Also, the estimation window is found to have a very large impact on the test statistics.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

203

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2010

Matthew S. OHern and Aric Rindfleisch

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

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