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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Yang Zhang, Juanita Trusty, Tatiana Goroshnikova, Louise Kelly, Kwok K. Kwong, Stephen J.J. McGuire, Juan Perusquia, Veena P. Prabhu, Minghao Shen and Robert Tang

The purpose of this study is to propose and test predictors of millennials’ social entrepreneurial intent (SEI), mediating mechanisms and influential contextual factors.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose and test predictors of millennials’ social entrepreneurial intent (SEI), mediating mechanisms and influential contextual factors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study includes survey data from 1,890 respondents, 315 each from China, Mexico, Nigeria, Philippines, Russia and the USA.

Findings

Empirical results show that social entrepreneurial self-efficacy (SESE) mediated the relationship between perseverance and proactive personality and the dependent variable SEI in all six countries. Life satisfaction positively moderated this relationship among US students and negatively moderated it among Chinese students. In China dissatisfaction appears to enhance SEI, while in the US satisfaction appears to do so.

Originality/value

This paper identifies the mediating role of SESE and the moderating role of life satisfaction when explaining SEI, as well as providing data from millennials in six countries.

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Abstract

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2010

Stephen J.J. McGuire, Ellen A. Drost, K. Kern Kwong, David Linnevers, Ryan Tash and Oxana Lavrova

A family business founded by Chinese immigrants grew into a $133 million toy and costume maker by exploiting seasonal niche segments in the highly competitive, global toy…

Abstract

A family business founded by Chinese immigrants grew into a $133 million toy and costume maker by exploiting seasonal niche segments in the highly competitive, global toy industry. Sales of traditional toys stagnated when replaced by game consoles and electronic toys. Unable to compete in high tech toys, MegaToys moved instead toward seasonal products. In 2007, brothers Peter and Charlie Woo were about to pitch what they hoped would be $63 million in Easter basket sales to Wal-Mart. If Wal-Mart took the full order, it would come to represent over half of MegaToys' revenue.

The company was faced with the dilemma of how to grow, and at what pace. Charlie Woo knew that MegaToys could continue to grow as long as it was able to satisfy Wal-Mart's demands. Peter Woo wondered if this was the smartest way to grow the business. “Growth is a good thing as long as you don't sell your shirt to get it,” he noted. Should MegaToys continue to increase its sales to Wal-Mart, or would dependence on Wal-Mart eventually threaten the firm's success? Were there other, untapped opportunities for MegaToys that were well aligned with its strengths, resources, and capabilities?

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Veena P. Prabhu, Stephen J. McGuire, Ellen A. Drost and Kern K. Kwong

The purpose of the present study, which is part of a larger cross‐cultural study, is to examine two potential antecedents of entrepreneurial intent (EI): proactive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study, which is part of a larger cross‐cultural study, is to examine two potential antecedents of entrepreneurial intent (EI): proactive personality (PP) and entrepreneurial self‐efficacy (ESE). Specifically, the study is interested in empirically testing the mechanism (mediation/moderation) by which ESE affected the relationship between PP/EI.

Design/methodology/approach

For testing the mediation and moderation hypotheses the study used structural equation modeling and moderated regression analyses respectively.

Findings

The authors found that PP has a robust relationship with the three different manifestations of EI – general, high growth, and lifestyle. Furthermore, ESE not only mediated the relationship between PP and all the three forms of EI but also moderated the relationship between PP and high growth EI as well as PP and lifestyle EI.

Research limitations/implications

The authors studied intent, not behavior, with the understanding that cognitive intent is a powerful predictor of later behavior. Future research can replicate this study using entrepreneurial behavior instead of intent. Implications for education and future research are discussed.

Practical implications

The results of the study can be used and applied to both pedagogic and business settings in the field of entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

The present study not only provides evidence for the robust relationship between EI and PP but provides insight into the mechanism by which ESE affects EI/PP relationship.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2010

Gina Vega

Abstract

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Sally McGuire, Alex Stephens and Emma Griffith

This paper aims to describe a service evaluation study of “Balance” – a National Health Service Tier 2 pilot weight management course delivered in a primary care mental…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a service evaluation study of “Balance” – a National Health Service Tier 2 pilot weight management course delivered in a primary care mental health service. The 12 weekly sessions included dietetic, psychological and behavioural elements underpinned by cognitive behavioural theory and “third-wave” approaches, including acceptance and commitment therapy, compassion-focused therapy and mindfulness.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods design was used in this service evaluation study that included analysis of outcome measures (weight, eating choices, weight-related self-efficacy and mental health) and focus group data (n = 6) analysed using thematic analysis. Eleven clients with a body mass index of 25–40 kg/m2 enrolled, and nine clients completed the course. Outcome data were collected weekly with follow-up at three and six months.

Findings

Quantitative data analysis using non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed that the group mean weight decreased significantly (p = 0.030) by the end of Balance, but the group mean weight loss was not statistically significant at the three-month (p = 0.345) or six-month (p = 0.086) follow-up. The qualitative results showed that participants valued the course ethos of choice and also welcomed learning new tools and techniques. Balance was very well-received by participants who reported benefitting from improved well-being, group support and developing new weight management skills.

Research limitations/implications

Only one client attended all sessions of the group, and it is possible that missed sessions impacted effectiveness. Some of the weight change data collected at the six-month follow-up was self-reported (n = 4), which could reduce data reliability. Focus group participants were aware that Balance was a pilot with a risk that the group would not be continued. As the group wanted the pilot to be extended, the feedback may have been positively skewed. A small sample size limits interpretation of the results. A group weight management intervention, including dietetic, psychological and behavioural elements, underpinned by cognitive behavioural theory was well-received by service users and effective for some. Commissioners and service users may have different definitions of successful outcomes in weight management interventions.

Practical implications

Longer-term support and follow-up after Tier 2 weight management interventions may benefit service users and improve outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to a small but growing evidence base concerned with the design and delivery of weight management interventions. Areas of particular interest include: a gap analysis between the course content and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence clinical guidelines, participants’ views on the most impactful course features and recommendations for course development. The results also show a disconnect between evidence-based guidelines (mandatory weight monitoring), participants’ preferences and clinicians' experience. The difference between client and commissioner priorities is also discussed.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2020

Abstract

Details

Integrating Community Service into Curriculum: International Perspectives on Humanizing Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-434-7

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2017

Abstract

Details

Engaging Dissonance: Developing Mindful Global Citizenship in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-154-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Ali F. Darrat

The primary purpose of this article is to investigate empirically for the US the potential impact of monetary and fiscal policy upon real economic activity using the “St…

Abstract

The primary purpose of this article is to investigate empirically for the US the potential impact of monetary and fiscal policy upon real economic activity using the “St. Louis equation” approach. Only lagged values of the policy variables are included in the estimation to ensure their statistical exogeneity. Hsiao's (1981) multivariate technique is employed to determine the model lag specification. The empirical results suggest that only fiscal policy as measured by high‐employment tax changes can exert a significant lasting impact upon real GNP. Monetary policy, on the other hand, has only a temporary effect on real GNP. The results also show that both monetary and fiscal policy have significant and permanent effects on nominal GNP, the former via its permanent effect on prices and the latter through its permanent effect on real GNP.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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